Evolutionary Arguments On Aging Disease And Other Topicsn Aging

Author: Giacinto Libertini
Editor: Azinet
ISBN: 0978870921
Size: 13,94 MB
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Every character of a living being has its function: the teeth are there to chew, the lungs to breathe, the eyes to see, etc. But what is the function of aging, if there even is one?If it is true that the living being is modelled by natural selection, what are the evolutionary needs that bring about limited longevity or variable longevity according to the species? Why does a mouse live less than two years, a tortoise many tens of years and Pinus Aristata not seem to age at all? Are these differences casual or is evolution somehow at the origin of it all, as A. Weismann hypothesized back in the last century?The results are beyond all expectations: it is possible to provide an explanation for the "why of senescence in evolutionary terms.Another important topic is the meaning of disease phenomenon in the context of evolutionary theory. Illness is a set of phenomena that is perfectly anticipated and rationally classifiable by evolutionary theory.This book, printed in Italian in 1983, broached these and other questions with a rigorous evolutionary approach, using mathematical models in its arguments for the graphic expression and the confirmation of the models.

Evolutionary Interpretations Of Aging Disease Phenomenon And Sex

Author: Giacinto Libertini
Editor: Copernican editions
ISBN: 8890648600
Size: 10,33 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Evolution Of Aging

Author: Theodore C. Goldsmith
Editor: Azinet
ISBN: 0978870905
Size: 19,63 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Goldsmith provides a historical review of biological aging theories including underlying evolution and genetics issues and describes exciting recent discoveries and new theories that are causing renewed interest in aging-by-design.

Aging And Health A Systems Biology Perspective

Author: A.I. Yashin
Editor: Karger Medical and Scientific Publishers
ISBN: 3318027308
Size: 12,90 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Aging is a major risk factor for chronic diseases, which in turn can provide information about the aging of a biological system. This publication serves as an introduction to systems biology and its application to biological aging. Key pathways and processes that impinge on aging are reviewed, and how they contribute to health and disease during aging is discussed. The evolution of this situation is analyzed, and the consequences for the study of genetic effects on aging are presented. Epigenetic programming of aging, as a continuation of development, creates an interface between the genome and the environment. New research into the gut microbiome describes how this interface may operate in practice with marked consequences for a variety of disorders. This analysis is bolstered by a view of the aging organism as a whole, with conclusions about the mechanisms underlying resilience of the organism to change, and is expanded with a discussion of circadian rhythms in aging. Finally, the book presents an outlook for the development of interventions to delay or to reverse the features of aging. The publication is recommended to students, researchers as well as professionals dealing with public health and public policy related to an aging society.

Aging

Author: L. Robert
Editor: Karger Medical and Scientific Publishers
ISBN: 3318026530
Size: 11,12 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Aging inspired a large number of theories trying to rationalize the aging process common to all living beings. In this publication the most important environmental and intrinsic mechanisms involved in the aging process and in its pathological consequences are reviewed. Furthermore theoretical and experimental evidence of the most important theoretical elements based on Darwinian evolution, cellular aging, role of cell membranes, free radicals and oxidative processes, receptor-mediated reactions, the extracellular matrix and immune functions as well as the most important environmental and intrinsic mechanisms involved in the aging process and in its pathological consequences are discussed. These presentations of theories and related experimental facts give a global overview of up to date concepts of the biology of the aging process and are of essential reading not only for specialists in this field but also for practitioners of scientific, medical, social and experimental sciences.

How Men Age

Author: Richard G. Bribiescas
Editor: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400883261
Size: 13,10 MB
Format: PDF
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While the health of aging men has been a focus of biomedical research for years, evolutionary biology has not been part of the conversation—until now. How Men Age is the first book to explore how natural selection has shaped male aging, how evolutionary theory can inform our understanding of male health and well-being, and how older men may have contributed to the evolution of some of the very traits that make us human. In this informative and entertaining book, renowned biological anthropologist Richard Bribiescas looks at all aspects of male aging through an evolutionary lens. He describes how the challenges males faced in their evolutionary past influenced how they age today, and shows how this unique evolutionary history helps explain common aspects of male aging such as prostate disease, loss of muscle mass, changes in testosterone levels, increases in fat, erectile dysfunction, baldness, and shorter life spans than women. Bribiescas reveals how many of the physical and behavioral changes that we negatively associate with male aging may have actually facilitated the emergence of positive traits that have helped make humans so successful as a species, including parenting, long life spans, and high fertility. Popular science at its most compelling, How Men Age provides new perspectives on the aging process in men and how we became human, and also explores future challenges for human evolution—and the important role older men might play in them.

The Story Of The Human Body

Author: Daniel Lieberman
Editor: Vintage
ISBN: 030774180X
Size: 14,72 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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In this book the author, a Harvard evolutionary biologist presents an account of how the human body has evolved over millions of years, examining how an increasing disparity between the needs of Stone Age bodies and the realities of the modern world are fueling a paradox of greater longevity and chronic disease. It illuminates the major transformations that contributed key adaptations to the body: the rise of bipedalism; the shift to a non-fruit-based diet; the advent of hunting and gathering, leading to our superlative endurance athleticism; the development of a very large brain; and the incipience of cultural proficiencies. The author also elucidates how cultural evolution differs from biological evolution, and how our bodies were further transformed during the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. While these ongoing changes have brought about many benefits, they have also created conditions to which our bodies are not entirely adapted, the author argues, resulting in the growing incidence of obesity and new but avoidable diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. The author proposes that many of these chronic illnesses persist and in some cases are intensifying because of 'dysevolution,' a pernicious dynamic whereby only the symptoms rather than the causes of these maladies are treated. And finally, he advocates the use of evolutionary information to help nudge, push, and sometimes even compel us to create a more salubrious environment. -- From publisher's web site.

The Biology Of Human Longevity

Author: Caleb E. Finch
Editor: Elsevier
ISBN: 9780080545943
Size: 10,69 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Written by Caleb Finch, one of the leading scientists of our time, The Biology of Human Longevity: Inflammation, Nutrition, and Aging in the Evolution of Lifespans synthesizes several decades of top research on the topic of human aging and longevity particularly on the recent theories of inflammation and its effects on human health. The book expands a number of existing major theories, including the Barker theory of fetal origins of adult disease to consider the role of inflammation and Harmon's free radical theory of aging to include inflammatory damage. Future increases in lifespan are challenged by the obesity epidemic and spreading global infections which may reverse the gains made in lowering inflammatory exposure. This timely and topical book will be of interest to anyone studying aging from any scientific angle. Author Caleb Finch is a highly influential and respected scientist, ranked in the top half of the 1% most cited scientists Provides a novel synthesis of existing ideas about the biology of longevity and aging Incorporates important research findings from several disciplines, including Gerontology, Genomics, Neuroscience, Immunology, Nutrition

Religion In Human Evolution

Author: Robert N. Bellah
Editor: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674063090
Size: 19,39 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This ambitious book probes our biological past to discover the kinds of lives that human beings have imagined were worth living. Bellah’s theory goes deep into cultural and genetic evolution to identify a range of capacities (communal dancing, storytelling, theorizing) whose emergence made religious development possible in the first millennium BCE.

Ageing Evidence

Author:
Editor: The Stationery Office
ISBN: 9780104007280
Size: 14,23 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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