A World Restored

Author: Henry Kissinger
Editor: Pickle Partners Publishing
ISBN: 1787204367
Size: 10,46 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 821
Download

Originally published in 1957—years before he was Secretary of State and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize—, Henry Kissinger wrote A World Restored, to understand and explain one of history’s most important and dramatic periods; a time when Europe went from political chaos to a balanced peace that lasted for almost a hundred years. After the fall of Napoleon, European diplomats gathered in a festive Vienna with the task of restoring stability following the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars, and the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire. The central figures at the Congress of Vienna were the Foreign Secretary of the United Kingdom, Viscount Castlereagh and the Foreign Minister of Austria Klemens Wenzel von Mettern Metternich. Castlereagh was primarily concerned with maintaining balanced powers, while Metternich based his diplomacy on the idea of legitimacy—that is, establishing and working with governments that citizens accept without force. The peace they brokered lasted until the outbreak of World War I. Through trenchant analysis of the history and forces that create stability, A World Restored gives insight into how to create long-lasting geopolitical peace-lessons that Kissinger saw as applicable to the period immediately following World War II, when he was writing this book. But the lessons don’t stop there. Like all good insights, the book’s wisdom transcends any single political period. Kissinger’s understanding of coalitions and balance of power can be applied to personal and professional situations, such as dealing with a tyrannical boss or co-worker or formulating business or organizational tactics. Regardless of his ideology, Henry Kissinger has had an important impact on modern politics and few would dispute his brilliance as a strategist. For anyone interested in Western history, the tactics of diplomacy, or political strategy, this volume will provide deep understanding of a pivotal time.

A World Restored

Author: Henry Kissinger
Editor: Odyssey Editions
ISBN: 1623730112
Size: 19,81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 103
Download

Few periods illustrate so well the dilemma posed by the appearance of a revolutionary power; and the problems of organizing a legitimate order, as the decade after the Napoleonic Wars. Revolutionary France had refused to accept the legitimacy of the existing European balance of power, which had operated so intricately throughout the eighteenth century. Disputes no longer concerned the adjustment of differences within an accepted framework, but the validity of the framework itself. In 1812, when Napoleon was defeated by Russia, the problem of constructing a legitimate order confronted Europe in its most concrete form. This year marked the moment when it became evident that Europe was not to be organized by force. But the alternative was not nearly so apparent. It was clear that there were new forces loose in the world clamoring for popular participation in government. But it seemed equally evident that these forces had been responsible for a quarter-century of turmoil. Surprisingly, the settlement that emerged provided a peace lasting almost a hundred years, realized without a major war or permanent revolution. That Europe by 1822 rescued stability from seeming chaos was primarily the result of the work of two great diplomats: Viscount Castlereagh, the British foreign secretary, and Prince von Metternich, Austria’s foreign minister. Henry Kissinger explains how the turbulent relationship between these two men, the differing concerns of their respective countries, and the changing nature of diplomacy influenced the final shape of the new international order. Part political biography, part diplomatic history,A World Restored analyses the alliances formed and treaties signed by the world's leaders during the years 1812 to 1822, the conference system and congresses that gave rise to the European order that would last until the outbreak of World War I, and the tactics and philosophies behind the negotiation of peace. Kissinger’s first book is a powerfully argued manifesto on the nature of statesmanship.

Henry Kissinger And The American Approach To Foreign Policy

Author: Cleva
Editor: Bucknell University Press
ISBN: 9780838751473
Size: 13,10 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 751
Download

This analysis of Henry Kissinger's historical philosophy, statecraft, and views on international politics reveals Kissinger to be a transitional figure who urged a conversion of American foreign policy from an insular to a continental approach.

A World Restored

Author: Henry Kissinger
Editor: Boston : Houghton Mifflin
ISBN:
Size: 10,13 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 939
Download

Subtitle on cover: Europe after Napoleon : the politics of conservatism in a revolutionary age. Includes index. Bibliography: p. 333-346.

Orders Of Exclusion

Author: Kyle M. Lascurettes
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190068574
Size: 12,28 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Read: 176
Download

When and why do powerful countries seek to enact major changes to international order, the broad set of rules that guide behavior in world politics? This question is particularly important today given the Trump administration's clear disregard for the reigning liberal international order in the United States. Across the globe, there is also uncertainty over what China might seek to replace that order with as it continues to amass power and influence. Together, these developments mean that what motivates great powers to shape and change order will remain at the forefront of debates over the future of world politics. Prior studies have focused on how the origins of international orders have been consensus-driven and inclusive. By contrast, Kyle M. Lascurettes argues in Orders of Exclusion that the propelling motivation for great power order building has typically been exclusionary. Dominant powers pursue fundamental changes to order when they perceive a major new threat on the horizon. Moreover, they do so for the purpose of targeting this perceived threat, be it another powerful state or a foreboding ideological movement. The goal of foundational rule writing in international relations, then, is blocking that threatening entity from amassing further influence, a motive Lascurettes illustrates at work across more than three hundred years of history. Far from falling outside of the bounds of traditional statecraft, order building is the continuation of power politics by other means.

Byron

Author: Jonathan David Gross
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742511620
Size: 12,85 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 535
Download

The photographic essay The Lace Curtains of Berlin is a kind of archaeological experiment, studying studies things used by a certain group of people in order to investigate who they are. The people in question are the Berliners and the things studied are their lace curtains. Though oblivious to most people, the curtains send out messages and tell almost as much about the people behind them as many an anthropological study would. The Lace Curtains of Berlin is the graphic, non-fiction part of the Twin Projects: Berlin. The fiction part is the novel The Games. There is a character in the novel called Rainer-Werner Sprengberg who photographs lace curtains. These are "his" curtains. The 196 pictures shown in this book are only a very small sample of what is available. There are literally hundreds of different kinds. To those readers who will make it to Berlin, it's like an appetizer. To the majority who won't, it's the only chance to experience this wonderful example of textile poetry. You will need time to educate your eye. At first glance the curtains do not look beautiful. They seem ugly, tacky, sometimes even barbaric, the textile equivalent to sauerkraut with bratwurst. But take your time. Just walk around. It's a wonderful experience. With time you will learn to differentiate between them, to delight on the "variations on the same theme." You will rejoice when you discover a new type. Sometimes you will laugh out loud, other times you will want to cry even louder. Slowly your feelings toward the curtains will change. And here comes the scariest part: someday you will lose all your inhibitions and will start to love them. Because they transcend their tackiness! The lace curtains of Berlin are the proof that tackiness, when taken to extremes, can acquire a poetic dimension.

Kissinger And Brzezinski

Author: Gerry Argyris Andrianopoulos
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1349217417
Size: 17,89 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 372
Download

Going beyond superficial comparisons of Kissinger and Brzezinski, this study, by comparing their views on world politics and on strategy and tactics for achieving national goals and examining the consistency of their beliefs and actions while in and out of office, finds that, despite Brzezinski's attacks on Kissinger, he shared many of his views and copied many of his actions while in office and that their policy-making behaviour was, indeed, strongly influenced by their shared beliefs.

Syrian Identity In The Greco Roman World

Author: Nathanael J. Andrade
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107244560
Size: 17,39 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 289
Download

By engaging with recent developments in the study of empires, this book examines how inhabitants of Roman imperial Syria reinvented expressions and experiences of Greek, Roman and Syrian identification. It demonstrates how the organization of Greek communities and a peer polity network extending citizenship to ethnic Syrians generated new semiotic frameworks for the performance of Greekness and Syrianness. Within these, Syria's inhabitants reoriented and interwove idioms of diverse cultural origins, including those from the Near East, to express Greek, Roman and Syrian identifications in innovative and complex ways. While exploring a vast array of written and material sources, the book thus posits that Greekness and Syrianness were constantly shifting and transforming categories, and it critiques many assumptions that govern how scholars of antiquity often conceive of Roman imperial Greek identity, ethnicity and culture in the Roman Near East, and processes of 'hybridity' or similar concepts.

Examination Of Mr Maurice S Theological Essays

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 20,20 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 790
Download


Napoleon

Author: Munro Price
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199380694
Size: 15,44 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 325
Download

On April 20, 1814, after a dizzying series of battles, campaigns, and diplomatic intrigues, a defeated Napoleon Bonaparte made his farewell speech to the Old Guard in the courtyard of the Chateau de Fontainebleau and set off for exile on the island of Elba. Napoleonic legend asserts that the Emperor was brought down by foreign powers determined to destroy him and discredit his achievements, with the aid of highly placed domestic traitors. Others argue that once Napoleon's military defeats began in 1812, his fall became inevitable. But in fact, as Munro Price shows in this brilliant new book, Napoleon's fall could have been avoided altogether. Exploring a critical and often neglected period of Napoleonic history between 1812 and 1814, Napoleon: The End of Glory offers a more complete picture of the Emperor's decline and fall than any previous work. Price analyzes the political, military, and diplomatic events of the period, from Napoleon's disastrous invasion of Russia in 1812 to the multiple failed attempts by Austria to broker peace. He illuminates the dynamic relationships between Napoleon and the wily Austrian foreign minister Metternich-whose desire for equilibrium within the European states system clashed with Napoleon's unshakeable belief in hegemony and subjection-and the charming and enigmatic Alexander I of Russia. And he explores the lasting impact of the bloody Terror of the French Revolution on Napoleon's decisions once he came to power. Rejecting the assumption that defeat was unavoidable, Price considers instead why Napoleon failed to explore a compromise peace that could have allowed him to keep his crown, arguing that the answer to this question has powerful implications for our understanding of the Napoleonic wars. Ultimately, Price provides a convincing portrait of the Emperor's decline, exposing his blindness, intransigence and miscalculations; his preference for war and his declining ability to wage it; and his nearly pathological fear of a dishonorable peace. A deeply researched study of the moment of a great man's fall, Napoleon: The End of Glory forces us to reconsider Napoleon's character, motives, and the reasons for his spectacular failure.