Caregiving In The Illness Context

Author: T. Revenson
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137558989
Size: 17,57 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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How does caregiving affect health and well-being and what resources help caregivers? This book provides a synthesis of psychological research on caregiver stress and brings attention to the personal, social and structural factors that affect caregivers' well-being and as well as recent behavioral interventions to enhance health.

Counseling Clients Near The End Of Life

Author: James L. Werth, Jr., PhD
Editor: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 0826108504
Size: 15,53 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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"I found this book to be a well-written, sensitively presented, and important resource for those engaged in this critical area of work. Thank you, Dr. Werth, for making such a substantial contribution to this field."--Journal of Palliative Care "[This book offers] over 20 contributors, all with impeccable credentials, covering many perspectives that we need to consider more frequently and in greater depth...There is much that awaits you in this book."--Illness, Crisis, and Loss "Counseling Clients Near the End of Life is a marvelous resource for mental health providers who are searching for useful information in areas such as the following: resolving ethical dilemmas; assisting clients in planning for the end of life; counseling caregivers of clients who are near the end of life; and assisting people in dealing with grief. The editor of this work, Dr. James Werth, has done a splendid job of gathering various experts to share their perspectives on end of life care and choices at this time of life--and he has also written an excellent chapter on counseling clients who are dying." Gerald Corey, EdD, ABPP Professor Emeritus of Human Services and Counseling California State University, Fullerton This highly accessible guide to counseling people who are terminally ill and their families fills a critical need in the counseling literature. Written for front-line mental health professionals and counseling graduate students, the text integrates research with practical guidance. It is replete with the experiences of contributing authors who are leaders in counseling terminally ill individuals , real-life case examples, clinical pearls of wisdom, and tables of practice pointers that provide quick access to valuable knowledge. The text offers information that is requisite for all counselors who provide services to persons who are terminally ill and their families. It addresses common issues that influence different types of counseling approaches, such as how the age, ethnicity, or religion of a client affects counselor conceptualizations and actions. The book discusses how to manage symptoms of depression, anxiety, and cognitive impairment near the end of life. It explains how advance directives can be used to assist dying individuals and their loved ones. The counseling needs of family members before and after death are addressed as well as counseling loved ones experiencing complicated grief. The text also examines the particular concerns of counselors regarding self-care and the benefits of working as part of a professional team. Woven throughout are important considerations such as cultural diversity, ethical challenges, laws, and regulations; and advocacy at client and social policy levels. Readers will also benefit from the inclusion of additional references for more in-depth study. Key Features: Integrates research with practical and accessible information Provides clinical ìpearlsî that can be put to use immediately Provides a reader-friendly format that includes real-life case studies and tables with important pointers Describes the counseling experiences of leading practitioners that include examples of successful and unsuccessful interventions Based on a comprehensive framework developed by a Working Group of the American Psychological Association

Dementia Care With Black And Latino Families

Author: Delia J González Sanders, PhD LCSW
Editor: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 0826106781
Size: 18,58 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Designated a Doody's Core Title! "The authors have created a book that comfortably combines substantial research findings with readable, practical guidelines for assessment and intervention in the real-world practice of social work. This authoritatively researched, well-written volume will appeal to the multiple disciplines involved in assisting dementia patients and their families. It will also be useful for academic health care collections...Highly recommended."--Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries Understanding the role of dementia caregivers in different ethnic and cultural contexts is one of the most important skills that social workers should master. This comprehensive volume provides practical guidance for social work professionals who work with Black and Latino families living with the daily challenges of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. It is grounded in the interpretation and meaning of dementia in Black and Latino cultural heritages, and based on both a solid theoretical framework and the substantial research and clinical expertise of the authors. Detailed, step-by-step guidelines to assessment and intervention in ethnic-specific situations provide useful strategies that go beyond generic solutions. The text presents an overview of the epidemiology and clinical course of dementia with a focus on those forms of the disease most common to Blacks and Latinos. It addresses family care and role responsibilities in ethnic families and their theoretical, ethnic, and cultural foundations. Self-efficacy and cognitive behavioral problem-solving theories are discussed as modalities of choice. The text also considers financial and service delivery trends and use of technology, and provides detailed forms, documents, and dementia care resources. Numerous case studies will help readers to quickly put information into the context of real-world situations. Key Features: Provides concrete, targeted interventions for assisting ethnic family caregivers in confronting day-to-day issues Explains how and why self-efficacy and cognitive behavioral problem-solving theories are particularly useful for social work with ethnic family caregivers Offers detailed, step-by-step guidelines to assessment and intervention Includes problem-solving forms, documents, and additional dementia care resources Contains vivid supporting case studies in each chapter

Mental Illness Dementia And Family In China

Author: Guy Ramsay
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 041581006X
Size: 15,27 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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With rapid economic progress and increasing life expectancy in East Asian societies, more attention is being paid by their governments, the media and the academy to mental illness and dementia. While clinical research on mental illness and dementia in Chinese societies acknowledges the importance of culture in shaping people's experiences of these illnesses, how Chinese culture shapes people's understandings of and responses to mental illness and dementia has yet to be interrogated to any depth. Mental Illness, Dementia and Family in China breaks new ground in exploring how Chinese culture, namely, the understandings, norms, values and scripts that people acquire through being members of a Chinese community, shapes contemporary stories of mental illness, dementia and family care-giving. This book is innovative in examining and comparing stories which have been drawn from both real life ('life stories'), as well as from film and television productions ('filmic stories'). These two forms effectively complement each other, with life stories generally presenting an 'insider's' account and filmic stories generally presenting an 'outsider's' account. What remains unvoiced in one kind of story may be voiced in the other kind. Drawing on the perspectives and analytic approaches of narrative analysis and cultural studies, Guy Ramsay uncovers culturally-shaped continuities and departures in representations of time, identity and cause of illness as well as in the language employed in contemporary stories of mental illness, dementia and family care-giving in China. This book will be invaluable to students and scholars working on Chinese cultural studies and Asian social policy, as well as those interested in psychiatry, mental health and disability studies more broadly.

Grief And Bereavement In The Adult Palliative Care Setting

Author: E. Alessandra Strada
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199768927
Size: 17,58 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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For patients and family caregivers the journey through illness and transitions of care is characterized by a series of progressive physical and emotional losses. Grief reactions represent the natural response to those losses. Grief is defined by a constellation of physical, cognitive, emotional and spiritual manifestations, varying in length and severity. While grief reactions are common and expected responses to loss, they have the potential to cause significant suffering. And, while grief is not a disease, it can develop into a pathological process warranting specialized treatment. Additionally, some aspects of grief overlap with the symptoms of clinical depression and anxiety, making diagnosis difficult. Grief and Bereavement in the Adult Palliative Care Setting provides practical, evidence-based, and clinically effective approaches to understanding the multifaceted nature of grief and bereavement in patients with advanced illness and their caregivers. This handbook is an ideal tool for palliative care providers of various disciplines who provide direct clinical services to patients and family members. It assists clinicians in recognizing and identifying grief reactions as unique expressions of patients and caregivers' history and psychological functioning. Primary care physicians who provide care to patients and families will also find this practical assessment and treatment guide helpful. They will learn how to best support bereaved patients and caregivers when grief is uncomplicated, and when to choose more active interventions that may include appropriate referrals to mental health professionals.

Handbook Of Social Work In Health And Aging

Author: Barbara Berkman
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198038739
Size: 15,11 MB
Format: PDF
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The Handbook of Social Work in Health and Aging is the first reference to combine the fields of health care, aging, and social work in a single, authoritative volume. These areas are too often treated as discrete entities, while the reality is that all social workers deal with issues in health and aging on a daily basis, regardless of practice specialization. As the baby boomers age, the impact on practice in health and aging will be dramatic, and social workers need more specialized knowledge about aging, health care, and the resources available to best serve older adults and their families. The volume's 102 original chapters and 13 overviews, written by the most experienced and prominent gerontological health care scholars in the United States and across the world, provide social work practitioners and educators with up-to-date knowledge of evidence-based practice guidelines for effectively assessing and treating older adults and their families; new models for intervention in both community-based practice and institutional care; and knowledge of significant policy and research issues in health and aging. A truly monumental resource, this handbook represents the best research on health and aging available to social workers today.

Family Caregiving In Mental Illness

Author: Harriet P. Lefley
Editor: Sage Publications, Inc
ISBN: 9780803957206
Size: 16,19 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"This is the most comprehensive book to-date about the role that families play in caring for adults with mental illness. Unique to this volume is an examination of caregiving roles from an historical perspective as well as from the perspective of various caregiving relationships--parents, adult children, and siblings. Of special importance is Dr. Lefley's delineation of the nature of caregiving throughout the life cycle of the family." Agnes B. Hatfield, Ph.D., University of Maryland at College Park "I find Harriet Lefley's new book Family Caregiving in Mental Illness to be extremely thoughtful and comprehensive. It is all here--family theories and research, caregiving in the context of changes in the family life cycle, coping strategies, cross-cultural issues, advocacy, patient rights, and mental health policy. Dr. Lefley is the expert of experts when it comes to family caregiving in serious mental illness. The book is very readable and accessible to family members, social workers, and policymakers. It represents another big step in Dr. Lefley's courageous effort to bring family issues to public attention." --Richard Tessler, Ph.D. University of Massachusetts Deinstitutionalization suddenly catapults family members into being the primary caregivers for functionally impaired adults who are diagnosed with mental illness. This role as caregiver is one that family members are untrained and unprepared for. In Family Caregiving in Mental Illness, author Harriet Lefley explores the experiences of those giving care for adults with mental illness. She thoughtfully examines the unique characteristics and conceptual models related to mental illness and then surveys the experience of mental illness in the context of the family life cycle and developmental stages of the illness. Family burden, including social stigma; treatment barriers; iatrogenic stress; and the relationship between the patient and caregiver are appraised while the influence on other family members is highlighted. The stages of familial response, specific types of coping strategies, and professional and nonclinical services for families are reviewed, along with positive affects on the family's welfare. Finally, cultural factors affecting family caregiving are discussed in the international context and in terms of ethnic differences within the United States. Also considered are the impact of advocacy movements on caregivers, the legal and ethical barriers to care, alternative models to family caregiving, and the maintenance and growth of consumer-run services. All professionals working with persons with mental illness as well as researchers and students in this area will find Family Caregiving in Mental Illness illuminating and valuable.

Caregiving Contexts

Author: Maximiliane E. Szinovacz, PhD
Editor: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 9780826103109
Size: 10,23 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"This volume represents a major step forward in the literature by placing its focus squarely on the caregiving context, its dimensions and how it shapes the process and outcomes of family care. The chapters locate care within the family, rather than a single individual....The family, in turn, in embedded within a larger cultural, community, and social context....These explorations of context will give us a broader view of how caregiving occurs. It will help us improve our theories about care and about the family's role in contemporary society....Care of our elders is an enduring and yet evolving part of life. The focus on context will help us understand, support and learn from the ways that families meet the challenges involved."--from the foreword by Steve H. Zarit, PhD, Professor and Head, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Pennsylvania State University Here, in Caregiving Contexts, the editors and their chapter authors explore the ways in which demographic change will influence the availability of caregivers and how divergent welfare and ideological systems will affect care among family members and between family and formal care systems. They also discuss the differences in experience between spousal and adult child caregivers, special circumstances such as child or adolescent caregivers, and government and workplace policies that are available to support caregivers in the United States and in some European countries. No other volume is available on caregiving which explores the sociocultural, familial, and sociopolitical contexts that effect both care decisions and outcomes.

Health Communication In The 21st Century

Author: Kevin B. Wright
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118339835
Size: 13,32 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This popular and engaging text on health communication is now revised and updated in a second edition that incorporates recent research and boasts new material on topics such as crisis communication, social disparities in health, and systemic reform. Fully revised second edition of this popular and authoritative text Includes fresh material on topics such as crisis communication, health care reform, global health issues, and political issues in health communication New case studies, examples, and updated glossary keep the work relevant and student-friendly Provides effective strategies for healthcare organizations and individuals in communicating with patients Updated and enhanced online resources, including PowerPoint slides, test bank, and instructors manual, available upon publication at www.wiley.com/go/wright

Family Caregiving Across The Lifespan

Author: Eva Kahana
Editor: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 145225401X
Size: 18,10 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Examining caregiving issues from a multigenerational, family life cycle perspective, this volume deals with the broad spectrum of chronic illnesses that necessitate family caregiving throughout the lifespan and discusses responses to these challenges by both caregiving families and caregiving systems. Part One addresses the caregiving paradigm and the relationship of family caregiving research to family life studies. Part Two examines conceptual aspects of caregiving, ranging from the expansion of the caregiving paradigm, caregiving processes and tasks, to the positive aspects of caregiving. Part Three emphasizes how family caregivers are affected by the connection (or lack of it) to macro-level systems.