Homer S Daughter

Author: Robert Graves
Editor: Penguin UK
ISBN: 014197091X
Size: 11,34 MB
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In Homer's Daughter Robert Graves recreates the Odyssey. This bold retelling of the ancient epic imagines that its author was not the blind and bearded Homer of legend, but a young woman in Western Sicily who calls herself Nausicaä. In Robert Graves's words, Homer's Daughter is 'the story of a high-spirited and religious-minded Sicilian girl who saves her father's throne from usurpation, herself from a distasteful marriage, and her two younger brothers from butchery by boldly making things happen, instead of sitting still and hoping for the best.'

Memoir And Letters Of Sara Coleridge Ed By Her Daughter E Coleridge

Author: Sara Coleridge
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 13,52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Works Of William Cowper Translation Of Homer S Odyssey

Author: William Cowper
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 19,71 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Homer S Odyssey

Author: Homer
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 15,94 MB
Format: PDF
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Homer S Iliad Translated By W Munford

Author: Homer
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 20,28 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Homer And The Poetics Of Hades

Author: George Alexander Gazis
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0191091146
Size: 14,33 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Homer and the Poetics of Hades offers a new and unique approach to the Iliad and, more particularly, the Odyssey through an exploration of the role and function of the Underworld as a poetic resource permitting an alternative perspective on the epic past. By portraying Hades as a realm where vision is not possible, Homer creates a unique poetic environment in which social constraints and divine prohibitions do not apply, resulting in a narrative which emulates that of the Muses but which at the same time is markedly distinct from it. In Hades experimentation with, and alteration of, important epic forms and values can be pursued with greater freedom, giving rise to a different kind of poetics: the 'poetics of Hades'. In the Iliad, Homer offers us a glimpse of how this alternative poetics works through the visit of Patroclus' shade in Achilles' dream. The recollection offered by the shade reveals an approach to its past in which regret, self-pity, and a lingering memory of intimate and emotional moments displace an objective tone and traditional exposition of heroic values. However, the potential of Hades for providing alternative means of commemorating the past is more fully explored in the 'Nekyia' of Odyssey 11: there, Odysseus' extraordinary ability to see the dead in Hades allows him to meet and interview the shades of heroines and heroes of the epic past, while the absolute confinement of Hades allows the shades to recount their stories from their own personal points of view. The poetic implications are significant, since by visiting Hades and listening to the stories of the shades Odysseus, and Homer with him, gain access to a tradition in which epic values associated with gender roles and even divine law are suspended in favour of a more immediate and personally inflected approach to the epic past. As readers, this alternative poetics offers us more than just a revised framework within which to navigate the Iliad and the Odyssey, inviting as it does a more nuanced understanding of the Greeks' anxieties around mortality and posthumous fame.

Homer And His Age

Author: Andrew Lang
Editor: Library of Alexandria
ISBN: 1465600884
Size: 18,87 MB
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In Homer and the Epic, ten or twelve years ago, I examined the literary objections to Homeric unity. These objections are chiefly based on alleged discrepancies in the narrative, of which no one poet, it is supposed, could have been guilty. The critics repose, I venture to think, mainly on a fallacy. We may style it the fallacy of "the analytical reader." The poet is expected to satisfy a minutely critical reader, a personage whom he could not foresee, and whom he did not address. Nor are "contradictory instances" examinedÑthat is, as Blass has recently reminded his countrymen, Homer is put to a test which Goethe could not endure. No long fictitious narrative can satisfy "the analytical reader." The fallacy is that of disregarding the Homeric poet's audience. He did not sing for Aristotle or for Aristarchus, or for modern minute and reflective inquirers, but for warriors and ladies. He certainly satisfied them; but if he does not satisfy microscopic professors, he is described as a syndicate of many minstrels, living in many ages. In the present volume little is said in defence of the poet's consistency. Several chapters on that point have been excised. The way of living which Homer describes is examined, and an effort is made to prove that he depicts the life of a single brief age of culture. The investigation is compelled to a tedious minuteness, because the points of attackÑthe alleged discrepancies in descriptions of the various details of existenceÑare so minute as to be all but invisible. The unity of the Epics is not so important a topic as the methods of criticism. They ought to be sober, logical, and self-consistent. When these qualities are absent, Homeric criticism may be described, in the recent words of Blass, as "a swamp haunted by wandering fires, will o' the wisps."

Studies On Homer And The Homeric Age

Author: William Ewart Gladstone
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 10,20 MB
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Pope Homer And Manliness

Author: Carolyn D. Williams
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317694740
Size: 14,12 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The author here reassesses the concept of ‘masculinity’, and argues that it cannot be seen as an absolute standard, but only as the product of perpetual conflict between competing and unstable models. The argument is sustained by a close reading of the problematic conflict between gendered values in eighteenth-century classical learning. Pope’s Homer ensured the continuation of the tradition of using the Iliad and Odyssey to teach privileged boys how to become more ‘manly’. This book examines this pedagogy in its socio-literary context, and concludes that Pope’s Homer emerges as a relic of the struggle to preserve masculine dignity from the encroachments of feminine values in the text. This knowledge of classical and early modern literature has rarely been brought to bear on gender studies. First published in 1993, it remains a valuable contribution to debates concerning the reception of the Classical tradition.