Move On Up

Author: Aaron Cohen
Editor: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022665303X
File Size: 63,65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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A Chicago Tribune Book of 2019, Notable Chicago Reads A Booklist Top 10 Arts Book of 2019 A No Depression Top Music Book of 2019 Curtis Mayfield. The Chi-Lites. Chaka Khan. Chicago’s place in the history of soul music is rock solid. But for Chicagoans, soul music in its heyday from the 1960s to the 1980s was more than just a series of hits: it was a marker and a source of black empowerment. In Move On Up, Aaron Cohen tells the remarkable story of the explosion of soul music in Chicago. Together, soul music and black-owned businesses thrived. Record producers and song-writers broadcast optimism for black America’s future through their sophisticated, jazz-inspired productions for the Dells and many others. Curtis Mayfield boldly sang of uplift with unmistakable grooves like “We’re a Winner” and “I Plan to Stay a Believer.” Musicians like Phil Cohran and the Pharaohs used their music to voice Afrocentric philosophies that challenged racism and segregation, while Maurice White of Earth, Wind, and Fire and Chaka Khan created music that inspired black consciousness. Soul music also accompanied the rise of African American advertisers and the campaign of Chicago’s first black mayor, Harold Washington, in 1983. This empowerment was set in stark relief by the social unrest roiling in Chicago and across the nation: as Chicago’s homegrown record labels produced rising stars singing songs of progress and freedom, Chicago’s black middle class faced limited economic opportunities and deep-seated segregation, all against a backdrop of nationwide deindustrialization. Drawing on more than one hundred interviews and a music critic’s passion for the unmistakable Chicago soul sound, Cohen shows us how soul music became the voice of inspiration and change for a city in turmoil.
Chicago Soul
Language: en
Pages: 408
Authors: Robert Pruter
Categories: Music
Type: BOOK - Published: 1992 - Publisher: University of Illinois Press

Chicago Soul chronicles the emergence of Chicago soul music out of the city's thriving rhythm-and-blues industry from the late 1950s through the late 1970s. The performers, A&R men, producers, distributors, deejays, studios, and labels that made it all happen take center stage in this first book to document the stunning
Move On Up
Language: en
Pages: 254
Authors: Aaron Cohen
Categories: Music
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-09-25 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press

A Chicago Tribune Book of 2019, Notable Chicago Reads A Booklist Top 10 Arts Book of 2019 A No Depression Top Music Book of 2019 Curtis Mayfield. The Chi-Lites. Chaka Khan. Chicago’s place in the history of soul music is rock solid. But for Chicagoans, soul music in its heyday
The Chicago Food Encyclopedia
Language: en
Pages: 352
Authors: Carol Haddix, Bruce Kraig
Categories: Cooking
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-08-16 - Publisher: University of Illinois Press

The Chicago Food Encyclopedia is a far-ranging portrait of an American culinary paradise. Hundreds of entries deliver all of the visionary restauranteurs, Michelin superstars, beloved haunts, and food companies of today and yesterday. More than 100 sumptuous images include thirty full-color photographs that transport readers to dining rooms and food
Southern Soul-Blues
Language: en
Pages: 344
Authors: David G. Whiteis
Categories: Music
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-05-01 - Publisher: University of Illinois Press

Attracting passionate fans primarily among African American listeners in the South, Southern Soul draws on such diverse influences as the blues, 1960s-era Deep Soul, contemporary R & B, neosoul, rap, hip-hop, and gospel. Aggressively danceable, lyrically evocative, and fervidly emotional, Southern Soul songs often portray unabashedly carnal themes, and audiences
A Critical History of Soul Train on Television
Language: en
Pages: 239
Authors: Christopher P. Lehman
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-04-16 - Publisher: McFarland

As a wildly popular local dance show, Soul Train provided a venue for Chicago's soul singers and political activists and gave African American teenagers their first significant chance to see and identify with their peers on television. The subsequent national series garnered even more popularity, establishing producer and host Don