The Lost Legion

Author: H. Warner Munn
Editor: Doubleday Books
ISBN: 9780385148283
Size: 19,88 MB
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A vast tapestry of ancient times unfolds in this stirring tale of adventure and romance, whose setting reaches fom the hills of rome to the limits of the known world in the age of the Emperor Caligula.

The Lost Legion

Author: William Andrew Robertson Chapin
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 18,69 MB
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The Lost Legion

Author: Tracey West
Editor: Turtleback
ISBN: 9780606151894
Size: 13,67 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Do you have what it takes to be a clone trooper in the Republic Army? In this "Decide Your Destiny "story you can choose from multiple characters, such as medic, commander or demolitions expert, and dozens of paths to create your own adventure. With over twenty-five different endings, every time you read the book itall be a whole new adventure.

Lost Legion Rediscovered

Author: Donald O'Reilly
Editor: Pen & Sword Books
ISBN: 9781848843783
Size: 17,82 MB
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In AD383, according to Bishop Eucherius of Lyon, flooding caused part of the bank of the River Rhone to collapse, revealing a massed grave of thousands of bodies. Eucherius identified these as a legion recruited for the Roman army from the Christians of the Theban district in Egypt, whom he claimed had been massacred nearly a century previously (near the modern village of St Maurice-en-Valais in southwestern Switzerland) for refusing to obey orders they considered immoral. This incident, asserted by Eucherius as matter of fact, is unrecorded elsewhere. Even the existence of this Theban legion is unclear. Intrigued by this discrepancy, and suspecting a cover-up by official Roman sources, Dr Donald Reilly has spent many years undertaking some historical detective work. Piecing together scattered clues from ancient coins, inscriptions and obscure texts he identifies the Theban legion as fact and sheds light on their fate. In the process he paints a powerful portrait of an empire in turmoil, beset by external enemies and riven by religious and moral uncertainties within.

Camp Fire Yarns Of The Lost Legion

Author: G. Hamilton-Browne
Editor: T. WERNER LAURIE LTD.
ISBN:
Size: 16,46 MB
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Camp Fire Yarns of the Lost Legion To begin with, let me speak of their courage, which was displayed in such a marked degree during the long wars that lasted from 1860 to 1871, for the whole of which period the Maoris were hopelessly outnumbered and, as far as armament went, were equally outclassed. Yet these brave fellows fought on and on, and even when the end came, and the shattered remnants of the so-called rebels took refuge in the King Country, the New Zealand Government, fearing to risk further war with the powerful Waikato tribes, resorted to what was called the blanket-and-sugar policy, rather than follow Te Kooti or demand his extradition from King Tawhiao, who at that time was just as independent of English rule as France was. The first fighting took place in 1860, and soon General Sir Duncan Cameron had over 1000 Imperial troops under his command, as well as an equal number of Colonial Militia and Irregulars, and also a powerful Naval Brigade. He had also a strong force of Artillery, and was well supplied with ammunition and stores of all kinds. Yet perhaps you will scarcely credit me when I tell you that never at any single moment had he more than 2000 natives in arms against him, and that he was never opposed in any single action by even 1000 men. It must be borne in mind that Sir Duncan’s force was one of the most powerful that England, up to that time, without the assistance of allies,[Pg 3] had ever put into the field; that the men who composed it were all of them good, seasoned men, many of them being veterans of the Crimea and Mutiny; that the Militia were highly trained, most of them old soldiers, under the command of ex-Imperial officers; that the Irregulars proved themselves to be second to none in the field, and that the natives only possessed old muskets and fowling-pieces. Now these numbers are staggering, but absolutely correct, as it is also that the above force made but small headway against this handful of savages; for although Sir Duncan forced his way into the Waikato and held a chain of forts there, yet on the west coast, especially in the districts of Taranaki and Wanganui, the settlers had to abandon their homesteads, the women and children being sent for safety to the South Island, and no man’s life was safe beyond rifle range of the forts. This was the state of New Zealand in 1866, after six years of incessant war, and it can only be accounted for in the following way:— To commence, the General and his officers were hidebound with the old traditions and maxims of the British army. They simply would not or could not adapt themselves to the exigencies or tactics of irregular warfare, nor could they be made to understand or believe that a regiment that could march in line like a brick wall might easily be worsted by a mob of savages in a New Zealand bush. Then again when attacking pahs: the General considered that the correct way to do so was, after a sharp bombardment, to rush the place with the bayonet. Who could imagine for a moment that natives[Pg 4] could hold their flimsy stockades against men who had stormed the Redan and taken Delhi at the point of the bayonet. Yet they did. Rangiriri was assaulted three times, and on each occasion, notwithstanding the splendid devotion and courage of our gallant Tommies, they were driven back with great loss. Yet on the following day the 180 defenders marched out and laid down their arms. Why? For three days they had been without one drop of water. The General knew they had no water, then why did he risk the lives of his splendid men by ordering futile assaults? Rangiriri took place in November 1863, and one would have thought that the General might have learned something, by its lesson, of the ways how best to deal with a Maori pah; but he had neglected to do so, for in April, the following year, he invested Orakau Pah, the defenders of which exhibited gallantry seldom equalled and never surpassed in all the annals of human warfare. Let me try and give you a brief account, as I heard it some years afterwards from the mouth of one of its defenders:

The Eagle Film Tie In

Author: Rosemary Sutcliff
Editor: Oxford University Press - Children
ISBN: 0192732684
Size: 13,94 MB
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Rosemary Sutcliff's best-selling The Eagle of the Ninth - now a major motion picture filmed as The Eagle.

Rudyard Kipling The Lost Legion

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
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As part of the Literature Network, Chris Beasley presents the full text of the English poem entitled "The Lost Legion." This poem was written by the Indian-born English author Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936).

The Lost Legion

Author: Cedric Daurio
Editor: Oscar Luis Rigiroli via PublishDrive
ISBN:
Size: 20,85 MB
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In the year 53 b.C. a Roman army is defeated in Asia Minor. A legion survives and settles in China. At the present time an Italian historian travels to unveil the mystery of the fate of those 10,000 men near the Gobi Desert. In that endeavor he finds the love of a Chinese Anthropologist but also the danger of dark interests that do not want their presence in the region. The quest becomes a personal challenge. A brilliant exponent of the historical fiction genre. The Lost Legion is a thriller that will keep your breath until the end.

The Eagle Of The Ninth

Author: Rosemary Sutcliff
Editor: Oxford University Press - Children
ISBN: 0192732676
Size: 13,91 MB
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Four thousand men disappeared and their eagle standard was lost. It's a mystery that's never been solved, until now . . .Marcus has to find out what happened to his father, who led the legion. So he sets out into the unknown, on a quest so dangerous that nobody expects him to return.The Eagle of the Ninth is heralded as one of the most outstanding children's books of the twentieth century and has sold over a million copies worldwide. Rosemary Sutcliff's books about Roman Britain have won much acclaim. The author writes with such passion and with such attention to detail that the Roman age is instantly brought to life and stays with the reader long after the last page has been turned.

Legion Of The Lost

Author: Jaime Salazar
Editor: Thistle Publishing
ISBN: 9781910670798
Size: 17,28 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Revised edition, with a new foreword and afterword from the author. 'From an air-conditioned Chicago office, Mr. Salazar took the express elevator straight to hell. Legion of the Lost is his story, the improbable, very funny tale of a sensitive, bookish child of Mexican immigrants who walked away from a promising career and, for romantic reasons, threw in his lot with a motley assortment of thugs, drunks, drug abusers and desperate refugees from the far corners of the earth. And those are the ones giving orders.' New York Times 'A story of horrifying institutionalised cruelty and incredible suffering, tempered with extraordinary camaraderie and mind-boggling fortitude. Legion of the Lost lays to rest romantic myths about the French Foreign Legion forever.' Google Books 'After about a year in corporate America, Jaime Salazar realized he wanted more in life. He wanted more than a big paycheck and a BMW. Salazar is a born adventurer and romantic and was not content with his job with Siemens in Chicago, where he was part of the technical sales teams. His ideals led him to the French Foreign Legion.' The Purdue Exponent 'A colorful, detailed, and brisk account of the blood, beatings, binge drinking, racism, and occasional satisfaction and pride from his time with the Legion. Salazar's prose marches along like a fit Legionnaire, largely un-ornamented yet getting the job done quickly and effectively, with all the dirt, swearing, and gunpowder one would expect from a military memoir. Legion of the Lost should prompt serious reflection about commitment, discipline, meaning, and purpose in life.' Good Reads No army is more surrounded by mystery, romance, and admiration than the French Foreign Legion. King Louis Philippe II created the Foreign Legion in 1831 as a way to rid France of penniless immigrants and others considered a liability to the French establishment. The Foreign Legion still exists today as an elite army of modern mercenaries from around the world, in the service of la France. Considered a haven for the dregs of society, joining the Foreign Legion was rumoured to be simple, but it wasn't. Getting out of the Foreign Legion, as Salazar soon realised, proved impossible. So what was an engineering professional doing in the "Legion of the Damned"? For those Dostoevsky calls the "insulted and the injured," men of character who seek adventure in the most obscure places, the Legion offers refuge. After surrendering his passport, and with it, any human rights, the Legion gave Salazar a new name and life. Even after finishing four months of what the Legion calls instruction, Salazar realized that his existence wasn't like that of Gary Cooper in Beau Geste. It was more a primitive life of beatings, marches, fanatical discipline, and sadistic NCOs. Idealists looking for a new beginning come to the Legion, but only the toughest, and cruelest are left to wear the Legion headdress, the kepi blanc. Once enlisted, there are three ways to leave the Legion: finishing one's five-year contract, disability, or leaving in a box. While serving a term in Legion prison, Salazar came up with a fourth solution - escape."