Women Of The Klan

Author: Kathleen M. Blee
Editor: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520942929
Size: 13,20 MB
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Ignorant. Brutal. Male. One of these stereotypes of the Ku Klux Klan offers a misleading picture. In Women of the Klan, sociologist Kathleen M. Blee dismantles the popular notion that politically involved women are always inspired by pacifism, equality, and justice. In her new preface, Blee reflects on how recent scholarship on gender and right-wing extremism suggests new ways to understand women's place in the 1920s Klan's crusade for white and Christian supremacy.

Women Of The Klan

Author: Kathleen M. Blee
Editor: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520257871
Size: 14,52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 755
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Ignorant. Brutal. Male. One of these stereotypes of the Ku Klux Klan offers a misleading picture. In Women of the Klan, sociologist Kathleen M. Blee dismantles the popular notion that politically involved women are always inspired by pacifism, equality, and justice. In her new preface, Blee reflects on how recent scholarship on gender and right-wing extremism suggests new ways to understand women's place in the 1920s Klan's crusade for white and Christian supremacy.

Women Of The Klan

Author: Kathleen M. Blee
Editor: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520078765
Size: 17,55 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Describes how the women's branch of the Klan in Indiana recruited members into their racist, anti-Semitic, and anti-Catholic organization by emphasizing support for white Protestant women's rights and the family

Inside Organized Racism

Author: Kathleen M. Blee
Editor: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520240553
Size: 14,67 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Publisher Fact Sheet Why women join hate groups, how they participate in them, & why they stay.

One Hundred Percent American

Author: Thomas R. Pegram
Editor: Ivan R. Dee
ISBN: 1566639220
Size: 13,84 MB
Format: PDF
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In the 1920s, a revived Ku Klux Klan burst into prominence as a self-styled defender of American values, a magnet for white Protestant community formation, and a would-be force in state and national politics. But the hooded bubble burst at mid-decade, and the social movement that had attracted several million members and additional millions of sympathizers collapsed into insignificance. Since the 1990s, intensive community-based historical studies have reinterpreted the 1920s Klan. Rather than the violent, racist extremists of popular lore and current observation, 1920s Klansmen appear in these works as more mainstream figures. Sharing a restrictive American identity with most native-born white Protestants after World War I, hooded knights pursued fraternal fellowship, community activism, local reforms, and paid close attention to public education, law enforcement (especially Prohibition), and moral/sexual orthodoxy. No recent general history of the 1920s Klan movement reflects these new perspectives on the Klan. One Hundred Percent American incorporates them while also highlighting the racial and religious intolerance, violent outbursts, and political ambition that aroused widespread opposition to the Invisible Empire. Balanced and comprehensive, One Hundred Percent American explains the Klan's appeal, its limitations, and the reasons for its rapid decline in a society confronting the reality of cultural and religious pluralism.

Women Of The Klan

Author: John Davis BA JD LLM
Editor: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781507710937
Size: 19,75 MB
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This short-read compares the actual and theoretical similarities between the "Invisible Empire" known as the Women's Ku Klux Klan, and modern gynocentrism or feminism. The KKK originated in the Southern United States in 1865, in part, to perpetuate the "chivalry" of the South in favor of women. The gynocentric chauvinism of the Klan, historically, has been identical to the gynocentric exclusivity of modern feminism. The book shows how the women's suffrage movement in the U.S. was really a KKK motivated campaign to dilute the voting power of African-American men conveyed to those men under the Fifteenth Amendment. The book describes early American feminists who promoted racism in order to achieve gains, for women, at the expense of African-Americans struggling after the Civil War. The book is well-documented, with endnotes, with citations to notable works by both men and women authors.

No Middle Ground

Author: Kathleen M. Blee
Editor: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814712797
Size: 18,61 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In the first comprehensive study of election law since the Supreme Court decided Bush v. Gore, Richard L. Hasen rethinks the Court’s role in regulating elections. Drawing on the case files of the Warren, Burger, and Rehnquist courts, Hasen roots the Court’s intervention in political process cases to the landmark 1962 case, Baker v. Carr. The case opened the courts to a variety of election law disputes, to the point that the courts now control and direct major aspects of the American electoral process. The Supreme Court does have a crucial role to play in protecting a socially constructed “core” of political equality principles, contends Hasen, but it should leave contested questions of political equality to the political process itself. Under this standard, many of the Court’s most important election law cases from Baker to Bush have been wrongly decided.

Women Of The Right

Author: Kathleen M. Blee
Editor: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271052163
Size: 18,21 MB
Format: PDF
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"An interdisciplinary collection of essays examining the role of women in right-wing political activism around the world, from the Afrikaner movement in South Africa in the early twentieth century to the supporters of Sarah Palin in the United States"--Provided by publisher.

Understanding Racist Activism

Author: Kathleen M. Blee
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 131546151X
Size: 11,66 MB
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White supremacist groups are highly secretive, so their public propaganda tells us little about their operations or the people they attract. To understand the world of organized racism it is necessary to study it from the inside by talking to their members and observing their groups. Doing so reveals a disturbing picture of how fairly ordinary white people learn to embrace the vicious ideas and dangerous agendas of white supremacism. This book takes the reader inside organized racism, revealing the kind of women and men who join groups, such as the Ku Klux Klan or neo-Nazi skinheads, and what they do in those groups. The volume collects significant published works from renowned scholar Kathleen M. Blee's work on racist activism, alongside new essays on the theories, methods, and approaches of studying racist activism. Discussing topics such as emotional issues in research, the place of violence and hate in white supremacism, and how women are involved in racial terrorism, Blee makes use of a range of sources, including oral histories, ethnographic observations, and interviews, to shape her findings. Written by the pioneer and leading scholar of women in racist activism, this volume is essential reading for students, scholars, and general readers interested in the areas of social movements, politics, race studies, and American history.

Behind The Mask Of Chivalry

Author: Nancy K. MacLean
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198023650
Size: 15,85 MB
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On Thanksgiving night, 1915, a small band of hooded men gathered atop Stone Mountain, an imposing granite butte just outside Atlanta. With a flag fluttering in the wind beside them, a Bible open to the twelfth chapter of Romans, and a flaming cross to light the night sky above, William Joseph Simmons and his disciples proclaimed themselves the new Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, named for the infamous secret order in which many of their fathers had served after the Civil War. Unsure of their footing in the New South and longing for the provincial, patriarchal world of the past, the men of the second Klan saw themselves as an army in training for a war between the races. They boasted that they had bonded into "an invisible phalanx...to stand as impregnable as a tower against every encroachment upon the white man's liberty...in the white man's country, under the white man's flag." Behind the Mask of Chivalry brings the "invisible phalanx" into broad daylight, culling from history the names, the life stories, and the driving passions of the anonymous Klansmen beneath the white hoods and robes. Using an unusual and rich cache of internal Klan records from Athens, Georgia, to anchor her observations, author Nancy MacLean combines a fine-grained portrait of a local Klan world with a penetrating analysis of the second Klan's ideas and politics nationwide. No other right-wing movement has ever achieved as much power as the Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s, and this book shows how and why it did. MacLean reveals that the movement mobilized its millions of American followers largely through campaigns waged over issues that today would be called "family values": Prohibition violation, premarital sex, lewd movies, anxieties about women's changing roles, and worries over waning parental authority. Neither elites nor "poor white trash," most of the Klan rank and file were married, middle-aged, and middle class. Local meetings, or klonklaves, featured readings of the minutes, plans for recruitment campaigns and Klan barbecues, and distribution of educational materials--Christ and Other Klansmen was one popular tome. Nonetheless, as mundane as proceedings often were at the local level, crusades over "morals" always operated in the service of the Klan's larger agenda of virulent racial hatred and middle-class revanchism. The men who deplored sex among young people and sought to restore the power of husbands and fathers were also sworn to reclaim the "white man's country," striving to take the vote from blacks and bar immigrants. Comparing the Klan to the European fascist movements that grew out of the crucible of the first World War, MacLean maintains that the remarkable scope and frenzy of the movement reflected less on members' power within their communities than on the challenges to that power posed by African Americans, Jews, Catholics, immigrants, and white women and youth who did not obey the Klan's canon of appropriate conduct. In vigilante terror, the Klan's night riders acted out their movement's brutal determination to maintain inherited hierarchies of race, class, and gender. Compellingly readable and impeccably researched, The Mask of Chivalry is an unforgettable investigation of a crucial era in American history, and the social conditions, cultural currents, and ordinary men that built this archetypal American reactionary movement.