Entertainment Violence In Ancient Rome

Autore: Magnus Wistrand
Editore: Coronet Books Incorporated
ISBN:
Grandezza: 55,79 MB
Formato: PDF, Mobi
Vista: 8179
Scaricare Leggi Online


Ancient Roman Writers

Autore: Ward W. Briggs
Editore: Gale / Cengage Learning
ISBN:
Grandezza: 69,54 MB
Formato: PDF, ePub, Docs
Vista: 8715
Scaricare Leggi Online

The history of Rome is essentially the history of one nation imitating another, namely Greece. The Romans invented only one genre, the satire. Roman writers borrowed their subject matter from the Greeks in all but one respect, history. Several of these Roman authors were slaves or came from slave families. It was the Greek-speaking early-freed slaves that taught the Romans to give their literature subjectivity.

Ancient Roman Writers

Autore: Source: Wikipedia
Editore: Books LLC, Wiki Series
ISBN: 9781233149773
Grandezza: 48,98 MB
Formato: PDF, Mobi
Vista: 4239
Scaricare Leggi Online

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 39. Chapters: Julius Caesar, Virgil, Quintilian, Gaius Julius Hyginus, Juvenal, Marcus Terentius Varro, Phaedrus, Pontius of Carthage, Aulus Cremutius Cordus, Sulpicia, Arnobius, Alfenus Varus, Aulus Cornelius Celsus, Publius Rutilius Rufus, Marcus Antistius Labeo, Commodian, Aulus Hirtius, Julius Obsequens, Columella, Publilius Syrus, Marcus Minucius Felix, Fenestella, Aggenus Urbicus, Siculus Flaccus, Gaius Matius, Quintus Antistius Labeo, Alcimus Alethius, Quintus Gargilius Martialis, Scribonius Largus, Decimus Laberius, Aufidius Namusa, Grattius, Vibius Sequester, Pelagonius, Hyginus Gromaticus, Eucolpius, Titus Quinctius Atta, Aelius Festus Aphthonius. Excerpt: Gaius Julius Caesar (13 July 100 BC - 15 March 44 BC) was a Roman general and statesman. He played a critical role in the gradual transformation of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire. In 60 BC, Caesar entered into a political alliance with Crassus and Pompey that was to dominate Roman politics for several years. Their attempts to amass power through populist tactics were opposed within the Roman Senate by the conservative elite, among them Cato the Younger with the frequent support of Cicero. Caesar's conquest of Gaul, completed by 51 BC, extended Rome's territory to the English Channel and the Rhine. Caesar became the first Roman general to cross both when he built a bridge across the Rhine and conducted the first invasion of Britain. These achievements granted him unmatched military power and threatened to eclipse Pompey's standing. The balance of power was further upset by the death of Crassus in 53 BC. Political realignments in Rome finally led to a standoff between Caesar and Pompey, the latter having taken up the cause of the Senate. Ordered by the senate to stand trial in Rome for various charges, Caesar marched from Gaul to Italy with his legions, crossi...

Dictionary Of Literary Biography Vol 211

Autore:
Editore:
ISBN:
Grandezza: 53,49 MB
Formato: PDF, Docs
Vista: 8155
Scaricare Leggi Online


Spqr A History Of Ancient Rome

Autore: Mary Beard
Editore: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 1631491253
Grandezza: 59,95 MB
Formato: PDF, ePub, Docs
Vista: 220
Scaricare Leggi Online

A sweeping, revisionist history of the Roman Empire from one of our foremost classicists. Ancient Rome was an imposing city even by modern standards, a sprawling imperial metropolis of more than a million inhabitants, a "mixture of luxury and filth, liberty and exploitation, civic pride and murderous civil war" that served as the seat of power for an empire that spanned from Spain to Syria. Yet how did all this emerge from what was once an insignificant village in central Italy? In S.P.Q.R., world-renowned classicist Mary Beard narrates the unprecedented rise of a civilization that even two thousand years later still shapes many of our most fundamental assumptions about power, citizenship, responsibility, political violence, empire, luxury, and beauty. From the foundational myth of Romulus and Remus to 212 ce—nearly a thousand years later—when the emperor Caracalla gave Roman citizenship to every free inhabitant of the empire, S.P.Q.R. (the abbreviation of "The Senate and People of Rome") examines not just how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries by exploring how the Romans thought of themselves: how they challenged the idea of imperial rule, how they responded to terrorism and revolution, and how they invented a new idea of citizenship and nation. Opening the book in 63 bce with the famous clash between the populist aristocrat Catiline and Cicero, the renowned politician and orator, Beard animates this “terrorist conspiracy,” which was aimed at the very heart of the Republic, demonstrating how this singular event would presage the struggle between democracy and autocracy that would come to define much of Rome’s subsequent history. Illustrating how a classical democracy yielded to a self-confident and self-critical empire, S.P.Q.R. reintroduces us, though in a wholly different way, to famous and familiar characters—Hannibal, Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Augustus, and Nero, among others—while expanding the historical aperture to include those overlooked in traditional histories: the women, the slaves and ex-slaves, conspirators, and those on the losing side of Rome’s glorious conquests. Like the best detectives, Beard sifts fact from fiction, myth and propaganda from historical record, refusing either simple admiration or blanket condemnation. Far from being frozen in marble, Roman history, she shows, is constantly being revised and rewritten as our knowledge expands. Indeed, our perceptions of ancient Rome have changed dramatically over the last fifty years, and S.P.Q.R., with its nuanced attention to class inequality, democratic struggles, and the lives of entire groups of people omitted from the historical narrative for centuries, promises to shape our view of Roman history for decades to come.

Women Writers Of Ancient Greece And Rome

Autore: Ian Michael Plant
Editore: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806136219
Grandezza: 71,43 MB
Formato: PDF, Docs
Vista: 254
Scaricare Leggi Online

Despite a common perception that most writing in antiquity was produced by men, some important literature written by women during this period has survived. Edited by I. M. Plant, Women Writers of Ancient Greece and Rome is a comprehensive anthology of the surviving literary texts of women writers from the Graeco-Roman world that offers new English translations from the works of more than fifty women. From Sappho, who lived in the seventh century B.C., to Eudocia and Egeria of the fifth century A.D., the texts presented here come from a wide range of sources and span the fields of poetry and prose. Each author is introduced with a critical review of what we know about the writer, her work, and its significance, along with a discussion of the texts that follow. A general introduction looks into the problem of the authenticity of some texts attributed to women and places their literature into the wider literary and social contexts of the ancient Graeco-Roman world.

The Politics Of Immorality In Ancient Rome

Autore: Catharine Edwards
Editore: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521893893
Grandezza: 33,98 MB
Formato: PDF, ePub
Vista: 7752
Scaricare Leggi Online

The decadence and depravity of the ancient Romans are a commonplace of serious history, popular novels and spectacular films. This book is concerned not with the question of how immoral the ancient Romans were but why the literature they produced is so preoccupied with immorality. The modern image of immoral Rome derives from ancient accounts which are largely critical rather than celebratory. Upper-class Romans habitually accused one another of the most lurid sexual and sumptuary improprieties. Historians and moralists lamented the vices of their contemporaries and mourned for the virtues of a vanished age. Far from being empty commonplaces these assertions constituted a powerful discourse through which Romans negotiated conflicts and tensions in their social and political order. This study proceeds by a detailed examination of a wide range of ancient texts (all of which are translated) exploring the dynamics of their rhetoric, as well as the ends to which they were deployed. Roman moralising discourse, the author suggests, may be seen as especially concerned with the articulation of anxieties about gender, social status and political power. Individual chapters focus on adultery, effeminacy, the immorality of the Roman theatre, luxurious buildings and the dangers of pleasure. This book should appeal to students and scholars of classical literature and ancient history. It will also attract anthropologists and social and cultural historians.

The Classical Manual

Autore: James Skerret Shore Baird
Editore:
ISBN:
Grandezza: 24,29 MB
Formato: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Vista: 8237
Scaricare Leggi Online


The Ancient Romans

Autore: Paul Roberts
Editore: Getty Publications
ISBN: 9780892369867
Grandezza: 20,68 MB
Formato: PDF, ePub, Docs
Vista: 2319
Scaricare Leggi Online

Introduces ancient Roman society and the everyday life of people of different classes and occupations.

Women Poets In Ancient Greece And Rome

Autore: Ellen Greene
Editore: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806136646
Grandezza: 16,35 MB
Formato: PDF
Vista: 8673
Scaricare Leggi Online

Although Greek society was largely male-dominated, it gave rise to a strong tradition of female authorship. Women poets of ancient Greece and Rome have long fascinated readers, even though much of their poetry survives only in fragmentary form. This pathbreaking volume is the first collection of essays to examine virtually all surviving poetry by Greek and Roman women. It elevates the status of the poems by demonstrating their depth and artistry. Edited and with an introduction by Ellen Greene, the volume covers a broad time span, beginning with Sappho (ca. 630 b.c.e.) in archaic Greece and extending to Sulpicia (first century B.C.E.) in Augustan Rome. In their analyses, the contributors situate the female poets in an established male tradition, but they also reveal their distinctly “feminine” perspectives. Despite relying on literary convention, the female poets often defy cultural norms, speaking in their own voices and transcending their positions as objects of derision in male-authored texts. In their innovative reworkings of established forms, women poets of ancient Greece and Rome are not mere imitators but creators of a distinct and original body of work.