The New Abolition

Author: Gary Dorrien
Editor: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300216335
Size: 14,43 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Read: 357
Download

The black social gospel emerged from the trauma of Reconstruction to ask what a “new abolition” would require in American society. It became an important tradition of religious thought and resistance, helping to create an alternative public sphere of excluded voices and providing the intellectual underpinnings of the civil rights movement. This tradition has been seriously overlooked, despite its immense legacy. In this groundbreaking work, Gary Dorrien describes the early history of the black social gospel from its nineteenth-century founding to its close association in the twentieth century with W. E. B. Du Bois. He offers a new perspective on modern Christianity and the civil rights era by delineating the tradition of social justice theology and activism that led to Martin Luther King Jr.

Breaking White Supremacy

Author: Gary Dorrien
Editor: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300231350
Size: 14,17 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Read: 586
Download

This magisterial follow-up to The New Abolition, a Grawemeyer Award winner, tells the crucial second chapter in the black social gospel’s history. The civil rights movement was one of the most searing developments in modern American history. It abounded with noble visions, resounded with magnificent rhetoric, and ended in nightmarish despair. It won a few legislative victories and had a profound impact on U.S. society, but failed to break white supremacy. The symbol of the movement, Martin Luther King Jr., soared so high that he tends to overwhelm anything associated with him. Yet the tradition that best describes him and other leaders of the civil rights movement has been strangely overlooked. In his latest book, Gary Dorrien continues to unearth the heyday and legacy of the black social gospel, a tradition with a shimmering history, a martyred central figure, and enduring relevance today. This part of the story centers around King and the mid-twentieth-century black church leaders who embraced the progressive, justice-oriented, internationalist social gospel from the beginning of their careers and fulfilled it, inspiring and leading America’s greatest liberation movement.

King And The Other America

Author: Sylvie Laurent
Editor: University of California Press
ISBN: 0520288564
Size: 19,30 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 411
Download

Shortly before his assassination, Martin Luther King Jr. called for a radical redistribution of economic and political power to transform the whole of society. In 1967, he envisioned and designed the Poor People’s Campaign, an interracial effort that was carried out after his death. This campaign brought together impoverished Americans of all races to demand better wages, better jobs, better homes, and better education. King and the Other America explores this overlooked and obscured episode of the late civil rights movement, deepening our understanding of King’s commitment to social justice and also of the long-term trajectory of the civil rights movement. Digging into earlier radical arguments about economic inequality across America, which King drew on throughout his entire political and religious life, Sylvie Laurent argues that the Poor People’s Campaign was the logical culmination of King’s influences and ideas, which have had lasting impact on young activists and the public. Fifty years later, growing inequality and grinding poverty in the United States have spurred new efforts to rejuvenate the campaign. This book draws the connections between King's perceptive thoughts on substantive justice and the ongoing quest for equality for all.

W E B Du Bois And The Sociology Of The Black Church And Religion 1897 1914

Author: Robert A. Wortham
Editor: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498530362
Size: 14,68 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Read: 433
Download

W. E. B. Du Bois is the founding figure of the sociological study of the Black Church. His discussion of the six functions of Philadelphia’s Black Church in The Philadelphia Negro (1899) represented an early example of a “functional analysis” of a religious group. In The Negro Church (1903), he integrated the findings from religious census data, denominational statistics, small area surveys, ethnographic fieldwork, and historical studies to paint a picture of the vibrant role the Black Church played in the African American community. Du Bois discusses the Black Church in three of the essays included in The Souls of Black Folk (1903), other sociological essays and several Atlanta University Conference annual reports. Additionally, Du Bois’ perspective on the Black Church and the role of religion in the African American community can be gleaned from various poetic works, prayers, and editorials. W.E.B. Du Bois and the Sociological Study of the Black Church and Religion, 1897–1914 showcases a representative sample of classic studies on the Black Church and religion by a pioneer of American sociology.

The Spiritual Lives Of Young African Americans

Author: Almeda Wright
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190664754
Size: 13,72 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 410
Download

How do young African Americans approach their faith in God when continued violence and police brutality batters the news each day? In The Spiritual Lives of Young African Americans, Almeda M. Wright argues that African American youth separate their everyday lives and their spirituality into mutually exclusive categories. This results in a noticeable division between their experiences of systemic injustices and their religious beliefs and practices. Yet Wright suggests that youth can and do teach the church and society myriad lessons through their theological reflections and actions. Giving special attention to the resources of African American religious and theological traditions, Wright creates a critical pedagogy for integrating spirituality into the lives of African American youth, as well as confronting and navigating spiritual fragmentation and systemic injustice.

Social Ethics In The Making

Author: Gary Dorrien
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444393790
Size: 15,85 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 800
Download

In the early 1880s, proponents of what came to be called “the social gospel” founded what is now known as social ethics. This ambitious and magisterial book describes the tradition of social ethics: one that began with the distinctly modern idea that Christianity has a social-ethical mission to transform the structures of society in the direction of social justice. Charts the story of social ethics - the idea that Christianity has a social-ethical mission to transform society - from its roots in the nineteenth century through to the present day Discusses and analyzes how different traditions of social ethics evolved in the realms of the academy, church, and general public Looks at the wide variety of individuals who have been prominent exponents of social ethics from academics and self-styled “public intellectuals” through to pastors and activists Set to become the definitive reference guide to the history and development of social ethics Recipient of a CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title for 2009 award

American History

Author: Alan Brinkley
Editor:
ISBN: 9780073033921
Size: 13,29 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 931
Download

Highly-respected for its impeccable scholarship and elegant writing style, American History: A Survey provides students and instructors with a comprehensive account of the American past in which no single approach or theme predominates. From its first edition, this text has included a scrupulous account of American political and diplomatic history. Today, however, the book explores areas of history such as social, cultural, urban, racial and ethnic history, more history of the West and South, environmental history, and the history of women and gender. In addition, American history has not evolved in a vacuum, but as part of a larger global world. The eleventh edition of this text places American history into that global context, making connections for students who live in an ever-expanding world themselves.

The Social Gospel In Black And White

Author: Ralph Luker
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 16,79 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Read: 866
Download

Examines the impact of the new wave of black and white reformers, many of them social Christians, who struggled for solutions to Americas racial problems between 1885 and 1912.

Bound For The Promised Land

Author: Milton C. Sernett
Editor: Duke Univ Pr
ISBN:
Size: 14,13 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 914
Download

Bound for the Promised Landis the first extensive examination of the impact on the American religious landscape of the Great Migration-the movement from South to North and from country to city by hundreds of thousands of African Americans following World War I. In focusing on this phenomenonrs"s religious and cultural implications, Milton C. Sernett breaks with traditional patterns of historiography that analyze the migration in terms of socioeconomic considerations. Drawing on a range of sources-interviews, government documents, church periodicals, books, pamphlets, and articles-Sernett shows how the mass migration created an institutional crisis for black religious leaders. He describes the creative tensions that resulted when the southern migrants who saw their exodus as the Second Emancipation brought their religious beliefs and practices into northern cities such as Chicago, and traces the resulting emergence of the belief that black churches ought to be more than places for "praying and preaching." Explaining how this social gospel perspective came to dominate many of the classic studies of African American religion,Bound for the Promised Landsheds new light on various components of the development of black religion, including philanthropic endeavors to "modernize" the southern black rural church. In providing a balanced and holistic understanding of black religion in postWorld War I America,Bound for the Promised Landserves to reveal the challenges presently confronting this vital component of Americars"s religious mosaic.