Hegemonic Peace And Empire

Author: Ali Parchami
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1134007035
Size: 13,35 MB
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This book examines the language and the ideology of the Pax Romana, the Pax Britannica and the Pax Americana within the broader contexts of 'hegemony' and 'empire'. It addresses three main themes: a conceptual examination of the way in which hegemony has been justified; a linguistic study of how the notion of pax (usually translated as peace) has been used in ancient and modern times; and a study of the international orders created by Rome and Britain. Using an historiographical approach, the book draws upon texts from Greco-Roman antiquity, and sources from the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries to show how the pax ideology has served as a justification for hegemonic foreign policy, and as an intellectual exercise in power projection. From Tacitus' condemnation of what he described as 'creating a wilderness and calling it peace', to debates about the establishment of a Pax Americana in post-Saddam Hussein's Iraq, the book shows not only how the governing elite in each of the three hegemonic orders prescribed to a loose interpretation of the pax ideology, but also how their internal disagreements and different conceptualisations of pax have affected the process of 'empire-building'. This book will be of interest to students of international history, empire, and International Relations in general.

War And Change In World Politics

Author: Robert Gilpin
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521273763
Size: 12,77 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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War and Change in World Politics introduces the reader to an important new theory of international political change. Arguing that the fundamental nature of international relations has not changed over the millennia, Professor Gilpin uses history, sociology, and economic theory to identify the forces causing change in the world order. The discussion focuses on the differential growth of power in the international system and the result of this unevenness. A shift in the balance of power - economic or military - weakens the foundations of the existing system, because those gaining power see the increasing benefits and the decreasing cost of changing the system. The result, maintains Gilpin, is that actors seek to alter the system through territorial, political, or economic expansion until the marginal costs of continuing change are greater than the marginal benefits. When states develop the power to change the system according to their interests they will strive to do so- either by increasing economic efficiency and maximizing mutual gain, or by redistributing wealth and power in their own favour.

Safe Passage

Author: Kori Schake
Editor: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674975073
Size: 11,50 MB
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History records only one peaceful transition of hegemonic power: the passage from British to American dominance of the international order. To explain why this transition was nonviolent, Kori Schake explores nine points of crisis between Britain and the U.S., from the Monroe Doctrine to the unequal “special relationship” during World War II.

Hegemonic Masculinities And Camouflaged Politics

Author: James W. Messerschmidt
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317258215
Size: 18,34 MB
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Analyzing the speeches of the two Bush presidencies, this book presents a new conceptualization of hegemonic masculinity by making the case for a multiplicity of hegemonic masculinites locally, regionally, and globally. This book outlines how state leaders may appeal to particular hegemonic masculinites in their attempt to "sell" wars and thereby camouflage salient political practices in the process. Messerschmidt offers a fresh historical perspective on the war against Iraq over an 18-year period, and he argues that we cannot truly understand this war outside of its gendered (masculine) and historical context.

After Hegemony

Author: Robert O. Keohane
Editor: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400820269
Size: 19,63 MB
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This book is a comprehensive study of cooperation among the advanced capitalist countries. Can cooperation persist without the dominance of a single power, such as the United States after World War II? To answer this pressing question, Robert Keohane analyzes the institutions, or "international regimes," through which cooperation has taken place in the world political economy and describes the evolution of these regimes as American hegemony has eroded. Refuting the idea that the decline of hegemony makes cooperation impossible, he views international regimes not as weak substitutes for world government but as devices for facilitating decentralized cooperation among egoistic actors. In the preface the author addresses the issue of cooperation after the end of the Soviet empire and with the renewed dominance of the United States, in security matters, as well as recent scholarship on cooperation.

Hegemony Or Survival

Author: Noam Chomsky
Editor: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 9781429900218
Size: 11,77 MB
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From the world's foremost intellectual activist, an irrefutable analysis of America's pursuit of total domination and the catastrophic consequences that are sure to follow The United States is in the process of staking out not just the globe but the last unarmed spot in our neighborhood-the heavens-as a militarized sphere of influence. Our earth and its skies are, for the Bush administration, the final frontiers of imperial control. In Hegemony or Survival , Noam Chomsky investigates how we came to this moment, what kind of peril we find ourselves in, and why our rulers are willing to jeopardize the future of our species. With the striking logic that is his trademark, Chomsky dissects America's quest for global supremacy, tracking the U.S. government's aggressive pursuit of policies intended to achieve "full spectrum dominance" at any cost. He lays out vividly how the various strands of policy-the militarization of space, the ballistic-missile defense program, unilateralism, the dismantling of international agreements, and the response to the Iraqi crisis-cohere in a drive for hegemony that ultimately threatens our survival. In our era, he argues, empire is a recipe for an earthly wasteland. Lucid, rigorous, and thoroughly documented, Hegemony or Survival promises to be Chomsky's most urgent and sweeping work in years, certain to spark widespread debate.

Geopolitical Economy

Author: Radhika Desai
Editor: Pluto Press
ISBN: 9780745329925
Size: 17,35 MB
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Geopolitical Economy radically reinterprets the historical evolution of the world order, as a multi-polar world emerges from the dust of the financial and economic crisis. Radhika Desai offers a radical critique of the theories of US hegemony, globalisation and empire which dominate academic international political economy and international relations, revealing their ideological origins in successive failed US attempts at world dominance through the dollar. Desai revitalizes revolutionary intellectual traditions which combine class and national perspectives on 'the relations of producing nations'. At a time of global upheavals and profound shifts in the distribution of world power, Geopolitical Economy forges a vivid and compelling account of the historical processes which are shaping the contemporary international order.

China S Hegemony

Author: Ji-Young Lee
Editor: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231542178
Size: 14,69 MB
Format: PDF
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Watching China’s growing power and international prominence today, many have invoked China’s imperial past to project Asia’s future dominated by China. China’s Hegemony shows that the Chinese-centered international order in Asia’s past was not as Sinocentric as conventional wisdom suggests. Instead, throughout the early modern period, Chinese hegemony was accepted, defied, and challenged by its East Asian neighbors at different times, depending on these leaders’ strategies for legitimacy among their own populations. This book demonstrates that Chinese hegemony and hierarchy were not an outcome of just China’s military power or Confucian culture but were constructed while interacting with other, less powerful actors’ domestic political needs. Focusing on China-Korea-Japan dynamics of East Asian international politics during the Ming and High Qing periods, Lee draws on extensive research of East Asian language documents, including records written by Chinese and Korean envoys. The book offers fascinating and rich details of war and peace in Asian international relations, addressing questions such as: why Japan invaded Korea and fought a war against Sino-Korean coalition in the late sixteenth century; why Korea attempted to strike at the Ming empire militarily in the late fourteenth century; and how Japan created a miniature international order posing as the center of Asia in lieu of the Qing empire in the seventeenth century. By answering these questions, Lee’s in-depth study speaks directly to general international relations literature and concludes that hegemony in Asia is a domestic as well as international phenomenon with implications for the contemporary era.

Empires

Author: Herfried Münkler
Editor: Polity
ISBN: 0745638716
Size: 14,65 MB
Format: PDF
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Do the politicians in Washington dictate the rules that the rest of the world must follow? Or do empires have a logic of their own? This book analyses the characteristics of empires and traces the rise and fall of imperial powers. It also shows how empires provide stability, and examines the dangers they face when their powers are overstretched.

Regional Intervention Politics In Africa

Author: Stefanie Wodrig
Editor: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1315436728
Size: 13,29 MB
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This book analyses regional interventions in African conflict spaces by engaging with political discourse theory. Interventions are a performance of agency, but what happens if interventions are performed by forces that scholars have hardly ever considered as relevant agents in this regard? Based on a study of regional politics towards the crises in Burundi and Zimbabwe, the book analyses how these interventions shaped and changed the emerging regional interveners. The book engages political discourse theory, proposing an understanding of intervention as a field, in which multiple and heterogeneous interpretations of the violence, the crisis, and the future post-conflict order ‘meet'. It is not hard to imagine that this encounter is not harmonious per se but full of frictions. By making use of political discourse theory as a grammar for studying the complexity of an intervention, the focus is directed to the emerging subjectivities of regional interveners. This enables a view of regional interventions that neither reduces their subjectivity to universalist categories associated with 'liberal peace' nor overenthusiastically embraces them as the solution to all problems. This book will be of interest to students of international intervention, discourse theory, African politics, war and conflict studies, security studies and IR.