Ma Ana Es San Per N

Author: Mariano Ben Plotkin
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780842050296
Size: 15,54 MB
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The regime of Juan Per-n is one of the most studied topics of Argentina's contemporary history. This new book-an English translation of a highly popular, critically acclaimed Spanish language edition-provides a new perspective on the intriguing Argentinian leader. Mariano Plotkin's cultural approach makes Per-n's popularity understandable because it goes beyond Per-n's charismatic appeal and analyzes the Peronist mechanisms used to generate political consent and mass mobilization. Ma-ana es San Per-n is the first book to focus on the cultural and symbolic dimensions of Peronism and populism. It explores the creation of myths, symbols, and rituals which constituted the Peronist political imagery. This well-written and engaging account of one of Latin America's most colorful and appealing leaders is an excellent resource on Argentina and Latin American history and politics.

Phallacies

Author: Kathleen M. Brian
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190459018
Size: 19,75 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Phallacies: Historical Intersections of Disability and Masculinity is a collection of essays that focuses on disabled men who negotiate their masculinity as well as their disability. The chapters cover a broad range of topics: institutional structures that define what it means to be a man with a disability; the place of women in situations where masculinity and disability are constructed; men with physical and war-related disabilities; male hysteria, suicide clubs, and mercy killing; male disability in literature and popular culture; and more. All the authors regard masculinity and disability in the historical contexts of the Americas and Western Europe, with particular attention to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Taken together, the essays in this volume offer a nuanced portrait of the complex, and at times competing, interactions between masculinity and disability.

Lines In The Sand

Author: William E. Skuban
Editor: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826342232
Size: 13,90 MB
Format: PDF
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Following the War of the Pacific (1879-1883), Chile and Peru signed the Treaty of Ancón (1884) that, in part, dealt with settling a territorial dispute over the provinces of Tacna and Arica along the countries' new common border. The treaty allowed Chile to administer the two provinces for a period of ten years, after which a plebiscite would allow the region's inhabitants to determine their own nationality. At the end of the prearranged decade, however, the Chilean and the Peruvian governments had failed to conduct the vote that would determine the fate of the people. Over a quarter of a century later, and after attempts by the U.S. government to mediate the dispute, the two countries in 1929 decided simply to divide the area, with Arica becoming a part of Chile and Peru reincorporating Tacna. Against the backdrop of this contested frontier, William Skuban explores the processes of nationalism and national identity formation in the half century that followed the War of the Pacific. He first considers the national projects of Peru and Chile in the disputed territories and then moves on to how these efforts were received among the diverse social strata of the region. Skuban's study highlights the fabricated nature of national identity in what became one of the most contentious frontier situations in South American history.

The New Cultural History Of Peronism

Author: Matthew B. Karush
Editor: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822392860
Size: 16,43 MB
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In nearly every account of modern Argentine history, the first Peronist regime (1946–55) emerges as the critical juncture. Appealing to growing masses of industrial workers, Juan Perón built a powerful populist movement that transformed economic and political structures, promulgated new conceptions and representations of the nation, and deeply polarized the Argentine populace. Yet until now, most scholarship on Peronism has been constrained by a narrow, top-down perspective. Inspired by the pioneering work of the historian Daniel James and new approaches to Latin American cultural history, scholars have recently begun to rewrite the history of mid-twentieth-century Argentina. The New Cultural History of Peronism brings together the best of this important new scholarship. Situating Peronism within the broad arc of twentieth-century Argentine cultural change, the contributors focus on the interplay of cultural traditions, official policies, commercial imperatives, and popular perceptions. They describe how the Perón regime’s rhetoric and representations helped to produce new ideas of national and collective identity. At the same time, they show how Argentines pursued their interests through their engagement with the Peronist project, and, in so doing, pushed the regime in new directions. While the volume’s emphasis is on the first Perón presidency, one contributor explores the origins of the regime and two others consider Peronism’s transformations in subsequent years. The essays address topics including mass culture and melodrama, folk music, pageants, social respectability, architecture, and the intense emotional investment inspired by Peronism. They examine the experiences of women, indigenous groups, middle-class anti-Peronists, internal migrants, academics, and workers. By illuminating the connections between the state and popular consciousness, The New Cultural History of Peronism exposes the contradictions and ambivalences that have characterized Argentine populism. Contributors: Anahi Ballent, Oscar Chamosa, María Damilakou, Eduardo Elena, Matthew B. Karush, Diana Lenton, Mirta Zaida Lobato, Natalia Milanesio, Mariano Ben Plotkin, César Seveso, Lizel Tornay

A Nation For All

Author: Alejandro de la Fuente
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807898765
Size: 13,59 MB
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After thirty years of anticolonial struggle against Spain and four years of military occupation by the United States, Cuba formally became an independent republic in 1902. The nationalist coalition that fought for Cuba's freedom, a movement in which blacks and mulattoes were well represented, had envisioned an egalitarian and inclusive country--a nation for all, as Jose Marti described it. But did the Cuban republic, and later the Cuban revolution, live up to these expectations? Tracing the formation and reformulation of nationalist ideologies, government policies, and different forms of social and political mobilization in republican and postrevolutionary Cuba, Alejandro de la Fuente explores the opportunities and limitations that Afro-Cubans experienced in such areas as job access, education, and political representation. Challenging assumptions of both underlying racism and racial democracy, he contends that racism and antiracism coexisted within Cuban nationalism and, in turn, Cuban society. This coexistence has persisted to this day, despite significant efforts by the revolutionary government to improve the lot of the poor and build a nation that was truly for all.

British Bulletin Of Publications On Latin America The Caribbean Portugal And Spain

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 12,27 MB
Format: PDF
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Freud In The Pampas

Author: Mariano Ben Plotkin
Editor: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804740609
Size: 14,23 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This is a fascinating history of how psychoanalysis became an essential element of contemporary Argentine culture--in the media, in politics, and in daily private lives. The book reveals the unique conditions and complex historical process that made possible the diffusion, acceptance, and popularization of psychoanalysis in Argentina, which has the highest number of psychoanalysts per capita in the world. It shows why the intellectual trajectory of the psychoanalytic movement was different in Argentina than in either the United States or Europe and how Argentine culture both fostered and was shaped by its influence. The book starts with a description of the Argentine medical and intellectual establishments’ reception of psychoanalysis, and the subsequent founding of the Argentine Psychoanalytic Association in 1942. It then broadens to describe the emergence of a "psy culture” in the 1960s, tracing its origins to a complex combination of social, economic, political, and cultural factors. The author then analyzes the role of "diffusers” of psychoanalysis in Argentina--both those who were part of the psychoanalytic establishment and those who were not. The book goes on to discuss specific areas of reception and diffusion of psychoanalytic thought: its acceptance by progressive sectors of the psychiatric profession; the impact of the psychoanalytically oriented program in psychology at the University of Buenos Aires; and the incorporation of psychoanalysis into the theoretical artillery of the influential left of the 1960s and 1970s. Finally, the author analyzes the effects of the military dictatorship, established in 1976, on the "psy” universe, showing how it was possible to practice psychoanalysis in a highly authoritarian political context.

Latin American Women And The Search For Social Justice

Author: Francesca Miller
Editor: UPNE
ISBN: 9780874515589
Size: 10,75 MB
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A clear and detailed study of Latin American women’s history from the late nineteenth century to the present.

Mexicans In Revolution 1910 1946

Author: William H. Beezley
Editor: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803224478
Size: 13,68 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Recounts the events surrounding the Mexican Revolution, covering key moments, conflicts, and developments from 1910 to 1920 and explaining how Mexicans fought for social and economic justice while shaping modern Mexico.

History Of Humanity From The Third Millennium To The Seventh Century B C

Author: Sigfried J. de Laet
Editor: UNESCO
ISBN: 9789231028113
Size: 13,18 MB
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The second volume covers the first two and a half thousand years of recorded history, from the start of the Bronze Age 5,000 years ago to the beginnings of the Iron Age. Written by a team of over sixty specialists, this volume includes a comprehensive bibliography and a detailed index.