Chronicling The Golden Age Of Astronomy

Author: Neil English
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 3319977075
Size: 11,30 MB
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The invention of the telescope at the dawning of the 17th century has revolutionized humanity's understanding of the Universe and our place within it. This book traces the development of the telescope over four centuries, as well as the many personalities who used it to uncover brand-new revelations about the Sun, Moon, planets, stars and distant galaxies. Starting with early observers such as Thomas Harriot, Galileo, Johannes Hevelius, Giovanni Domenico Cassini, Robert Hooke and Christian Huygens, the book explores how these early observers arrived at essentially correct ideas concerning the objects they studied. Moving into the 18th and 19th centuries, the author describes the increasing sophistication of telescopes both large and small, and the celebrated figures who used them so productively, including the Herschels, Charles Messier, William Lassell and the Earls of Rosse. Many great discoveries were also made with smaller instruments when placed in the capable hands of the Struve dynasty, F.W. Bessel, Angelo Secchi and S.W Burnham, to name but a few. Nor were all great observers of professional ilk. The book explores the contributions made by the 'clerical astronomers,' William Rutter Dawes, Thomas William Webb, T.E.R Philips and T.H.E.C Espin, as well as the lonely vigils of E.E. Barnard, William F. Denning and Charles Grover. And in the 20th century, the work of Percival Lowell, Leslie Peltier, Eugene M. Antoniadi, Clyde Tombaugh, Walter Scott Houston, David H. Levy and Sir Patrick Moore is fully explored. Generously illustrated throughout, this treasure trove of astronomical history shows how each observer's work led to seminal developments in science, and providing key insights into how we go about exploring the heavens today.

The Shorttube 80 Telescope

Author: Neil T. English
Editor: Springer Nature
ISBN: 3030235572
Size: 11,80 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Welcome to the first comprehensive guide to one of the world’s most popular telescopes: the ShortTube 80 refractor. With its ultra-portability, versatility, and relatively low cost, this telescope continues to delight generations of stargazers. Starting in the field under a dark sky, the author walks the reader through a typical evening of stargazing, where the ShortTube 80 brings many astronomical treasures into focus. From there, he provides an in–depth account of the optical properties of the ShortTube 80 refractor and the accessories and mounting arrangements that maximize its potential both as a spotting ‘scope by day and an astronomical ‘scope by night. The main text discusses how the versatile ShortTube 80 can be used to study deep sky objects, the Sun, the Moon, bright planets and even high-resolution projects, where the instrument's features can be optimized for the observation of tight double and multiple stars. It explores how the ShortTube 80 can image targets using camera phones, DSLRs and dedicated astronomical CCD imagers. Packed with practical advice gained from years of firsthand stargazing experience, this book demonstrates exactly why ShortTube 80 has remained a firm favorite among amateur astronomers for over three decades, and why it is likely to remain popular for many years to come.

The Bad Ass Librarians Of Timbuktu

Author: Joshua Hammer
Editor: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1476777438
Size: 14,38 MB
Format: PDF
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To save ancient Arabic texts from Al Qaeda, a band of librarians pulls off a brazen heist worthy of Ocean’s Eleven in this “fast-paced narrative that is…part intellectual history, part geopolitical tract, and part out-and-out thriller” (The Washington Post). In the 1980s, a young adventurer and collector for a government library, Abdel Kader Haidara, journeyed across the Sahara Desert and along the Niger River, tracking down and salvaging tens of thousands of ancient Islamic and secular manuscripts that were crumbling in the trunks of desert shepherds. His goal: to preserve this crucial part of the world’s patrimony in a gorgeous library. But then Al Qaeda showed up at the door. “Part history, part scholarly adventure story, and part journalist survey….Joshua Hammer writes with verve and expertise” (The New York Times Book Review) about how Haidara, a mild-mannered archivist from the legendary city of Timbuktu, became one of the world’s greatest smugglers by saving the texts from sure destruction. With bravery and patience, Haidara organized a dangerous operation to sneak all 350,000 volumes out of the city to the safety of southern Mali. His heroic heist “has all the elements of a classic adventure novel” (The Seattle Times), and is a reminder that ordinary citizens often do the most to protect the beauty of their culture. His the story is one of a man who, through extreme circumstances, discovered his higher calling and was changed forever by it.

The Saturday Review Of Politics Literature Science And Art

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Size: 11,63 MB
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The Illustrated London News

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Size: 14,12 MB
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The Round Table

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Titian Remade

Author: Maria H. Loh
Editor: Getty Publications
ISBN: 9780892368730
Size: 12,67 MB
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Titian Remade explores imitation and the modern cult of originality through a consideration of the disparate fates of two Venetian painters: the canonized master Titian (ca. 1488-1576) and his artistic heir, the now-unremarked Padovanino (1588-1649). Reading the latter's Sleeping Venus (1610), triumph (1620), and Self-Portrait (ca. 1630) against corresponding works by Titian, Maria H. Loh argues the case for repetition as a positive act of artistic self-definition. Her history of creative emulation and engaged viewing in early modern visual culture offers a profound vision of art as a continual process of retrieval and projection that effectively bonds the present to the past and the self to the other.

Apocalyptic Anxiety

Author: Anthony Aveni
Editor: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 1607324717
Size: 14,73 MB
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Apocalyptic Anxiety traces the sources of American culture’s obsession with predicting and preparing for the apocalypse. Author Anthony Aveni explores why Americans take millennial claims seriously, where and how end-of-the-world predictions emerge, how they develop within a broader historical framework, and what we can learn from doomsday predictions of the past. The book begins with the Millerites, the nineteenth-century religious sect of Pastor William Miller, who used biblical calculations to predict October 22, 1844 as the date for the Second Advent of Christ. Aveni also examines several other religious and philosophical movements that have centered on apocalyptic themes—Christian millennialism, the New Age movement and the Age of Aquarius, and various other nineteenth- and early twentieth-century religious sects, concluding with a focus on the Maya mystery of 2012 and the contemporary prophets who connected the end of the world as we know it with the overturning of the Maya calendar. Apocalyptic Anxiety places these seemingly never-ending stories of the world’s end in the context of American history. This fascinating exploration of the deep historical and cultural roots of America’s voracious appetite for apocalypse will appeal to students of American history and the histories of religion and science, as well as lay readers interested in American culture and doomsday prophecies.