Constructing Indian Christianities

Author: Chad M. Bauman
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317560264
Size: 19,14 MB
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This volume offers insights into the current ‘public-square’ debates on Indian Christianity. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork as well as rigorous analyses, it discusses the myriad histories of Christianity in India, its everyday practice and contestations and the process of its indigenisation. It addresses complex and pertinent themes such as Dalit Indian Christianity, diasporic nationalism and conversion. The work will interest scholars and researchers of religious studies, Dalit and subaltern studies, modern Indian history, and politics.

Vernacular Catholicism Vernacular Saints

Author: Reid B. Locklin
Editor: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438465068
Size: 18,27 MB
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A collection of Raj’s groundbreaking ethnographic studies of “vernacular” Catholic traditions in Tamil Nadu, India. At the turn of the twenty-first century, Selva J. Raj (1952–2008) was one of the most important scholars of popular Indian Christianity and South Asian religion in North America. Vernacular Catholicism, Vernacular Saints gathers together, for the first time in a single volume, a series of his groundbreaking studies on the distinctively “vernacular” Catholic traditions of Tamil Nadu in southeast India. This collection, which focuses on four rural shrines, highlights ritual variety and ritual transgression in Tamil Catholic practice and offers clues to the ritual exchange, religious hybridity, and dialogue occurring at the grassroots level between Tamil Catholics and their Hindu and Muslim neighbors. Raj also advances a new and alternative paradigm for interreligious dialogue that radically differs from models advocated by theologians, clergy, and other religious elite. In addition, essays by other leading scholars of Indian Christianity and South Asian religions—Michael Amaladoss, Purushottama Bilimoria, Corinne G. Dempsey, Eliza F. Kent, and Vasudha Narayanan—are included that amplify and creatively extend Raj’s work. “…a fine volume about the interaction between Hinduism and Christianity in South India.” — from the Afterword by Wendy Doniger

Hindu Christian Faqir

Author: Timothy S. Dobe
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190463570
Size: 15,38 MB
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In the mid-nineteenth century, the American missionary James Butler predicted that Christian conversion and British law together would eradicate Indian ascetics. His disgust for Hindu holy men (sadhus), whom he called "saints," "yogis," and "filthy fakirs," was largely shared by orientalist scholars and British officials, who likewise imagined these religious elites to be a leading symptom of India's degeneration. Yet within some thirty years of Butler's writing, modern Indian ascetics such as the neo-Vedantin Hindu Swami Rama Tirtha (1873-1906) and, paradoxically, the Protestant Christian convert Sadhu Sundar Singh (1889-1929) achieved international fame as embodiments of the spiritual superiority of the East over the West. Timothy S. Dobe's fine-grained account of the lives of Sundar Singh and Rama Tirtha offers a window on the surprising reversals and potentials of Indian ascetic "sainthood" in the colonial contact zone. His study develops a new model of Indian holy men that is historicized, religiously pluralistic, and located within the tensions and intersections of ascetic practice and modernity. The first in-depth account of two internationally-recognized modern holy men in the colonially-crucial region of Punjab, Hindu Christian Faqir offers new examples and contexts for thinking through these wider issues. Drawing on unexplored Urdu writings by and about both figures, Dobe argues not only that Hinduism and Protestant Christianity are here intimately linked, but that these links are forged from the stuff of regional Islamic traditions of Sufi holy men (faqir). He also re-conceives Indian sainthood through an in-depth examination of ascetic practice as embodied religion, public performance, and relationship, rather than as a theological, otherworldly, and isolated ideal.

Pentecostals Proselytization And Anti Christian Violence In Contemporary India

Author: Chad M. Bauman
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190266317
Size: 18,44 MB
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Every year, there are several hundred attacks on India's Christians. These attacks are carried out by violent anti-minority activists, many of them provoked by what they perceive to be a Christian propensity for aggressive proselytization, or by rumored or real conversions to the faith. Pentecostals are disproportionately targeted. Drawing on extensive interviews, ethnographic work, and a vast scholarly literature on interreligious violence, Hindu nationalism, and Christianity in India, Chad Bauman examines this phenomenon. While some of the factors in the targeting of Pentecostals are obvious and expected-their relatively greater evangelical assertiveness, for instance-other significant factors are less acknowledged and more surprising: marginalization of Pentecostals by "mainstream" Christians, the social location of Pentecostal Christians, and transnational flows of missionary personnel, theories, and funds. A detailed analysis of Indian Christian history, contemporary Indian politics, Indian social and cultural characteristics, and Pentecostal belief and practice, this volume sheds important light on a troubling fact of contemporary Indian life.

Caste Catholic Christianity And The Language Of Conversion

Author: S. Jeyaseela Stephen
Editor: Gyan Publishing House
ISBN: 9788178356860
Size: 16,13 MB
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Based on a wide range of published sources, archival material and field data, this book is an in-depth study of the Portuguese Christian, missions and missionaries in the Tamil coast and hinterland between 1519 and 1774. It presents a fresh analysis on the theme of the Portuguese contribution to Tamil language and printing press. The book presents the best socio-historical and missionary study of Christianity for understanding the history of the Tamil Society.

Construction Of The Other Identification Of The Self

Author: Martin Tamcke
Editor: LIT Verlag Münster
ISBN: 3643902603
Size: 15,68 MB
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This volume of diverse contributions revisits the European religious construction of the Indian Other. In their attempt to identify their European Self, missionaries from Germany constructed India as their Other and archived such constructions. Such archival narratives epitomize the conviction of these missionaries in their Christian faith and their belief in the superiority of the European Self. These narratives, however, provide readers (for whose eyes they were not meant originally) with spaces to locate their own past and to identify their own Self. (Series: Studies on Oriental Church History / Studien zur Orientalischen Kirchengeschichte - Vol. 45)

Christianity And Conversion In India

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
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Christianity And Culture Change In India

Author: Keshari N. Sahay
Editor: Stosius Incorporated/Advent Books Division
ISBN:
Size: 13,95 MB
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Study relates mainly to the Oraons of Chotanagpur in Bihar.

Indian Christianity

Author: A. V. Afonso
Editor: Centre for Studies in civilizations
ISBN:
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Contributed articles.

The Future Of Christian Mission In India

Author: Augustine Kanjamala
Editor: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 163087485X
Size: 19,72 MB
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Colonial missionaries, both Catholic and Protestant, arrived in India with the grandiose vision of converting the pagans because, like St. Peter (Acts 4:12) and most of the church fathers, they honestly believed that there is no salvation outside the church (extra ecclesiam nulla salus). At the end of the "great Protestant century," however, Christians made up less than 3 percent of the population in India, and the hope of the missionary was nearly shattered. But if one looks at mission in India qualitatively rather than quantitatively, one sees a number of positive outcomes. Missionaries in India, particularly Protestant missionaries espousing the social gospel, in collaboration with a few British evangelical administrators, dared to challenge numerous social evils and even began to eradicate them. The scientific and liberal English education began to enlighten and transform the Indian mindset. Converts belonging to the upper caste, although small in number, laid the foundation stone of Indian theology and an inculturated church using Indian genius. The end of colonialism in India coincided with the painful death of colonial mission theology. Now, the power of the Word of God, extricated from political power, is slowly and peacefully gaining ground, like the mustard seed of the parable. A paradigm shift from the ecclesio-centric mission to missio Dei offers reason for further optimism. In short, the future of mission in India is as bright as the kingdom of God. In today's new context, theologians, despite objections from some quarters, are struggling to discover the Asian face of Jesus, disfigured by the Greco-Roman Church. And the missionary is challenged to become a living Bible that, undoubtedly, everyone will read.