Activism And Social Change

Author: Eric Shragge
Editor: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442606274
Size: 20,67 MB
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Drawing on over thirty years of experience in community development practice, Eric Shragge offers a unique historical perspective on activism, linking various forms of local organizing to the broader goal of fundamental social change. This new edition places contemporary community organizing in a post-9/11 context and includes a discussion of national and international organizing efforts—in the Middle East, in the Occupy movement, in European resistance to austerity measures, and in recent student protests in Quebec. A new chapter-length case study covering Shragge's long-term involvement with the Immigrant Workers Centre in Montreal offers one of the few English-language discussions of community organizing in Quebec. Activism and Social Change is an excellent core or supplementary text in courses on social movements, community organizing, or community development.

Progressive Community Organizing

Author: Loretta Pyles
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1136271503
Size: 15,86 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The second edition of Progressive Community Organizing offers a concise intellectual history of community organizing and social movements while also providing practical tools geared toward practitioner skill building. Drawing from social-constructionist, feminist and critical traditions, Progressive Community Organizing affirms the practice of issue framing and offers two innovative frameworks that will change the way students of organizing think about their work. Progressive Community Organizing is ideal for both undergraduate and graduate courses focused on community theory and practice, community organizing, community development, and social change and service learning. The second edition presents new case studies, including those of a welfare rights organization and a youth-led LGBTQ organization. There are also new sections on the capabilities approach, queer theory, the Civil Rights movement, and the practices of self-inquiry and non-violent communication. Discussion of global justice has been expanded significantly and includes an account of a transnational action-research project in post-earthquake Haiti. Each chapter contains discussion questions, written and web resources, and a list of key terms; a full, free-access companion website is also available for the book.

Community Organizing

Author: David S. Walls
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745688160
Size: 11,68 MB
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This incisive book provides a critical history and analysis of community organizing, the tradition of bringing groups together to build power and forge grassroots leadership for social, economic, racial, and environmental justice. Begun by Saul Alinsky in the 1930s, there are today nearly 200 institution-based groups active in 40 U.S. states, and the movement is spreading internationally. David Walls charts how community organizing has transcended the neighborhood to seek power and influence at the metropolitan, state, and national levels, together with such allies as unions and human rights advocates. Some organizing networks have embraced these goals while others have been more cautious, and the growing profile of community organizing has even charged political debate. Importantly, Walls engages social movements literature to bring insights to our understanding of community organizing networks, their methods, allies and opponents, and to show how community organizing offers concepts and tools that are indispensable to a democratic strategy of social change. Community Organizing will be essential reading for advanced undergraduates and graduate students of sociology, social movements and social work. It will also inform organizers and grassroots leaders, as well as the elected officials and others who contend with them.

An Interracial Movement Of The Poor

Author: Jennifer Frost
Editor: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814728680
Size: 15,24 MB
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Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2002 Community organizing became an integral part of the activist repertoire of the New Left in the 1960s. Students for a Democratic Society, the organization that came to be seen as synonymous with the white New Left, began community organizing in 1963, hoping to build an interracial movement of the poor through which to demand social and political change. SDS sought nothing less than to abolish poverty and extend democratic participation in America. Over the next five years, organizers established a strong presence in numerous low-income, racially diverse urban neighborhoods in Chicago, Cleveland, Newark, and Boston, as well as other cities. Rejecting the strategies of the old left and labor movement and inspired by the Civil Rights Movement, activists sought to combine a number of single issues into a broader, more powerful coalition. Organizers never limited themselves to today's simple dichotomies of race vs. class or of identity politics vs. economic inequality. They actively synthesized emerging identity politics with class and coalition politics and with a drive for a more participatory welfare state, treating these diverse political approaches as inextricably intertwined. While common wisdom holds that the New Left rejected all state involvement as cooptative at best, Jennifer Frost traces the ways in which New Left and community activists did in fact put forward a prescriptive, even visionary, alternative to the welfare state. After Students for a Democratic Society and its community organizing unit, the Economic Research and Action Project, disbanded, New Left and community participants went on to apply their strategies and goals to the welfare rights, women’s liberation, and the antiwar movements. In her study of activism before the age of identity politics, Frost has given us the first full-fledged history of what was arguably the most innovative community organizing campaign in post-war American history.

Youth Led Community Organizing

Author: Melvin Delgado
Editor: OUP USA
ISBN: 0195182766
Size: 17,66 MB
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Youth-led organizing is increasingly receiving attention from scholars, activists, and the media. Delgado and Staples have produced the first comprehensive study of this dynamic field. Their well-organized book takes an important step toward bridging the gap between academic knowledge and community practice in this growing area.

Organizing And Advocacy

Author: Loretta Pyles
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1135906238
Size: 10,27 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This interdisciplinary textbook offers a comprehensive view of the central issues facing progressive community organizers who seek to mobilize those negatively impacted by local, national, and global social policies and practices. Intended for both undergraduate and graduate students in social work, it aims to articulate the depth of the subject by introducing students to the philosophical, political, and sociological theories that inform community organizing and advocacy. These topics are explored in detail through such examples as the labour movement, environmental organizing, feminist movements, and faith-based movements as a way to inform social work community practice. The author emphasizes the importance of a thorough understanding of why and how people get together to effect change in their own communities. Ongoing debates and controversies that face organizers and advocates in the social work profession are also considered. Each chapter includes relevant discussion questions for reflection, as well as a list of useful books and websites for further inquiry. Also included are numerous case studies from community efforts in Post-Katrina New Orleans, many of which the author has been involved in herself, providing a recent and widely recognized series of real world examples that will be easily accessible for students and professors around the world.

Community And Organization In The New Left 1962 1968

Author: Wini Breines
Editor: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813514031
Size: 20,26 MB
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A Theology Of Community Organizing

Author: Chris Shannahan
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1134737408
Size: 15,38 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The rising importance of community organizing in the US and more recently in Britain has coincided with the developing significance of social movements and identity politics, debates about citizenship, social capital, civil society, and religion in the public sphere. At a time when participation in formal political process and membership of faith groups have both declined dramatically, community organizing has provided a new opportunity for small community groups, marginalized urban communities, and people of faith to engage in effective political action through the developments of inter-faith and cross-cultural coalitions of groups. In spite of its renewed popularity, little critical attention has been paid to community organizing. This book places community organizing within debates about the role of religion in the public sphere and the rise of public theology in recent years. The book explores the history, methodology, and achievements of community organizing, engaging in a series of conversations with key community organizers in the US and Britain. This volume breaks new ground by beginning to articulate a cross-cultural and inter-faith ‘Theology for Community Organizing’ that arises from fresh readings of Liberation Theology.

Handbook Of Community Movements And Local Organizations

Author: Ram A. Cnaan
Editor: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 0387329331
Size: 16,25 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Although the way associations and the organization of local social life are intertwined is one of the oldest approaches to community study, the way citizens and residents come together informally to act and solve problems has rarely been a primary focus. Associations are central to important and developing areas of social theory and social action. This handbook takes voluntary associations as the starting point for making sense of communities. It offers a new perspective on voluntary organizations and gives an integrated, yet diverse, theoretical understanding of this important aspect of community life.

Gendered Paradoxes

Author: Amy Lind
Editor: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271045744
Size: 12,50 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Since the early 1980s Ecuador has experienced a series of events unparalleled in its history. Its &“free market&” strategies exacerbated the debt crisis, and in response new forms of social movement organizing arose among the country&’s poor, including women&’s groups. Gendered Paradoxes focuses on women&’s participation in the political and economic restructuring process of the past twenty-five years, showing how in their daily struggle for survival Ecuadorian women have both reinforced and embraced the neoliberal model yet also challenged its exclusionary nature. Drawing on her extensive ethnographic fieldwork and employing an approach combining political economy and cultural politics, Amy Lind charts the growth of several strands of women&’s activism and identifies how they have helped redefine, often in contradictory ways, the real and imagined boundaries of neoliberal development discourse and practice. In her analysis of this ambivalent and &“unfinished&” cultural project of modernity in the Andes, she examines state policies and their effects on women of various social sectors; women&’s community development initiatives and responses to the debt crisis; and the roles played by feminist &“issue networks&” in reshaping national and international policy agendas in Ecuador and in developing a transnationally influenced, locally based feminist movement.