Doctor Who The Eyeless

Author: Lance Parkin
Editor: Random House
ISBN: 1409072894
Size: 19,39 MB
Format: PDF
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At the heart of the ruined city of Arcopolis is the Fortress. It's a brutal structure placed here by one of the sides in a devastating intergalactic war that's long ended. Fifteen years ago, the entire population of the planet was killed in an instant by the weapon housed deep in the heart of the Fortress. Now only the ghosts remain. The Doctor arrives, and determines to fight his way past the Fortress's automatic defences and put the weapon beyond use. But he soon discovers he's not the only person in Arcopolis. What is the true nature of the weapon? Is the planet really haunted? Who are the Eyeless? And what will happen if they get to the weapon before the Doctor? The Doctor has a fight on his hands. And this time he's all on his own. Featuring the Tenth Doctor as played by David Tennant in the hit sci-fi series from BBC Television

Doctor Who And The Art Of Adaptation

Author: Marcus K. Harmes
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442232854
Size: 13,22 MB
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Although it started as a British television show with a small but devoted fan base, Doctor Who has grown in popularity and now appeals to audiences around the world. In the fifty-year history of the program, Doctor Who’s producers and scriptwriters have drawn on a dizzying array of literary sources and inspirations. Elements from Homer, classic literature, gothic horror, swashbucklers, Jacobean revenge tragedies, Orwellian dystopias, Westerns, and the novels of Agatha Christie and Evelyn Waugh have all been woven into the fabric of the series. One famous storyline from the mid-1970s was rooted in the Victoriana of authors like H. Rider Haggard and Arthur Conan Doyle, and another was a virtual remake of Anthony Hope’s The Prisoner of Zenda—with robots! In Doctor Who and the Art of Adaptation: Fifty Years of Storytelling, Marcus Harmes looks at the show’s frequent exploration of other sources to create memorable episodes. Harmes observes that adaptation in Doctor Who is not just a matter of transferring literary works to the screen, but of bringing a diversity of texts into dialogue with the established mythology of the series as well as with longstanding science fiction tropes. In this process, original stories are not just resituated, but transformed into new works. Harmes considers what this approach reveals about adaptation, television production, the art of storytelling, and the long-term success and cultural resonance enjoyed by Doctor Who. Doctor Who and the Art of Adaptation will be of interest to students of literature and television alike, and to scholars interested in adaptation studies. It will also appeal to fans of the series interested in tracing the deep cultural roots of television’s longest-running and most literate science-fiction adventure.

Religion And Doctor Who

Author: Andrew Crome
Editor: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1630874604
Size: 19,58 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Doctor Who has always contained a rich current of religious themes and ideas. In its very first episode it asked how humans rationalize the seemingly supernatural, as two snooping schoolteachers refused to accept that the TARDIS was real. More recently it has toyed with the mystery of Doctor's real name, perhaps an echo of ancient religions and rituals in which knowledge of the secret name of a god, angel or demon was thought to grant a mortal power over the entity. But why does Doctor Who intersect with religion so often, and what do such instances tell us about the society that produces the show and the viewers who engage with it? The writers of Religion and Doctor Who: Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith attempt to answer these questions through an in-depth analysis of the various treatments of religion throughout every era of the show's history. While the majority of chapters focus on the television show Doctor Who, the authors also look at audios, novels, and the response of fandom. Their analyses--all written in an accessible but academically thorough style--reveal that examining religion in a long-running series such as Doctor Who can contribute to a number of key debates within faith communities and religious history. Most importantly, it provides another way of looking at why Doctor Who continues to inspire, to engage, and to excite generations of passionate fans, whatever their position on faith. The contributors are drawn from the UK, the USA, and Australia, and their approaches are similarly diverse. Chapters have been written by film scholars and sociologists; theologians and historians; rhetoricians, philosophers and anthropologists. Some write from the perspective of a particular faith or belief; others write from the perspective of no religious belief. All, however, demonstrate a solid knowledge of and affection for the brilliance of Doctor Who.

More Magic Of The Minimum Dose

Author: Dr Dorothy Shepherd
Editor: Random House
ISBN: 1446490858
Size: 20,38 MB
Format: PDF
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Dr Dorothy Shepherd had wide experience both in Harley Street and in clinics in the poorer parts of London. Although she had leanings towards homoeopathy during her student years, it was not until she visited Dr J.T. Kent in the U.S.A., and experienced great benefit from this therapy that she fully adopted this method of treatment in her practice. Having embarked upon a career as a homoeopath she studied the subject deeply and the more she learned the more she became convinced that it is the finest method of dealing with every type of ailment. Being a true healer she believed that every sufferer should know of homoeopathy and in order to make it more widely known she began writing a much acclaimed series of books, the best known of which is Magic of the Minimum Dose and this book, More Magic of the Minimum Dose.

Doctor Who

Author: Paul Booth
Editor: Intellect Books
ISBN: 1783200200
Size: 17,50 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Since its premiere in November 1963, the classic British television program Doctor Who has been a cornerstone of popular culture for half a century. From the earliest “Exterminate!” to the recent “Allons-y!,” from the white-haired grandfather to the wide-grinned youth, the show has depicted the adventures of a time-traveling, dual-hearted, quick-witted, and multi-faced hero as he battles Daleks, Cybermen, Sontarans, and all manner of nasties. And, like its main character, who can regenerate his body and change his appearance, Doctor Who fandom has developed and changed significantly in the fifty years since its inception. In this engaging and insightful collection, fans and scholars from around the globe explore fan fiction, fan videos, and fan knitting, as well as the creation of new languages. As multifaceted as the character himself, Doctor Who fans come in many forms, and this book investigates thoroughly the multitude of fandoms, fan works, and fan discussions about this always-surprising and energetic program. Featuring full color images of fan work and discussions of both classic and New Who fandom, this book takes reader on a journey of discovery into one of the largest worldwide fan audiences that has ever existed. Thoughtful, insightful, and readable, this is one of only a few—and certainly one of the best—guides to Doctor Who fan culture and is certain to appeal to the show's many ardent fans across the globe.

Fan Phenomena Doctor Who

Author: Paul Booth
Editor: Intellect Books
ISBN: 1783201037
Size: 18,60 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Since its premiere in November 1963, the classic British television programme Doctor Who has been a cornerstone of popular culture for half a century. From the earliest ‘Exterminate!’ to the recent ‘Allons-y!,’ from the white-haired grandfather to the wide-grinned youth, the show has depicted the adventures of a time-travelling, dual-hearted, quick-witted and multi-faced hero as he battles Daleks, Cybermen, Sontarans and all manner of nasties. And, like its main character, who can regenerate his body and change his appearance, Doctor Who fandom has developed and changed significantly in the 50 years since its inception. In this engaging and insightful collection, fans and scholars from around the globe explore fan fiction, fan videos and fan knitting, as well as the creation of new languages. As multifaceted as the character himself, Doctor Who fans come in many forms, and this book investigates thoroughly the multitude of fandoms, fan works and fan discussions about this always-surprising and energetic programme. Featuring full-colour images of fan work and discussions of both classic and New Who fandom, this book takes the reader on a journey of discovery into one of the largest worldwide fan audiences that has ever existed. Thoughtful, insightful and readable, this is one of only a few - and certainly one of the best - guides to Doctor Who fan culture. It is certain to appeal to the show’s many ardent fans across the globe.

The Lost One

Author: Stephen D. Youngkin
Editor: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813137004
Size: 12,61 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Often typecast as a menacing figure, Peter Lorre achieved Hollywood fame first as a featured player and later as a character actor, trademarking his screen performances with a delicately strung balance between good and evil. His portrayal of the child murderer in Fritz Lang's masterpiece M (1931) catapulted him to international fame. Lang said of Lorre: "He gave one of the best performances in film history and certainly the best in his life." Today, the Hungarian-born actor is also recognized for his riveting performances in The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The Maltese Falcon (1941), and Casablanca (1942). Lorre arrived in America in 1934 expecting to shed his screen image as a villain. He even tried to lose his signature accent, but Hollywood repeatedly cast him as an outsider who hinted at things better left unknown. Seeking greater control over his career, Lorre established his own production company. His unofficial "graylisting" by the House Committee on Un-American Activities, however, left him with little work. He returned to Germany, where he co-authored, directed, and starred in the film Der Verlorene (The Lost One) in 1951. German audiences rejected Lorre's dark vision of their recent past, and the actor returned to America, wearily accepting roles that parodied his sinister movie personality.The first biography of this major actor, The Lost One: A Life of Peter Lorre draws upon more than three hundred interviews, including conversations with directors Fritz Lang, Alfred Hitchcock, Billy Wilder, John Huston, Frank Capra, and Rouben Mamoulian, who speak candidly about Lorre, both the man and the actor. Author Stephen D. Youngkin examines for the first time Lorre's pivotal relationship with German dramatist Bertolt Brecht, his experience as an émigré from Hitler's Germany, his battle with drug addiction, and his struggle with the choice between celebrity and intellectual respectability.Separating the enigmatic person from the persona long associated with one of classic Hollywood's most recognizable faces, The Lost One is the definitive account of a life triumphant and yet tragically riddled with many failed possibilities.

Who S 50

Author: Graeme Burk
Editor: ECW/ORIM
ISBN: 1770904751
Size: 12,40 MB
Format: PDF
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“Like being thrown the keys to the TARDIS with a temporal map to visit all those not-to-be-missed adventures in time and space” (Phil Ford, Doctor Who writer). Ever since its premiere on November 23, 1963, Doctor Who has been a television phenomenon. This companion guide presents the top fifty stories from the show’s first fifty years—examining every corner of the imaginative, humorous, and sometimes scary universe that has made Doctor Who an iconic part of popular culture. This must-have reference also includes behind the scenes details, goofs, trivia, connections to Doctor Who lore, and much more.

The Lost Civilizations Of The Stone Age

Author: Richard Rudgley
Editor: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0684862700
Size: 11,59 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A British scholar challenges the conventional view of the Stone Age as minimally civilized, pointing out the many advances of its peoples, from their maps of the constellations to their innovations in boat building.

The Banana Skin Love Magic

Author: Udo Nwabueze Agomoh
Editor: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1477140905
Size: 11,62 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Omanma was in love with Emeka. Suddenly, she was thrown into Chinedus hands by a banana skin. This was a turning point in the life of Omanma, as things began to take a dramatic and gradual change. Omanmas love had magically come to be through the hand of the banana skin. In the course of exploring her different roles in the book, we see several others who come into contact with her. Through Omanmas eyes, we see the full picture of her family and some of the societal happenings, such as Eze coronation, New Yam Festival, and several other exciting instances. Unfortunately, Omanmas real love did not mature early; she went through lots of experiences before she discovered herself and her true lover, Chinedu.