Foodscapes Of Contemporary Japanese Women Writers

Author: M. Yuki
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137477237
Size: 17,83 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Translated from Japanese, this study exposes English-language scholars to the complexities of the relationship between food, culture, the environment, and literature in Japan. Yuki explores the systems of value surrounding food as expressed in four popular Japanese female writers: Ishimure Michiko, Taguchi Randy, Morisaki Kazue, and Nashiki Kaho.

Ecocritical Aesthetics

Author: Peter Quigley
Editor: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253032113
Size: 18,76 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This lively collection of essays explores the vital role of beauty in the human experience of place, interactions with other species, and contemplation of our own embodied lives. Devoting attention to themes such as global climate change, animal subjectivity, environmental justice and activism, and human moral responsibility for the environment, these contributions demonstrate that beauty is not only a meaningful dimension of our experience, but also a powerful strategy for inspiring cultural transformation. Taken as a whole, they underscore the ongoing relevance of aesthetics to the ecocritical project and the concern for beauty that motivates effective social and political engagement.

Handbook Of Ecocriticism And Cultural Ecology

Author: Hubert Zapf
Editor: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 3110394898
Size: 19,26 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Ecocriticism has emerged as one of the most fascinating and rapidly growing fields of recent literary and cultural studies. The volume maps some of the most important developments within contemporary Ecocriticism from a variety of different angles, approaches, areas, and perspectives. It introduces relevant theoretical concepts and demonstrates their relevance for the analysis of texts and other cultural phenomena.

The Medieval Flower Book

Author: Celia Fisher
Editor: British Library Board
ISBN: 9780712358941
Size: 16,52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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In this charming book Celia Fisher explores the beautiful flower illustration in medieval herbals and manuscripts, illustrating around 140 different flowers and plants in glorious full colour. Many of the illustrations come from herbals, in which plants began to be depicted with realism by artists in the 14th century. But in the 15th century a different kind of flower illustration emerged in the margins of illuminated manuscripts. From around 1480 flowers became the dominant feature of the decorative borders of Books of Hours created in the southern Netherlands. The wonderfully innovative style showed the flowers as if they had been plucked from their stems and scattered onto the page where they cast little trompe l'oeil shadows as if they were indeed three-dimensional. Flower lovers and those interested in medieval art and history will find this richly illustrated book informative, entertaining and, above all, a joy to behold.

Anthropocene Fictions

Author: Adam Trexler
Editor: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813936934
Size: 20,22 MB
Format: PDF
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Since the Industrial Revolution, humans have transformed the Earth’s atmosphere, committing our planet to more extreme weather, rising sea levels, melting polar ice caps, and mass extinction. This period of observable human impact on the Earth’s ecosystems has been called the Anthropocene Age. The anthropogenic climate change that has impacted the Earth has also affected our literature, but criticism of the contemporary novel has not adequately recognized the literary response to this level of environmental crisis. Ecocriticism’s theories of place and planet, meanwhile, are troubled by a climate that is neither natural nor under human control. Anthropocene Fictions is the first systematic examination of the hundreds of novels that have been written about anthropogenic climate change. Drawing on climatology, the sociology and philosophy of science, geography, and environmental economics, Adam Trexler argues that the novel has become an essential tool to construct meaning in an age of climate change. The novel expands the reach of climate science beyond the laboratory or model, turning abstract predictions into subjectively tangible experiences of place, identity, and culture. Political and economic organizations are also being transformed by their struggle for sustainability. In turn, the novel has been forced to adapt to new boundaries between truth and fabrication, nature and economies, and individual choice and larger systems of natural phenomena. Anthropocene Fictions argues that new modes of inhabiting climate are of the utmost critical and political importance, when unprecedented scientific consensus has failed to lead to action. Under the Sign of Nature: Explorations in Ecocriticism

Ecocriticism In Japan

Author: Hisaaki Wake
Editor: Ecocritical Theory and Practic
ISBN: 9781498527842
Size: 10,23 MB
Format: PDF
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Ecocriticism in Japan provides an answer to the question, "What can ecocriticism do when engaging with Japanese literature and culture?" Engaging works ranging from The Tale of Genji to Abe, Ōe, Ishimure, and Miyazaki, this volume examines works Japanese people and culture in terms of nature and environment.

A Global History Of Literature And The Environment

Author: John Parham
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108107680
Size: 10,43 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In A Global History of Literature and the Environment, an international group of scholars illustrate the immense riches of environmental writing from the earliest literary periods down to the present. It addresses ancient writings about human/animal/plant relations from India, classical Greece, Chinese and Japanese literature, the Maya Popol Vuh, Islamic texts, medieval European works, eighteenth-century and Romantic ecologies, colonial/postcolonial environmental interrelations, responses to industrialization, and the emerging literatures of the world in the present Anthropocene moment. Essays range from Trinidad to New Zealand, Estonia to Brazil. Discussion of these texts indicates a variety of ways environmental criticism can fruitfully engage literary works and cultures from every continent and every historical period. This is a uniquely varied and rich international history of environmental writing from ancient Mesopotamian and Asian works to the present. It provides a compelling account of a topic that is crucial to twenty-first-century global literary studies.

The Salvage Chef Cookbook

Author: Michael Love
Editor: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1632201135
Size: 13,28 MB
Format: PDF
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How much food do you throw away every day? The Salvage Chef Cookbook is far more than a book of 125 scrumptious recipes; it begins by demonstrating to readers how to both increase food shelf life and determine when food is truly spoiled. What then follows is a collection of easy recipes for cooks of all levels. Families throw away perfectly edible yet overlooked food every day, as they often aren’t savvy enough in the kitchen to stretch their hard-earned dollars and salvage the food they have in their refrigerators and pantries. How much time do you spend staring at last week’s groceries, wondering if you can make a hearty meal with half a box of rice, wilted spinach, or leftover grilled chicken? Can you incorporate those overripe bananas or week-old strawberries into a breakfast or dessert that will satisfy your family? According to Chef Michael Love, you can. Instead of running to the store or ordering take-out, you can more often than not make use of what you have on hand. The food in your kitchen can and should be salvaged. Chef Love’s recipes show you how to creatively transform what you currently have into surprising, delectable, and delicious family meals. Love also provides an accessible and innovative Salvage Index—a comprehensive list of both fresh and leftover items designed to help readers decide what meals they can prepare from the ingredients they have. The Salvage Chef Cookbook is a culinary must-have featuring old favorites reimagined through the use of salvaged food to create dishes both familiar and exciting. Skyhorse Publishing, along with our Good Books and Arcade imprints, is proud to publish a broad range of cookbooks, including books on juicing, grilling, baking, frying, home brewing and winemaking, slow cookers, and cast iron cooking. We’ve been successful with books on gluten-free cooking, vegetarian and vegan cooking, paleo, raw foods, and more. Our list includes French cooking, Swedish cooking, Austrian and German cooking, Cajun cooking, as well as books on jerky, canning and preserving, peanut butter, meatballs, oil and vinegar, bone broth, and more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

Paradise In The Sea Of Sorrow

Author: Michiko Ishimure
Editor: University of Michigan Center for
ISBN:
Size: 20,53 MB
Format: PDF
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Numbers And Nerves

Author: Scott Slovic
Editor:
ISBN: 9780870717765
Size: 15,66 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 365
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We live in the age of Big Data, awash in a sea of ever-expanding information--a constant deluge of facts, statistics, models, and projections. The human mind is quickly desensitized by information presented in the form of numbers, and yet many important social and environmental phenomena, ranging from genocide to global climate change, require quantitative description. The essays and interviews in Numbers and Nerves explore the quandary of our cognitive responses to quantitative information, while also offering compelling strategies for overcoming insensitivity to the meaning of such information. With contributions by journalists, literary critics, psychologists, naturalists, activists, and others, this book represents a unique convergence of psychological research, discourse analysis, and visual and narrative communication. At a time of unprecedented access to information, our society is frequently stymied in its efforts to react to the world's massive problems. Many of these problems are systemic, deeply rooted in seemingly intransigent cultural patterns and lifestyles. In order to sense the significance of these issues and begin to confront them, we must first understand the psychological tendencies that enable and restrict our processing of numerical information. Numbers and Nerves explores a wide range of psychological phenomena and communication strategies--fast and slow thinking, psychic numbing, pseudoinefficacy, the prominence effect, the asymmetry of trust, contextualized anecdotes, multifaceted mosaics of prose, and experimental digital compositions, among others--and places these in real-world contexts. In the past two decades, cognitive science has increasingly come to understand that we, as a species, think best when we allow numbers and nerves, abstract information and experiential discourse, to work together. This book provides a roadmap to guide that collaboration. It will be invaluable to scholars, educators, professional communicators, and anyone who struggles to grasp the meaning behind the numbers.