Reader In The History Of Books And Printing

Author: Paul A. Winckler
Editor: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313240386
Size: 15,73 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 618
Download

An introduction to the history of graphic communication through the ages which studies the role of books and printing in the recording, preserving, and dissemination of ideas and its impact on civilization. The readings and illustrations have been selected from the extensive literature on the book to include items of value and interest to the student, educator, librarian, historian, media specialist, bibliophile, bookman and bookwoman--all who are interested in the world of books and printing.

Reader In The History Of Books And Printing

Author: Paul A. Winckler
Editor: Englewood, Colo. : Information Handling Services
ISBN: 9780910972789
Size: 15,62 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 742
Download


The Book History Reader

Author: David Finkelstein
Editor: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415226585
Size: 13,73 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Read: 892
Download

The Book History Reader brings together a rich variety of writings examining different aspects of the history of books and print culture, much of which is otherwise inaccessible. It looks at the development of the book, the move from spoken word to written texts, the commodification of books and authors, the power and profile of readers, and the future of the book in the electronic age. The Reader is arranged in thematic sections and features a general introduction as well as an introduction to each section. This pioneering book is a valuable resource for all those involved in book publishing studies and book history as well as students of English literature, cultural studies, sociology and history. Essays by: Thomas Adams and Nicholas Barker, Richard Altick, Roland Barthes, C.A. Bayly, Pierre Bourdieu, John Brewer, Michel de Certeau, Roger Chartier, Robert Darnton, Elizabeth Eisenstein, Lucien Febrve and Henri-Jean Martin, N.N. Feltes, Kate Flint, Stanley Fish, Michel Foucault, Wolfgang Iser, Adrian Johns, Jerome McGann, Don McKenzie, Jennifer E. Monaghan, Jan Dirk Muller, Walter Ong, Robert Patten, Janice Radway, Jonathan Rose, Mark Rose, John Sutherland, Jane Tompkins, James L.W. West III

The Coming Of The Book

Author: Lucien Febvre
Editor: Verso
ISBN: 9781859841082
Size: 17,65 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 545
Download

Books, and the printed word more generally, are aspects of modern life that are all too often taken for granted. Yet the emergence of the book was a process of immense historical importance and heralded the dawning of the epoch of modernity. In this much praised history of that process, Lucien Febvre and Henri-Jean Martin mesh together economic and technological history, sociology and anthropology, as well as the study of modes of consciousness, to root the development of the printed word in the changing social relations and ideological struggles of Western Europe.

An Introduction To Book History

Author: David Finkelstein
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1134380070
Size: 13,21 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 758
Download

This is a comprehensive introduction to books and print culture which examines the move from the spoken word to written texts, the book as commodity, the power and profile of readers, and the future of the book in an electronic age.

Gandhi S Printing Press

Author: Isabel Hofmeyr
Editor: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674074742
Size: 12,29 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 975
Download

When Gandhi as a young lawyer in South Africa began fashioning the tenets of his political philosophy, he was absorbed by a seemingly unrelated enterprise: creating a newspaper, Indian Opinion. In Gandhi’s Printing Press Isabel Hofmeyr provides an account of how this footnote to a career shaped the man who would become the world-changing Mahatma.

The Nature Of The Book

Author: Adrian Johns
Editor: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226401235
Size: 20,53 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 806
Download

In The Nature of the Book, a tour de force of cultural history, Adrian Johns constructs an entirely original and vivid picture of print culture and its many arenas—commercial, intellectual, political, and individual. "A compelling exposition of how authors, printers, booksellers and readers competed for power over the printed page. . . . The richness of Mr. Johns's book lies in the splendid detail he has collected to describe the world of books in the first two centuries after the printing press arrived in England."—Alberto Manguel, Washington Times "[A] mammoth and stimulating account of the place of print in the history of knowledge. . . . Johns has written a tremendously learned primer."—D. Graham Burnett, New Republic "A detailed, engrossing, and genuinely eye-opening account of the formative stages of the print culture. . . . This is scholarship at its best."—Merle Rubin, Christian Science Monitor "The most lucid and persuasive account of the new kind of knowledge produced by print. . . . A work to rank alongside McLuhan."—John Sutherland, The Independent "Entertainingly written. . . . The most comprehensive account available . . . well documented and engaging."—Ian Maclean, Times Literary Supplement

Cultures Of Print

Author: David D. Hall
Editor: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9781558490499
Size: 11,91 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 221
Download

How did people in early America understand the authority of print and how was this authority sustained and contested? These questions are at the heart of this set of pathbreaking essays in the history of the book by one of America's leading practitioners in this interdisciplinary field. David D. Hall examines the interchange between popular and learned cultures and the practices of reading and writing. His writings deal with change and continuity, exploring the possibility of a reading revolution and arguing for the long duration of a Protestant vernacular tradition. A newly written essay on book culture in the early Chesapeake describes a system of scribal publication. The pieces reflect Hall's belief that the better we understand the production and consumption of books, the closer we come to a social history of culture.

Iowa History Reader

Author: Marvin Bergman
Editor: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1609380118
Size: 13,96 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 823
Download

In 1978 historian Joseph Wall wrote that Iowa was “still seeking to assert its own identity. . . . It has no real center where the elite of either power, wealth, or culture may congregate. Iowa, in short, is middle America.” In this collection of well-written and accessible essays, originally published in 1996, seventeen of the Hawkeye State’s most accomplished historians reflect upon the dramatic and not-so-dramatic shifts in the middle land’s history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Marvin Bergman has drawn upon his years of editing the Annals of Iowa to gather contributors who cross disciplines, model the craft of writing a historical essay, cover more than one significant topic, and above all interpret history rather than recite it. In his preface to this new printing, he calls attention to publications that begin to fill the gaps noted in the 1996 edition. Rather than survey the basic facts, the essayists engage readers in the actual making of Iowa’s history by trying to understand the meaning of its past. By providing comprehensive accounts of topics in Iowa history that embrace the broader historiographical issues in American history, such as the nature of Progressivism and Populism, the debate over whether women’s expanded roles in wartime carried over to postwar periods, and the place of quantification in history, the essayists contribute substantially to debates at the national level at the same time that they interpret Iowa’s distinctive culture.

Every Book Its Reader

Author: Nicholas A. Basbanes
Editor: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0060593245
Size: 17,34 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Read: 920
Download

Inspired by a landmark exhibition mounted by the British Museum in 1963 to celebrate five eventful centuries of the printed word, Nicholas A. Basbanes offers a lively consideration of writings that have "made things happen" in the world, works that have both nudged the course of history and fired the imagination of countless influential people. In his fifth work to examine a specific aspect of book culture, Basbanes also asks what we can know about such figures as John Milton, Edward Gibbon, John Locke, Isaac Newton, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Adams, Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, Henry James, Thomas Edison, Helen Keller––even the notorious Marquis de Sade and Adolf Hitler––by knowing what they have read. He shows how books that many of these people have consulted, in some cases annotated with their marginal notes, can offer tantalizing clues to the evolution of their character and the development of their thought.