Information And Coding Theory

Author: Gareth A. Jones
Editor: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1447103610
Size: 13,63 MB
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This text is an elementary introduction to information and coding theory. The first part focuses on information theory, covering uniquely decodable and instantaneous codes, Huffman coding, entropy, information channels, and Shannon’s Fundamental Theorem. In the second part, linear algebra is used to construct examples of such codes, such as the Hamming, Hadamard, Golay and Reed-Muller codes. Contains proofs, worked examples, and exercises.

Finite Geometry And Combinatorial Applications

Author: Simeon Ball
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107107997
Size: 15,19 MB
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A graduate-level introduction to finite geometry and its applications to other areas of combinatorics.

Angewandte Abstrakte Algebra

Author: Rudolf Lidl
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 14,32 MB
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Codes An Introduction To Information Communication And Cryptography

Author: Norman L. Biggs
Editor: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781848002739
Size: 17,32 MB
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Many people do not realise that mathematics provides the foundation for the devices we use to handle information in the modern world. Most of those who do know probably think that the parts of mathematics involvedare quite ‘cl- sical’, such as Fourier analysis and di?erential equations. In fact, a great deal of the mathematical background is part of what used to be called ‘pure’ ma- ematics, indicating that it was created in order to deal with problems that originated within mathematics itself. It has taken many years for mathema- cians to come to terms with this situation, and some of them are still not entirely happy about it. Thisbookisanintegratedintroductionto Coding.Bythis Imeanreplacing symbolic information, such as a sequence of bits or a message written in a naturallanguage,byanother messageusing (possibly) di?erentsymbols.There are three main reasons for doing this: Economy (data compression), Reliability (correction of errors), and Security (cryptography). I have tried to cover each of these three areas in su?cient depth so that the reader can grasp the basic problems and go on to more advanced study. The mathematical theory is introduced in a way that enables the basic problems to bestatedcarefully,butwithoutunnecessaryabstraction.Theprerequisites(sets andfunctions,matrices,?niteprobability)shouldbefamiliartoanyonewhohas taken a standard course in mathematical methods or discrete mathematics. A course in elementary abstract algebra and/or number theory would be helpful, but the book contains the essential facts, and readers without this background should be able to understand what is going on. vi Thereareafewplaceswherereferenceismadetocomputeralgebrasystems.

Special Relativity

Author: Nicholas M.J. Woodhouse
Editor: Springer-Verlag
ISBN: 3540466762
Size: 19,47 MB
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Cryptography Theory And Practice

Author: Douglas Robert Stinson
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 3319948180
Size: 17,61 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Newsletter

Author: New Zealand Mathematical Society
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 20,78 MB
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Mathematical Reviews

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Size: 15,57 MB
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Bpr

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ISBN:
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A First Course In Discrete Mathematics

Author: Brian Lian
Editor: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781852332365
Size: 20,42 MB
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Drawing on many years'experience of teaching discrete mathem atics to students of all levels, Anderson introduces such as pects as enumeration, graph theory and configurations or arr angements. Starting with an introduction to counting and rel ated problems, he moves on to the basic ideas of graph theor y with particular emphasis on trees and planar graphs. He de scribes the inclusion-exclusion principle followed by partit ions of sets which in turn leads to a study of Stirling and Bell numbers. Then follows a treatment of Hamiltonian cycles, Eulerian circuits in graphs, and Latin squares as well as proof of Hall's theorem. He concludes with the constructions of schedules and a brief introduction to block designs. Each chapter is backed by a number of examples, with straightforw ard applications of ideas and more challenging problems.