Why Punish How Much

Author: Michael H. Tonry
Editor: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 019532885X
Size: 17,80 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Punishment, like all complex human institutions, tends to change as ways of thinking go in and out of fashion. Normative, political, social, psychological, and legal ideas concerning punishment have changed drastically over time, and especially in recent decades. Why Punish? How Much? collects essays from classical philosophers and contemporary theorists to examine these shifts. Michael Tonry has gathered a comprehensive set of readings ranging from Kant, Hegel, and Bentham to recent writings on developments in the behavioral and medical sciences. Together they cover foundations of punishment theory such as consequentialism, retributivism, and functionalism, new approaches like restorative, communitarian, and therapeutic justice, and mixed approaches that attempt to link theory and policy. This volume includes an accessible introduction that chronicles the development of punishment systems and theorizing over the course of the last two centuries. Why Punish? How Much? provides a fresh and comprehensive approach to thinking about punishment and sentencing for a broad range of law, sociology, philosophy, and criminology courses.

Why Punish

Author: Rob Canton
Editor: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 1137449047
Size: 11,23 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Why do we punish? Is it because only punishment can achieve justice for victims and 'right the wrong' of a crime? Or is it justified because it reduces crime, by deterring potential offenders, offering rehabilitative treatment to others and incapacitating the most dangerous? The complex answers to this enduring question vary across time and place, and are directly linked to people's personal, cultural, social, religious and ethical commitments and even their sense of identity. This unique introduction to the philosophy of punishment provides a systematic analysis of the themes of retribution, deterrence, rehabilitation, incapacitation and restorative justice. Integrating philosophical, sociological, political and ethical perspectives, it provides a thorough and wide-ranging discussion of the purposes, meanings and justifications of punishment for crime and the extent to which punishment does, could or should live up to what it claims to achieve. Why Punish? challenges criminology and criminal justice students as well as policy makers, judges, magistrates and criminal justice practitioners to think more critically about the role of punishment and the moral principles that underpin it. Bridging abstract theory with the realities of practice, Rob Canton asks what better punishment would look like and how it can be achieved.

Neuroscience For Social Work

Author: Holly C. Matto, PhD
Editor: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 0826108776
Size: 13,60 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This clear and accessible guideówritten by social workers for social workersódescribes the most current developments in neuroscience and their practical applications for social work in education, child welfare, health, mental health, and criminal justice settings. The contributions of social work experts in these key areas of practice make this vast and ever-expanding body of neuroscientific knowledge easily understandable, with specific relevance to understanding the impact of the environment on neural mechanisms and human life course trajectories. The text examines how neuroimaging can be used to examine psychosocial treatment efficacy, discusses cross-system programmatic and policy implications that respond to the way in which toxic environments and early disrupted attachment affect brain and behavior, and addresses the importance of bioethics to inform the integration of neuroscience into social work practice. This is the only text on this topic with chapters organized around five practice settings and embedded with application skills across micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Each chapter includes an overview of the latest scientific research pertaining to the topic and discusses implications for assessment, prevention, intervention, policy, research, and ethics. Real-world case studies in each chapter enhance practice applications. Key Features: Describes the latest applications of neuroscience across social work settings in education, child welfare, health, mental health, and criminal justice Examines latest neuroscientific research for each topic and its implications for assessment, prevention, intervention, policy issues, research, and ethical/legal issues Draws clear practical implications in each chapter Written by social workers for social workers Includes the contributions of noted social work researchers, faculty, and practitioners

The Oxford Handbook Of Crime And Public Policy

Author: Michael Tonry
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199844658
Size: 19,38 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Much of the scholarly literature and principal books on criminal justice and crime control policy take the operations of the criminal justice system, the causes of crime and delinquency, theories about crime and justice, and crime prevention as the central topics for study and policy analysis. But law enforcement and public officials create policy responses to specific crimes, not broad categories of offenses. In order to develop the most effective policies, one needs to understand why particular crimes occur and what approaches might best prevent them or minimize the harm they cause. Taking this fresh perspective, The Oxford Handbook of Crime and Public Policy offers a comprehensive examination of crimes as public policy subjects. Michael Tonry, a leading authority on criminology, has brought together the most distinguished active scholars in the field to present a wide-ranging overview and analysis of violent and sexual crimes, property crimes, transactional crimes, transnational crimes, and crimes against morality. The crimes investigated range from often-discussed offenses (homicide, auto theft, sexual violence) to those that only recently began to receive attention (child abuse, domestic violence, environmental crimes); it includes new crimes (identity theft, cybercrime) as well as age-old crimes (drug abuse, gambling, prostitution). Written in a straightforward and accessible manner, each chapter explains why crimes happen, how often, and what we know about efforts to prevent or control them. Aimed at a wide audience of scholars, students, and policy makers, the Handbook is the definitive reference work on crimes and public policy responses to them.

The End Of Prisons

Author: Mechthild E. Nagel
Editor: Rodopi
ISBN: 9401209235
Size: 20,97 MB
Format: PDF
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This book brings together a collection of social justice scholars and activists who take Foucault’s concept of discipline and punishment to explain how prisons are constructed in society from nursing homes to zoos. This book expands the concept of prison to include any institution that dominates, oppresses, and controls. Criminologists and others, who have been concerned with reforming or dismantling the criminal justice system, have mostly avoided to look at larger carceral structures in society. In this book, for example, scholars and activists question the way patriarchy has incapacitated women and imagine the deinstitutionalization of people with disabilities. In a time when popular sentiment critiques the dominant role of the elites (the “one percenters”), the state’s role in policing dissenting voices, school children, LGBTQ persons, people of color, and American Indian Nations, needs to be investigated. A prison, as defined in this book, is an institution or system that oppresses and does not allow freedom for a particular group. Within this definition, we include the imprisonment of nonhuman animals and plants, which are too often overlooked.

Discipline Punish

Author: Michel Foucault
Editor: Vintage
ISBN: 0307819299
Size: 10,43 MB
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In this brilliant work, the most influential philosopher since Sartre suggests that such vaunted reforms as the abolition of torture and the emergence of the modern penitentiary have merely shifted the focus of punishment from the prisoner's body to his soul.

A Reader On Punishment

Author: Antony Duff
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780198763536
Size: 11,67 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Why we punish, who we punish, and how we punish are central elements of any discussion of the role of law in modern society. In this impressive collection, two leading experts on the theory of punishment have selected a range of articles which have made important and influential contributions to the way in which punishment is understood in contemporary society. The collection is prefaced by an original introduction written by the two editors, in which key concepts are identified. Each article is also prefaced by a short introduction setting out the issues to be discussed. Throughout the book the aim of the editors is to demonstrate that normative and empirical questions about punishment are deeply interrelated, and to show the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to understanding this vital social institution.

Punishment And Responsibility

Author: H. L. A. Hart
Editor: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191021776
Size: 12,67 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This classic collection of essays, first published in 1968, has had an enduring impact on academic and public debates about criminal responsibility and criminal punishment. Forty years on, its arguments are as powerful as ever. H.L.A. Hart offers an alternative to retributive thinking about criminal punishment that nevertheless preserves the central distinction between guilt and innocence. He also provides an account of criminal responsibility that links the distinction between guilt and innocence closely to the ideal of the rule of law, and thereby attempts to by-pass unnerving debates about free will and determinism. Always engaged with live issues of law and public policy, Hart makes difficult philosophical puzzles accessible and immediate to a wide range of readers. For this new edition, otherwise a reproduction of the original, John Gardner adds an introduction engaging critically with Hart's arguments, and explaining the continuing importance of Hart's ideas in spite of the intervening revival of retributive thinking in both academic and policy circles. Unavailable for ten years, the new edition of Punishment and Responsibility makes available again the central text in the field for a new generation of academics, students and professionals engaged in criminal justice and penal policy.

Foundational Texts In Modern Criminal Law

Author: Markus D Dubber
Editor: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191654620
Size: 12,12 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Foundational Texts in Modern Criminal Law presents essays in which scholars from various countries and legal systems engage critically with formative texts in criminal legal thought since Hobbes. It examines the emergence of a transnational canon of criminal law by documenting its intellectual and disciplinary history and provides a snapshot of contemporary work on criminal law within that historical and comparative context. Criminal law discourse has become, and will continue to become, more international and comparative, and in this sense global: the long-standing parochialism of criminal law scholarship and doctrine is giving way to a broad exploration of the foundations of modern criminal law. The present book advances this promising scholarly and doctrinal project by making available key texts, including several not previously available in English translation, from the common law and civil law traditions, accompanied by contributions from leading representatives of both systems.

Why Punish

Author: Nigel Walker
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN:
Size: 15,16 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 609
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