Culture Of Honor

Author: Richard E Nisbett
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 0429980779
Size: 11,97 MB
Format: PDF
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This is an exploration of the reasons behind the higher rate for homicides among whites in the southern United States. The authors conclude that what makes the difference is not socio-economic class, population density, the legacy of slavery, or the heat of the South, but the traditional "culture of honour", in which a man's reputation is seen as central to his economic survival.

Paul Ricoeur And The Task Of Political Philosophy

Author: Greg S. Johnson
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0739167731
Size: 11,34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book offers a sustained engagement with the political philosophy of Paul Ricoeur and demonstrates both the significance of the political in his own thinking throughout his career, and how his understanding of the political offers something valuable to current discussions of issues in political philosophy.

Honor Bound

Author: Ryan P. Brown
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199399883
Size: 13,12 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"Culture of honor" is what social scientists call a society that organizes social life around maintaining and defending reputation. In an honor culture, because reputation is everything, people will go to great lengths to defend their reputations and those of their family members against real and perceived threats and insults. While most human societies throughout history can be described as "honor cultures," the United States is particularly well known for having a deeply rooted culture of honor, especially in the American South and West. In Honor Bound, social psychologist Ryan P. Brown integrates social science research, current events, and personal stories to explore and explain how honor underpins nearly every aspect of our lives, from spontaneous bar fights to organized acts of terrorism, romantic relationships, mental health and well-being, unsportsmanlike conduct in football, the commission of suicide, foreign policy decisions by political leaders, and even how parents name their babies. Sometimes the effects of living in an honor culture are subtle and easily missed-there are fewer nursing homes in the American south, as more parents live with their children as they age-and sometimes the effects are more dramatic, as in the fact that there are more school shootings in honor states, but they are always relevant. By illuminating a surprising and pervasive thread that has endured in our culture for centuries, Brown's narrative will captivate those raised in these types of honor cultures who wish to understand themselves, and those who wish to better understand their neighbors.

Blood In The Hills

Author: Bruce Stewart
Editor: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813134277
Size: 14,70 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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To many antebellum Americans, Appalachia was a frightening wilderness of lawlessness, peril, robbers, and hidden dangers. The extensive media coverage of horse stealing and scalping raids profiled the regionÕs residents as intrinsically violent. After the Civil War, this characterization continued to permeate perceptions of the area and news of the conflict between the Hatfields and the McCoys, as well as the bloodshed associated with the coal labor strikes, cemented AppalachiaÕs violent reputation. Blood in the Hills: A History of Violence in Appalachia provides an in-depth historical analysis of hostility in the region from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century. Editor Bruce E. Stewart discusses aspects of the Appalachian violence culture, examining skirmishes with the native population, conflicts resulting from the regionÕs rapid modernization, and violence as a function of social control. The contributors also address geographical isolation and ethnicity, kinship, gender, class, and race with the purpose of shedding light on an often-stereotyped regional past. Blood in the Hills does not attempt to apologize for the region but uses detailed research and analysis to explain it, delving into the social and political factors that have defined Appalachia throughout its violent history.

Honor And Violence In The Old South

Author: Bertram Wyatt-Brown
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195042429
Size: 19,22 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Looks at codes of honor in the antebellum South, explains how it was used to defend slavery, and looks at public ethics in the South

Social Psychology Of Visual Perception

Author: Emily Balcetis
Editor: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1136945539
Size: 15,78 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This volume synthesizes social, cognitive, ecological, evolutionary, and neuroscience research, demonstrating that the way in which people literally perceive the world changes with their cognitions, emotions, goals, motivations, culture, surroundings, and other factors traditionally considered exclusive to social, personality, and cognitive psychology.

Handbook Of Aggressive Behavior Research

Author: Caitriona Quin
Editor: Nova Science Pub Incorporated
ISBN:
Size: 12,37 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Aggression is a complex social behaviour with multiple causes. In psychology, as well as other social and behavioural sciences, aggression refers to behaviour between members of the same species that is intended to cause pain or harm. Aggression takes a variety of forms among humans and can be physical, mental, or verbal. Aggression should not be confused with assertiveness however, although the terms are often used interchangeably. There are two broad categories of aggression. These include hostile, affective, or retaliatory aggression and instrumental, predatory, or goal-oriented aggression. Empirical research indicates that there is a critical difference between the two, both psychologically and physiologically. Some research indicates that people with tendencies toward affective aggression have lower IQs than those with tendencies toward predatory aggression. If only considering physical aggression, males tend to be more aggressive than females. This new book gathers the latest research from around the world in this field.

Relative Justice

Author: Tamler Sommers
Editor: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691139938
Size: 19,39 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Drawing on research in anthropology, psychology, and a host of other disciplines, this book argues that cross-cultural variation raises serious problems for theories that propose universally applicable conditions for moral responsibility. It develops a way of thinking about responsibility that takes cultural diversity into account.

Ghost Of The Ozarks

Author: Brooks Blevins
Editor: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252094118
Size: 20,95 MB
Format: PDF
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In 1929, in a remote county of the Arkansas Ozarks, the gruesome murder of harmonica-playing drifter Connie Franklin and the brutal rape of his teenaged fiancé captured the attention of a nation on the cusp of the Great Depression. National press from coast to coast ran stories of the sensational exploits of night-riding moonshiners, powerful "Barons of the Hills," and a world of feudal oppression in the isolation of the rugged Ozarks. The ensuing arrest of five local men for both crimes and the confusion and superstition surrounding the trial and conviction gave Stone County a dubious and short-lived notoriety. Closely examining how the story and its regional setting were interpreted by the media, Brooks Blevins recounts the gripping events of the murder investigation and trial, where a man claiming to be the murder victim--the "Ghost" of the Ozarks--appeared to testify. Local conditions in Stone County, which had no electricity and only one long-distance telephone line, frustrated the dozen or more reporters who found their way to the rural Ozarks, and the developments following the arrests often prompted reporters' caricatures of the region: accusations of imposture and insanity, revelations of hidden pasts and assumed names, and threats of widespread violence. Ghost of the Ozarks: Murder and Memory in the Upland South entertains readers with a dramatic tale of true crime as well as a skilled interpretation of the region. Throughout this narrative, Blevins weaves a sophisticated social history of the Ozarks in the early twentieth century, critically analyzing the stereotypes and imagery inherent in local folklore and embedded in media coverage of the murder and trial. Locating the past of the Upland South squarely within the major currents of American history, Blevins paints a convincing backdrop to a story that, more than 80 years later, remains riddled with mystery and a source of bitter division in the community where some believe Connie Franklin met his end.

The Oxford Handbook Of Evolutionary Perspectives On Violence Homicide And War

Author: Todd K. Shackelford
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199738408
Size: 11,96 MB
Format: PDF
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The Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Perspectives on Violence, Homicide, and War synthesizes the theoretical and empirical work of leading scholars in the evolutionary sciences to produce the first extensive and authoritative review of this literature. Its breadth of coverage is unique, and ensures that the handbook provides essential reading for students and researchers in the fields of psychology, anthropology, criminology, sociology, ethology, biology, and behavioral ecology.