The Chinese In America

Author: Iris Chang
Editor: Penguin
ISBN: 1101126876
Size: 19,36 MB
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In an epic story that spans 150 years and continues to the present day, Iris Chang tells of a people’s search for a better life—the determination of the Chinese to forge an identity and a destiny in a strange land and, often against great obstacles, to find success. She chronicles the many accomplishments in America of Chinese immigrants and their descendents: building the infrastructure of their adopted country, fighting racist and exclusionary laws, walking the racial tightrope between black and white, contributing to major scientific and technological advances, expanding the literary canon, and influencing the way we think about racial and ethnic groups. Interweaving political, social, economic, and cultural history, as well as the stories of individuals, Chang offers a bracing view not only of what it means to be Chinese American, but also of what it is to be American.

The Chinese In America

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 14,77 MB
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Driven Out

Author: Jean Pfaelzer
Editor: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520256941
Size: 14,17 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This sweeping and groundbreaking work presents the shocking and violent history of ethnic cleansing against Chinese Americans from the Gold Rush era to the turn of the century.

The Poker Bride

Author: Christopher Corbett
Editor: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
ISBN: 9780802197924
Size: 14,69 MB
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When Gold Rush fever gripped the globe in 1849, thousands of Chinese came through San Francisco to seek fortune. In The Poker Bride, Christopher Corbett uses a legend of one extraordinary woman as a lens into this experience. Before 1849, the Chinese in the United States were little more than curiosities. But as word spread of gold in California, San Francisco's labyrinthine Chinatown sprang up, a city-within-a-city full of exotic foods and strange smells where Chinese women were smuggled into the country. At this time Polly, a young Chinese concubine, was brought by her owner to a remote mining camp in the highlands of Idaho, where he lost her in a poker game. Polly and her new owner then settled at an isolated ranch on the banks of the Salmon River. As the Gold Rush receded, it took with it the Chinese miners, but left behind Polly, who would make headlines when — as an old woman — she emerged from the Idaho hills nearly half a century later to tell her astounding story. The Poker Bride reconstructs a tale of the real American West: a place where the first Chinese flooded the country and left their mark long after the craze for gold had vanished.

The Chinese Experience In America

Author: Shih-shan Henry Tsai
Editor:
ISBN: 9780253203878
Size: 13,79 MB
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How have the Chinese fared in America? What motivated them to come here in the nineteenth century? How were they received by native Americans? These are some of the questions that Henry Tsai deals with in this important new book. He treats the nineteenth-century immigration experience, the development of early Chinese communities, American exclusion and the difficulties of living in the shadow of exclusion, and the Chinese community in the post-World War II era and today. Also covered are Chinese women in conemporary American society, the problems with children and youth in a multiracial society, and international issues such as the relationships between the U.S., China, and Taiwan, and the implications of these issues for the Chinese in America. The work provides a solid statistical analysis in a way that will be accessible to students and scholars as well as general readers.

Chop Suey Usa

Author: Yong Chen
Editor: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231538162
Size: 19,86 MB
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American diners began to flock to Chinese restaurants more than a century ago, making Chinese food the first mass-consumed cuisine in the United States. By 1980, it had become the country's most popular ethnic cuisine. Chop Suey, USA offers the first comprehensive interpretation of the rise of Chinese food, revealing the forces that made it ubiquitous in the American gastronomic landscape and turned the country into an empire of consumption. Engineered by a politically disenfranchised, numerically small, and economically exploited group, Chinese food's tour de America is an epic story of global cultural encounter. It reflects not only changes in taste but also a growing appetite for a more leisurely lifestyle. Americans fell in love with Chinese food not because of its gastronomic excellence but because of its affordability and convenience, which is why they preferred the quick and simple dishes of China while shunning its haute cuisine. Epitomized by chop suey, American Chinese food was a forerunner of McDonald's, democratizing the once-exclusive dining-out experience for such groups as marginalized Anglos, African Americans, and Jews. The rise of Chinese food is also a classic American story of immigrant entrepreneurship and perseverance. Barred from many occupations, Chinese Americans successfully turned Chinese food from a despised cuisine into a dominant force in the restaurant market, creating a critical lifeline for their community. Chinese American restaurant workers developed the concept of the open kitchen and popularized the practice of home delivery. They streamlined certain Chinese dishes, such as chop suey and egg foo young, turning them into nationally recognized brand names.

The Lucky Ones

Author: Mae Ngai
Editor: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691155321
Size: 15,68 MB
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Traces three generations of a Chinese-American family from its patriarch's self-invention as an immigration broker in post-gold rush San Francisco to the family's intimate involvement in the 1904 World's Fair.

Chinese America

Author: Peter Kwong
Editor:
ISBN: 9781595581198
Size: 15,55 MB
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A portrait of Chinese-American life documents the stories of Chinese pioneers who entered the country from the west coast in the mid-nineteenth century, illuminates the roles of Chinese-American transnationals who have shaped American multiculturalism, and considers the roles of Chinese Americans in immigration, globalization, and foreign policy. Reprint.

Dreaming Of Gold Dreaming Of Home

Author: Madeline Y. Hsu
Editor: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804746878
Size: 14,59 MB
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This book is a highly original study of transnationalism among immigrants from the county of Taishan, from which, until 1965, a high percentage of the Chinese in the United States originated. The author vividly depicts the continuing ties between Taishanese remaining in China and their kinsmen seeking their fortune in "Gold Mountain."

At America S Gates

Author: Erika Lee
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807863138
Size: 10,28 MB
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With the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, Chinese laborers became the first group in American history to be excluded from the United States on the basis of their race and class. This landmark law changed the course of U.S. immigration history, but we know little about its consequences for the Chinese in America or for the United States as a nation of immigrants. At America's Gates is the first book devoted entirely to both Chinese immigrants and the American immigration officials who sought to keep them out. Erika Lee explores how Chinese exclusion laws not only transformed Chinese American lives, immigration patterns, identities, and families but also recast the United States into a "gatekeeping nation." Immigrant identification, border enforcement, surveillance, and deportation policies were extended far beyond any controls that had existed in the United States before. Drawing on a rich trove of historical sources--including recently released immigration records, oral histories, interviews, and letters--Lee brings alive the forgotten journeys, secrets, hardships, and triumphs of Chinese immigrants. Her timely book exposes the legacy of Chinese exclusion in current American immigration control and race relations.