Underground Cities

Author: Mark Ovenden
Editor: White Lion Publishing
ISBN: 1781318948
File Size: 14,86 MB
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With over 60 per cent of the world’s population living in cities, the networks beneath our feet – which keep the cities above moving – are more important than ever before. Yet we never truly see how these amazing feats of engineering work. Just how deep do the tunnels go? Where do the sewers, bunkers and postal trains run? And, how many tunnels are there under our streets? Each featured city presents a ‘skyline of the underground’ through specially commissioned cut-away illustrations and unique cartography. Drawing on geography, cartography and historical oddities, Mark Ovenden explores what our cities look like from the bottom up.

Plans For Major Traffic Thoroughfares And Transit Lower East Side New York City Prepared For The Lower East Side Planning Association By Bartholomew And Associates

Author: Harland Bartholomew & Associates
Editor:
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File Size: 21,30 MB
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Minutes And Proceedings

Author: New York City Transit Authority
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 68,57 MB
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Proceedings Of The New York City Transit Authority Relating To Matters Other Than Operation

Author: New York City Transit Authority
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ISBN:
File Size: 43,68 MB
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From A Nickel To A Token

Author: Andrew J. Sparberg
Editor: Fordham Univ Press
ISBN: 0823261921
File Size: 35,22 MB
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Streetcars “are as dead as sailing ships,” said Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia in a radio speech, two days before Madison Avenue’s streetcars yielded to buses. LaGuardia was determined to eliminate streetcars, demolish pre-1900 elevated lines, and unify the subway system, a goal that became reality in 1940 when the separate IRT, BMT, and IND became one giant system under full public control. In this fascinating micro-history of New York’s transit system, Andrew Sparberg examines twenty specific events between 1940 and 1968, book ended by subway unification and the MTA’s creation. From a Nickel to a Token depicts a potpourri of well-remembered, partially forgotten, and totally obscure happenings drawn from the historical tapestry of New York mass transit. Sparberg deftly captures five boroughs of grit, chaos, and emotion grappling with a massive and unwieldy transit system. During these decades, the system morphed into today’s familiar network. The public sector absorbed most private surface lines operating within the five boroughs, and buses completely replaced streetcars. Elevated lines were demolished, replaced by subways or, along Manhattan’s Third Avenue, not at all. Beyond the unification of the IND, IRT, and BMT, strategic track connections were built between lines to allow a more flexible and unified operation. The oldest subway routes received much needed rehabilitation. Thousands of new subway cars and buses were purchased. The sacred nickel fare barrier was broken, and by 1968 a ride cost twenty cents. From LaGuardia to Lindsay, mayors devoted much energy to solving transit problems, keeping fares low, and appeasing voters, fellow elected officials, transit management, and labor leaders. Simultaneously, American society was experiencing tumultuous times, manifested by labor disputes, economic pressures, and civil rights protests. Featuring many photos never before published, From a Nickel to a Token is a historical trip back in time to a multitude of important events.

Bmt Canarsie Line Stations

Author: Books LLC
Editor: Books LLC, Wiki Series
ISBN: 9781155322834
File Size: 55,96 MB
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: 14th Street - Eighth Avenue (New York City Subway), 14th Street - Union Square (New York City Subway), Atlantic Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line), Bedford Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line), Broadway Junction (New York City Subway), Bushwick Avenue - Aberdeen Street (BMT Canarsie Line), Canarsie - Rockaway Parkway (BMT Canarsie Line), DeKalb Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line), East 105th Street (BMT Canarsie Line), First Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line), Graham Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line), Grand Street (BMT Canarsie Line), Halsey Street (BMT Canarsie Line), Jefferson Street (BMT Canarsie Line), Livonia Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line), Lorimer Street / Metropolitan Avenue (New York City Subway), Montrose Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line), Morgan Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line), Myrtle-Wyckoff Avenues (New York City Subway), New Lots Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line), Sixth Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line), Sutter Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line), Third Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line), Wilson Avenue (BMT Canarsie Line). Excerpt: 14th Street - Union Square is a New York City Subway station complex shared by the BMT Broadway Line, the BMT Canarsie Line and the IRT Lexington Avenue Line. It is located at the intersection of Fourth Avenue and 14th Street, underneath Union Square in Manhattan, and is served by the: The complex is the only location in the system where Canarsie Line riders as well as Broadway riders from Brooklyn can transfer to the heavily-used Lexington Avenue Line. 34,927,178 passengers entered this station in 2011, making it the fourth-busiest station of the New York City Subway. The complex located on the border of several neighborhoods with popular business, residential and nightlife destination spots, including the East Village to the southeast, Greenwich Village to the south and southwest, Chelsea to the northwest, and both the Flatiron District and Gramercy Park to the north and northeast. There are three originally separate stations here, which were combined sometime after unification of the subways in 1940. They now share a mezzanine, common entrance points, and unified signage. This complex was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. Information for riders at the 14 Street - Union Square Station. Photo taken prior to the discontinuation of the W in June 2010. 14th Street - Union Square, opened on September 5, 1917 is an express station on the BMT Broadway Line that has four tracks and two island platforms. N and R trains stop at the local tracks while Q trains stop at the express tracks. It is the southernmost station in Manhattan with a cross-platform interchange between all three Broadway services. A mosaic on the platform side walls is a depiction of "the junction of Broadway and the Bowery Road, 1828," as the area was once known. The mezzanine and crossover level has been reconstructed as well. Some former passageways and stairways have been closed off, including one immediately adjacent to the southernmost staircase on the northbound side. This

Report

Author: New York City Transit Authority
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 23,60 MB
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Mta Board Action Items

Author: New York (State). Metropolitan Transportation Authority
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 68,61 MB
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The Wheels That Drove New York

Author: Roger P. Roess
Editor: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3642304842
File Size: 15,17 MB
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The Wheels That Drove New York tells the fascinating story of how a public transportation system helped transform a small trading community on the southern tip of Manhattan island to a world financial capital that is home to more than 8,000,000 people. From the earliest days of horse-drawn conveyances to the wonders of one of the world's largest and most efficient subways, the story links the developing history of the City itself to the growth and development of its public transit system. Along the way, the key role of played by the inventors, builders, financiers, and managers of the system are highlighted. New York began as a fur trading outpost run by the Dutch West India Company, established after the discovery and exploration of New York Harbor and its great river by Henry Hudson. It was eventually taken over by the British, and the magnificent harbor provided for a growing center of trade. Trade spurred industry, initially those needed to support the shipping industry, later spreading to various products for export. When DeWitt Clinton built the Erie Canal, which linked New York Harbor to the Great Lakes, New York became the center of trade for all products moving into and out of the mid-west. As industry grew, New York became a magnate for immigrants seeking refuge in a new land of opportunity. The City's population continued to expand. Both water and land barriers, however, forced virtually the entire population to live south of what is now 14th Street. Densities grew dangerously, and brought both disease and conflict to the poorer quarters of the Five Towns. To expand, the City needed to conquer land and water barriers, primarily with a public transportation system. By the time of the Civil War, the City was at a breaking point. The horse-drawn public conveyances that had provided all of the public transportation services since the 1820's needed to be replaced with something more effective and efficient. First came the elevated railroads, initially powered by steam engines. With the invention of electricity and the electric traction motor, the elevated's were electrified, and a trolley system emerged. Finally, in 1904, the City opened its first subway. From there, the City's growth to northern Manhattan and to the "outer boroughs" of Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx exploded. The Wheels That Drove New York takes us through the present day, and discusses the many challenges that the transit system has had to face over the years. It also traces the conversion of the system from fully private operations (through the elevated railways) to the fully public system that exists today, and the problems that this transformation has created along the way.

Bulletin

Author: General Contractors Association
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 62,38 MB
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Trains

Author:
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File Size: 71,81 MB
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Proceedings Of The Board Of Transportation Of The City Of New York

Author: New York (N.Y.). Board of Transportation
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 31,95 MB
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Transit Record

Author: New York City Transit Authority
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 51,16 MB
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Moody S Manual Of Investments American And Foreign

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ISBN:
File Size: 37,63 MB
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Era Headlights

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File Size: 50,28 MB
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Proceedings

Author: New York (N.Y.) Board of Transportation
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 54,45 MB
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