American Bee Journal

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Includes summarized reports of many bee-keeper associations.

Beekeeping A Compressive Guide To Bees And Beekeeping

Author: Abrol, D.P.
Editor: Scientific Publishers
ISBN: 9386237628
Size: 17,84 MB
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This book shall serve as a reference book for students, teachers, and researchers and for all those interested in bees and beekeeping. This book will be useful to all those who wish to make beekeeping their hobby or as profession, entrepreneurs and even layman. Besides, the information provided in this book will be useful to pollination biologists, students, teachers, scientists of agriculture, animal behaviour, botany, conservation, biology, ecology, entomology, environmental biology, forestry, genetics, plant breeding, horticulture, toxicology, zoology, seed growers and seed agencies. It will be highly useful to motivate the young generation to fascinating world of honeybees and adopt beekeeping as a profession. Book as a guide for their problems & evolving strategies.

Bees In America

Author: Tammy Horn
Editor: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813172063
Size: 14,86 MB
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Honey bees--and the qualities associated with them--have quietly influenced American values for four centuries. During every major period in the country's history, bees and beekeepers have represented order and stability in a country without a national religion, political party, or language. Bees in America is an enlightening cultural history of bees and beekeeping in the United States. Tammy Horn, herself a beekeeper, offers a varied social and technological history from the colonial period, when the British first introduced bees to the New World, to the present, when bees are being used by the American military to detect bombs. Early European colonists introduced bees to the New World as part of an agrarian philosophy borrowed from the Greeks and Romans. Their legacy was intended to provide sustenance and a livelihood for immigrants in search of new opportunities, and the honey bee became a sign of colonization, alerting Native Americans to settlers' westward advance. Colonists imagined their own endeavors in terms of bees' hallmark traits of industry and thrift and the image of the busy and growing hive soon shaped American ideals about work, family, community, and leisure. The image of the hive continued to be popular in the eighteenth century, symbolizing a society working together for the common good and reflecting Enlightenment principles of order and balance. Less than a half-century later, Mormons settling Utah (where the bee is the state symbol) adopted the hive as a metaphor for their protected and close-knit culture that revolved around industry, harmony, frugality, and cooperation. In the Great Depression, beehives provided food and bartering goods for many farm families, and during World War II, the War Food Administration urged beekeepers to conserve every ounce of beeswax their bees provided, as more than a million pounds a year were being used in the manufacture of war products ranging from waterproofing products to tape. The bee remains a bellwether in modern America. Like so many other insects and animals, the bee population was decimated by the growing use of chemical pesticides in the 1970s. Nevertheless, beekeeping has experienced a revival as natural products containing honey and beeswax have increased the visibility and desirability of the honey bee. Still a powerful representation of success, the industrious honey bee continues to serve both as a source of income and a metaphor for globalization as America emerges as a leader in the Information Age.

Beeconomy

Author: Tammy Horn
Editor: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813134366
Size: 11,92 MB
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Queen bee. Worker bees. Busy as a bee. These phrases have shaped perceptions of women for centuries, but how did these stereotypes begin? Who are the women who keep bees and what can we learn from them? Beeconomy examines the fascinating evolution of the relationship between women and bees around the world. From Africa to Australia to Asia, women have participated in the pragmatic aspects of honey hunting and in the more advanced skills associated with beekeeping as hive technology has advanced through the centuries. Synthesizing the various aspects of hive-related products, such as beewax and cosmetics, as well as the more specialized skills of queen production and knowledge-based economies of research and science, noted bee expert Tammy Horn documents how and why women should consider being beekeepers. The women profiled in the book suggest ways of managing careers, gender discrimination, motherhood, marriage, and single-parenting -- all while enjoying the community created by women who work with honey bees. Horn finds in beekeeping an opportunity for a new sustainable economy, one that takes into consideration environment, children, and family needs. Beeconomy not only explores globalization, food history, gender studies, and politics; it is a collective call to action.

Bibliography Of Commonwealth Apiculture

Author: Commonwealth Secretariat
Editor: Commonwealth Secretariat
ISBN: 0850927714
Size: 13,61 MB
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"From the databases of the International Bee Research Association."

The Medico Chirurgical Review And Journal Of Practical Medicine

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Size: 12,76 MB
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The Journals Of The Lewis And Clark Expedition April 7 July 27 1805

Author: Gary E. Moulton
Editor: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803228771
Size: 14,59 MB
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When the Atlas of the Lewis and Clark Expedition appeared in 1983 critics hailed it as a publishing landmark in western history. Fully living up to the promise of the first volume were the second volume, which began the actual journals and brought the expedition through its first year to August 1804, and the third volume, which brought the explorers through a winter at Fort Mandan, present North Dakota, and to April 1805. This eagerly awaited fourth volume begins on April 7, 1805, when Meriwether Lewis and William Clark and their permanent party set out from Fort Mandan, traveling up-river along the banks of the Missouri. For the first time they entered country never explored by whites. With the help of the Shoshone Indian woman Sacagawea, they hoped to make friendly contact with her people, then cross the Rocky Mountains and eventually reach the Pacific. They were to spend the rest of the spring and the early summer toiling up the Missouri, or around its perilous falls. Along the way, they encountered grizzly bears, cataloged new species of plants and animals, and mapped rivers and streams. Sacagawea recognized landmarks; meeting her people became the next great concern of the expedition when they reached the three forks of the Missouri in late July. Superseding the last edition, published early in this century, the current edition contains new materials discovered since then. It expands and updates the annotation to take account of the most recent scholarship on the many subject touched on by the journals.