Foodscapes Of Contemporary Japanese Women Writers

Author: M. Yuki
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137477237
Size: 19,77 MB
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Translated from Japanese, this study exposes English-language scholars to the complexities of the relationship between food, culture, the environment, and literature in Japan. Yuki explores the systems of value surrounding food as expressed in four popular Japanese female writers: Ishimure Michiko, Taguchi Randy, Morisaki Kazue, and Nashiki Kaho.

Ecocritical Aesthetics

Author: Peter Quigley
Editor: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253032113
Size: 20,23 MB
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This lively collection of essays explores the vital role of beauty in the human experience of place, interactions with other species, and contemplation of our own embodied lives. Devoting attention to themes such as global climate change, animal subjectivity, environmental justice and activism, and human moral responsibility for the environment, these contributions demonstrate that beauty is not only a meaningful dimension of our experience, but also a powerful strategy for inspiring cultural transformation. Taken as a whole, they underscore the ongoing relevance of aesthetics to the ecocritical project and the concern for beauty that motivates effective social and political engagement.

Handbook Of Ecocriticism And Cultural Ecology

Author: Hubert Zapf
Editor: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 3110394898
Size: 18,83 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Ecocriticism has emerged as one of the most fascinating and rapidly growing fields of recent literary and cultural studies. The volume maps some of the most important developments within contemporary Ecocriticism from a variety of different angles, approaches, areas, and perspectives. It introduces relevant theoretical concepts and demonstrates their relevance for the analysis of texts and other cultural phenomena.

Anthropocene Fictions

Author: Adam Trexler
Editor: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813936934
Size: 13,62 MB
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Since the Industrial Revolution, humans have transformed the Earth’s atmosphere, committing our planet to more extreme weather, rising sea levels, melting polar ice caps, and mass extinction. This period of observable human impact on the Earth’s ecosystems has been called the Anthropocene Age. The anthropogenic climate change that has impacted the Earth has also affected our literature, but criticism of the contemporary novel has not adequately recognized the literary response to this level of environmental crisis. Ecocriticism’s theories of place and planet, meanwhile, are troubled by a climate that is neither natural nor under human control. Anthropocene Fictions is the first systematic examination of the hundreds of novels that have been written about anthropogenic climate change. Drawing on climatology, the sociology and philosophy of science, geography, and environmental economics, Adam Trexler argues that the novel has become an essential tool to construct meaning in an age of climate change. The novel expands the reach of climate science beyond the laboratory or model, turning abstract predictions into subjectively tangible experiences of place, identity, and culture. Political and economic organizations are also being transformed by their struggle for sustainability. In turn, the novel has been forced to adapt to new boundaries between truth and fabrication, nature and economies, and individual choice and larger systems of natural phenomena. Anthropocene Fictions argues that new modes of inhabiting climate are of the utmost critical and political importance, when unprecedented scientific consensus has failed to lead to action. Under the Sign of Nature: Explorations in Ecocriticism

The Medieval Flower Book

Author: Celia Fisher
Editor: British Library Board
ISBN: 9780712349451
Size: 15,60 MB
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In this delightful book, the author explores the "floral outburst" that occurred in medieval manuscripts of the 14th and 15th centuries.

Engendered

Author: Sam A. Andreades
Editor: Lexham Press
ISBN: 9781683591887
Size: 12,56 MB
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enGendered celebrates the God-given distinctions between a man and a woman. It concludes that the more distinction is embraced, the closer a man and woman become. Thus gender, rightly understood, is a tool for intimacy. Written in a compassionate tone and winsome style, the volume speaks to Christians who want to know what the Bible says about gender differences and why. This theology of gender is also of value for people who struggle with same-sex attraction but want to follow Christ.

A Global History Of Literature And The Environment

Author: John Parham
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108107680
Size: 11,39 MB
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In A Global History of Literature and the Environment, an international group of scholars illustrate the immense riches of environmental writing from the earliest literary periods down to the present. It addresses ancient writings about human/animal/plant relations from India, classical Greece, Chinese and Japanese literature, the Maya Popol Vuh, Islamic texts, medieval European works, eighteenth-century and Romantic ecologies, colonial/postcolonial environmental interrelations, responses to industrialization, and the emerging literatures of the world in the present Anthropocene moment. Essays range from Trinidad to New Zealand, Estonia to Brazil. Discussion of these texts indicates a variety of ways environmental criticism can fruitfully engage literary works and cultures from every continent and every historical period. This is a uniquely varied and rich international history of environmental writing from ancient Mesopotamian and Asian works to the present. It provides a compelling account of a topic that is crucial to twenty-first-century global literary studies.

Ecoambiguity

Author: Karen Thornber
Editor: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472028146
Size: 18,15 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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East Asian literatures are famous for celebrating the beauties of nature and depicting people as intimately connected with the natural world. But in fact, because the region has a long history of transforming and exploiting nature, much of the fiction and poetry in the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages portrays people as damaging everything from small woodlands to the entire planet. These texts seldom talk about environmental crises straightforwardly. Instead, like much creative writing on degraded ecosystems, they highlight what Karen Laura Thornber calls ecoambiguity—the complex, contradictory interactions between people and the nonhuman environment. Ecoambiguity is the first book in any language to analyze Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Taiwanese literary treatments of damaged ecosystems. Thornber closely examines East Asian creative portrayals of inconsistent human attitudes, behaviors, and information concerning the environment and takes up texts by East Asians who have been translated and celebrated around the world, including Gao Xingjian, Ishimure Michiko, Jiang Rong, and Ko Un, as well as fiction and poetry by authors little known even in their homelands. Ecoambiguity addresses such environmental crises as deforesting, damming, pollution, overpopulation, species eradication, climate change, and nuclear apocalypse. This book opens new portals of inquiry in both East Asian literatures and ecocriticism (literature and environment studies), as well as in comparative and world literature.

Eco Translation

Author: Michael Cronin
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317423887
Size: 11,33 MB
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Ecology has become a central question governing the survival and sustainability of human societies, cultures and languages. In this timely study, Michael Cronin investigates how the perspective of the Anthropocene, or the effect of humans on the global environment, has profound implications for the way translation is considered in the past, present and future. Starting with a deep history of translation and ranging from food ecology to inter-species translation and green translation technology, this thought-provoking book offers a challenging and ultimately hopeful perspective on how translation can play a vital role in the future survival of the planet.

Outlet

Author: Randy Taguchi
Editor: Vertical Incorporated
ISBN:
Size: 15,49 MB
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Yuki Asakura, a financial columnist, tries to uncover the facts surrounding the mysterious death of her brother, who was found dead in his apartment, apparently from starvation.