Course Correction

Author: Ginny Gilder
Editor: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807074780
Size: 18,74 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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“Beautiful and important on many levels, Course Correction is about rowing and so much more . . . Ultimately it is about the transforming power of love, and, damnit all, it made me cry.”—Daniel James Brown, author of The Boys in the Boat “Written with poetic grace and true grit . . . A powerful testament to the impact of sport on our lives.”—Billie Jean King Wild meets The Boys in the Boat, a memoir about the quest for Olympic gold and the triumph of love over fear Forty years ago, when a young Ginny Gilder stood on the edge of Boston’s Charles River and first saw a rowing shell in motion, it was love at first sight. Yearning to escape her family history, which included her mother’s emotional unraveling and her father’s singular focus on investment acumen as the ultimate trophy, Gilder discovered rowing at a pivotal moment in her life. Having grown up in an era when girls were only beginning to abandon the sidelines as observers and cheerleaders to become competitors and national champions, Gilder harbored no dreams of athletic stardom. Once at Yale, however, her operating assumptions changed nearly overnight when, as a freshman in 1975, she found her way to the university’s rowing tanks in the gymnasium’s cavernous basement. From her first strokes as a novice, Gilder found herself in a new world, training with Olympic rowers and participating in the famous Title IX naked protest, which helped define the movement for equality in college sports. Short, asthmatic, and stubborn, Gilder made the team against all odds and for the next ten years devoted herself to answering a seemingly simple question: how badly do you want to go fast? Course Correction recounts the physical and psychological barriers Gilder overcame as she transformed into an elite athlete who reached the highest echelon of her sport. Set against the backdrop of unprecedented cultural change, Gilder’s story personalizes the impact of Title IX, illustrating the life-changing lessons learned in sports but felt far beyond the athletic arena. Heartfelt and candid, Gilder recounts lessons learned from her journey as it wends its way from her first glimpse of an oar to the Olympic podium in 1984, carries her through family tragedy, strengthens her to accept her true sexual identity, and ultimately frees her to live her life on her terms. From the Hardcover edition.

Drawn To The Rhythm A Passionate Life Reclaimed

Author: Sara Hall
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393324540
Size: 19,83 MB
Format: PDF
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Describes how the author's determination to master the art of rowing a single shell helped her escape her marriage to a wealthy but abusive husband and overcome the haunting memories of childhood sexual abuse, as she pursued her goal of becoming a champion in the sport of competitive rowing. Reprint.

Rowing To Latitude

Author: Jill Fredston
Editor: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780865476554
Size: 17,15 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The author recalls her many adventures as she explored the coasts of Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Spitsbergen, and Norway in her ocean-worthy rowing shell.

Kelly

Author: Daniel Boyne
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 076278928X
Size: 13,36 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Winner of the 2008 Premier Book Award for best biography The son of Irish immigrants who grew up along the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia at the turn of the twentieth century, Jack Kelly became a three-time gold medal Olympian, a political maverick, and the millionaire father of a princess. In this classic American tale of grit and perseverance, the clash between old world privilege and new world courage is played out on many fronts—including the watery battlefield of rowing, where Kelly first chose to forge his strength of character. Author Daniel J. Boyne follows the life of Kelly as he parlays his athletic prowess to France during WWI and then ventures into Philadelphia politics during the Great Depression. Readers are introduced to other members of the Kelly clan, including Jack’s brothers, Walter and George, who ascend to international acclaim in the world of theater, not to mention his daughter Grace, who seeks to follow in their footsteps against her father’s will, and his son, Jack Kelly Jr., upon whose shoulders is laid the greatest challenge of all—to carry on the Kelly tradition of championship rowing. Featuring more than thirty gorgeous historical photographs, Kelly is an uplifting true story of a real champion’s profound success in sport and life.

Red Rose Crew

Author: Daniel Boyne
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1461748836
Size: 16,28 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In 1975, a group of amazing women rowed their way to international success and glory, battling sexual prejudice, bureaucracy, and male domination in one of the most grueling and competitive sports around. Among the members of the first international women’s crew team--and one of the first women’s teams anywhere--were Gail Pearson, the soft-spoken MIT professor who fought equally hard off the water to win the political battles neccessary for her team to succeed; lead rower Carie Graves, a statuesque bohemian from rural Wisconsin who dropped out of college and later became the most intense rower of the crew; and Lynn Stillman, a tiny sixteen-year-old coxswain from California. On hand to guide them was Harry Parker, the legendary Harvard men’s crew coach who overcame his doubts about the ability of women to withstand the rigors of hard training. From their first dramatic bid at the 1975 World Championships to their preparations for their first Olympic Games in 1976, this gripping story of bravery, determination, and indomitable spirit captures a compelling moment in the history of sports and of America.

Small Puddles

Author: Michael P. Danziger
Editor:
ISBN: 9780998285214
Size: 12,62 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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NOT a story of overcoming every obstacle to climb to glory. No, it's the story of a guy with every advantage who, despite total dedication to his chosen sport, never emerges from athletic mediocrity. It's the story of how that dedication, that experience of NOT QUITTING, shaped a man who would go on to lead an unconventional life of consequence.

Flat Water Tuesday

Author: Ron Irwin
Editor: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250030021
Size: 11,80 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The son of a working-class cabinet maker, Rob Carrey arrives on the prestigious Fenton School's campus with a scholarship to row...and a chip on his shoulder. Generations of austere Fenton men have led the four-man rowing team, commonly known as the God Four, to countless victories—but none more important or renowned than the annual Tuesday afternoon race in April against their rival boarding school, Warwick. Before boats can be launched, Rob must complete months of grueling preparation driven by their captain Connor Payne's vicious competitive nature. Payne is a young man so plagued by family pressure and uwillingness to lose that the lines between dedication and obsession are increasingly blurred. As the Warwick race nears, the stakes steadfastly rise, and tempers and lusts culminate until, finally, no one can prevent the horrible tragedy that ensues. Now, fifteen years later, Rob is an accomplished documentary filmmaker. Returning home from a recent shoot in Africa, he arrives in New York City to clear out his shared apartment and end his heartbreaking relationship with his film editor and girlfriend, Carolyn. But when a phone call from one of the God Four compels him to attend the fifteen-year reunion at Fenton, Rob sees the invitation as an opportunity to confront the past and perhaps even steer his own life in a new direction. Ron Irwin's Flat Water Tuesday shares in the grand tradition of sagas about athletic young men on the brink of greatness, who either embrace their talent or are devastatingly consumed by it. As much about the art of rowing as it is a novel of finding oneself, this is a memorable and deeply moving testament to what it means to train and fight for both love and victory, in sport and in life.

The Reappearing Act

Author: Kate Fagan
Editor: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1629143014
Size: 13,56 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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It’s hard enough coming out, but playing basketball for a nationally ranked school and trying to figure out your sexual identity in the closeted and paranoid world of big-time college sports—that’s a challenge. Kate Fagan’s love for basketball and for her religious teammates at the University of Colorado was tested by the gut-wrenching realization that she could no longer ignore the feelings of otherness inside her. In trying to blend in, Kate had created a hilariously incongruous world for herself in Boulder. Her best friends were part of Colorado’s Fellowship of Christian Athletes, where they ran weekly Bible studies and attended an Evangelical Free Church. For nearly a year, Kate joined them and learned all she could about Christianity—even holding their hands as they prayed for others “living a sinful lifestyle.” Each time the issue of homosexuality arose, she felt as if a neon sign appeared over her head, with a giant arrow pointed downward. During these prayer sessions, she would often keep her eyes open, looking around the circle at the closed eyelids of her friends, listening to the earnestness of their words. Kate didn’t have a vocabulary for discussing who she really was and what she felt when she was younger; all she knew was that she had a secret. In The Reappearing Act, she brings the reader along for the ride as she slowly accepts her new reality and takes the first steps toward embracing her true self.

Stop Drifting Start Rowing

Author: Roz Savage
Editor: Hay House, Inc
ISBN: 1401942636
Size: 12,45 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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In 2007, Roz Savage set out to row 8,000 miles across the Pacific Ocean—alone. Despite having successfully rowed across the Atlantic the previous year, the Pacific presented the former office worker with unprecedented challenges and overpowering currents—both in the water and within herself. Crossing Earth’s largest ocean alone might seem a long way removed from everyday life, yet the lessons Roz learned about the inner journey, the ocean, and the world are relevant to all of us. She shares tales of the ups and downs of her voyage across the waves, while offering insights on how to find happiness through a meaningful and rewarding life.

My Olympic Life

Author: Anita L. DeFrantz
Editor: BookBaby
ISBN: 0999231901
Size: 12,74 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Growing up in a family active in promoting civil rights, Anita L. DeFrantz knew the importance of letting her voice be heard as an African American and as a woman. Her activism for individual rights and her ascent as a leader began in earnest at Connecticut College, where she was sophomore class president, chairman of the student judiciary committee her junior year, author of a student bill of rights, and a house fellow, supervising student dorm residents her senior year. At commencement in 1974, she was elected a trustee of the college by her class. Eventually, she would serve as a Connecticut College trustee for 24 years. In college, DeFrantz found that she was a natural for the new and exciting sport of rowing, with its focus on teamwork. She continued her rowing training throughout law school and during her early career as an attorney. She competed in the 1976 Olympic Games in Montréal, which was the first time women’s rowing was on the program of the Olympic Games, and raced to a bronze medal in the U.S. 8-oared shell with coxswain. From the start of her involvement in the Olympic community, DeFrantz found a new direction for her voice: to be the champion of athletes everywhere. Her rowing background and experience as an Olympian – matched with her legal training, powers of persuasion, and passion for equality and inclusion – propelled her to speak out on behalf of Olympians. In the process, she gained access, and eventually leadership, at the upper echelons of the Olympic world, where she remains to this day, fighting for equality in sports and promoting the Olympic ideal of “mutual respect and fair play.” Named by Newsweek as one of the “150 Women Who Shake the World” and Sports Illustrated as one of the “101 Most Influential Minorities in Sports,” DeFrantz has used her platform in the Olympic Movement to advance fairness in sports. She’s fought sexual harassment, helped change outdated gender verification rules, pushed forward the introduction of women’s events, including Olympic soccer and softball teams, cracked down on doping, influenced new eligibility requirements, and more. With unwavering tenacity, she even took on President Jimmy Carter when he used Olympic athletes as leverage in the Cold War. In My Olympic Life, readers will journey with an African-American youngster from racially-charged and segregated Indianapolis in the 1950s and ’60s, who went to a high school with no sports for girls, as she grows up to be a member of the first women’s U.S. Olympic rowing team and wins a bronze medal in the 1976 Montréal Olympic Games. They will then see how her Olympic experience galvanized her to become an active member in national and international sport and Olympic organizations, including becoming the first woman vice president of both FISA (the International Rowing Federation) and the International Olympic Committee. Her story is more than a civil rights and sporting victory for one person. It reveals how with grit, determination and passion, one person can change the game positively for all.