Geography For The Lost

Autore: Kapka Kassabova
Editore: Auckland University Press
ISBN: 1869406141
Grandezza: 35,83 MB
Formato: PDF
Vista: 8880
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In Geography for the Lost, travelling poems speak from different parts of the world and different moments in time, but always of the many ways to be lost and disoriented: in a place, in the past, in fear, in the very quickness of life. The voices here - from a Roman housewife to a Chinese bar-owner in Berlin or an Argentine DJ - are of the heartsick, the culturally jet-lagged, people from photographs, the 'tenants' of lives, cities and destinies. This is what we all are, have been, or will be. Colourful, haunting, funny, bitter-sweet, the poems in Geography for the Lost mirror the restlessness of the human condition in Kassabova's best book yet.

Le Figlie Dei Faraoni

Autore: Emilio Salgari
Editore:
ISBN: 9781544657462
Grandezza: 21,37 MB
Formato: PDF
Vista: 3722
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Oltre ai pi� noti e corposi cicli di libri tra essi collegati, la produzione letteraria di Emilio Salgari annovera una gran quantit� di romanzi singoli. Tra essi figura Le Figlie dei Faraoni, edito nel 1906 ed ambientato nel suggestivo scenario egiziano del Nilo.

Book Of The Subgenius

Autore: Subgenius Foundation
Editore: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439188653
Grandezza: 33,23 MB
Formato: PDF, Mobi
Vista: 6187
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Sometimes a book goes too far. Sometimes is... now. First, there was The Gilgamesh. Then... the Bhagavad-Gita Then... the Torah, the New Testament, the Koran Then... the Book of Mormon, Dianetics, I'm OK You're OK. And now...The Book of the Subgenius (How to Prosper in the Coming Weird Times)

Green Planets

Autore: Gerry Canavan
Editore: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 0819574287
Grandezza: 19,35 MB
Formato: PDF, Mobi
Vista: 2543
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Contemporary visions of the future have been shaped by hopes and fears about the effects of human technology and global capitalism on the natural world. In an era of climate change, mass extinction, and oil shortage, such visions have become increasingly catastrophic, even apocalyptic. Exploring the close relationship between science fiction, ecology, and environmentalism, the essays in Green Planets consider how science fiction writers have been working through this crisis. Beginning with H. G. Wells and passing through major twentieth-century writers like Ursula K. Le Guin, Stanislaw Lem, and Thomas Disch to contemporary authors like Margaret Atwood, China Miéville, and Paolo Bacigalupi—as well as recent blockbuster films like Avatar and District 9—the essays in Green Planets consider the important place for science fiction in a culture that now seems to have a very uncertain future. The book includes an extended interview with Kim Stanley Robinson and an annotated list for further exploration of “ecological SF” and related works of fiction, nonfiction, films, television, comics, children’s cartoons, anime, video games, music, and more. Contributors include Christina Alt, Brent Bellamy, Sabine Höhler, Adeline Johns-Putra, Melody Jue, Rob Latham, Andrew Milner, Timothy Morton, Eric C. Otto, Michael Page, Christopher Palmer, Gib Prettyman, Elzette Steenkamp, Imre Szeman.

Cabiria

Autore: Gabriele D'Annunzio
Editore: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781530784547
Grandezza: 58,41 MB
Formato: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Vista: 2564
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Notice: This Book is published by Historical Books Limited (www.publicdomain.org.uk) as a Public Domain Book, if you have any inquiries, requests or need any help you can just send an email to [email protected] This book is found as a public domain and free book based on various online catalogs, if you think there are any problems regard copyright issues please contact us immediately via [email protected]

Dangerous Love

Autore: Ben Okri
Editore: Head of Zeus
ISBN: 1784081868
Grandezza: 41,55 MB
Formato: PDF
Vista: 1061
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From the Booker Prize-winner Ben Okri: a classic love story set in a country trying to come to terms with its past. An epic of daily life, DANGEROUS LOVE is a story of doomed love, of star-crossed lovers, separated not by their families, but by the very circumstances of their lives. 'I hope among my novels this one achieves something I have long sought.' BEN OKRI.

Arts Foods Rituali Dal 1851 Catalogo Della Mostra Milano 9 Aprile 1 Novembre 2015 Ediz Inglese

Autore: G. Celant
Editore:
ISBN: 9788891803313
Grandezza: 21,52 MB
Formato: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Vista: 6782
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Lucian S True History

Autore: Lucian of Samosata
Editore: Library of Alexandria
ISBN: 1465604537
Grandezza: 78,84 MB
Formato: PDF, ePub, Docs
Vista: 9398
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It is a commonplace of criticism that Lucian was the first of the moderns, but in truth he is near to our time because of all the ancients he is nearest to his own. With Petronius he shared the discovery that there is material for literature in the debased and various life of every day—that to the seeing eye the individual is more wonderful in colour and complexity than the severely simple abstraction of the poets. He replaced the tradition, respected of his fathers, by an observation more vivid and less pedantic than the note-book of the naturalist. He set the world in the dry light of truth, and since the vanity of mankind is a constant factor throughout the ages, there is scarce a page of Lucian's writing that wears the faded air of antiquity. His personages are as familiar to-day as they were in the second century, because, with his pitiless determination to unravel the tangled skein of human folly, he never blinded his vision to their true qualities. And the multiplicity of his interest is as fresh as his penetration. Nothing came amiss to his eager curiosity. For the first time in the history of literature (with the doubtful exception of Cicero) we encounter a writer whose ceaseless activity includes the world. While others had declared themselves poets, historians, philosophers, Lucian comes forth as a man of letters. Had he lived to-day, he would have edited a newspaper, written leading articles, and kept his name ever before the public in the magazines. For he possessed the qualities, if he avoided the defects, of the journalist. His phrase had not been worn by constant use to imbecility; his sentences were not marred by the association of commonness; his style was still his own and fit for the expression of a personal view. But he noted such types and incidents as make an immediate, if perennial, appeal, and to study him is to be convinced that literature and journalism are not necessarily divorced. The profession was new, and with the joy of the innovator Lucian was never tired of inventing new genres. Romance, criticism, satire—he mastered them all. In Toxaris and The Ass he proves with what delicacy and restraint he could handle the story. His ill-omened apprenticeship to a sculptor gave him that taste and feeling for art which he turned to so admirable an account. He was, in fact, the first of the art-critics, and he pursued the craft with an easy unconsciousness of the heritage he bequeathed to the world. True, he is silent concerning the technical practice of the Greeks; true, he leaves us in profound ignorance of the art of Zeuxis, whose secrets he might have revealed, had he been less a man of letters. But he found in painting and sculpture an opportunity for elegance of phrase, and we would forgive a thousand shortcomings for such inspirations of beauty as the smile of Sosandra: to τὸ μειδίαμα σεμνὸν καὶ λεληθὸς. In literary criticism he was on surer ground, and here also he leaves the past behind. His knowledge of Greek poetry was profound; Homer he had by heart; and on every page he proves his sympathies by covert allusion or precise quotation. His treatise concerning the Writing of History preserves its force irresistible after seventeen centuries, nor has the wisdom of the ages impeached or modified this lucid argument. With a modest wit he compares himself to Diogenes, who, when he saw his fellow-citizens busied with the preparations of war, gathered his skirts about him and fell to rolling his tub up and down. So Lucian, unambitious of writing history, sheltered himself from "the waves and the smoke," and was content to provide others with the best of good counsel. Yet such is the irony of accident that, as Lucian's criticism has outlived the masterpieces of Zeuxis, so the historians have snatched an immortality from his censure; and let it be remembered for his glory that he used Thucydides as a scourge wherewith to beat impostors. But matters of so high import did not always engross his humour, and in The Illiterate Book-buyer he satirizes a fashion of the hour and of all time with a courage and brutality which tear the heart out of truth. How intimately does he realize his victim! And how familiar is this same victim in his modern shape!