Edible French

Author: Clotilde Dusoulier
Editor: Penguin
ISBN: 0698157354
Size: 15,75 MB
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The idiosyncrasies of language can tell us a lot about a culture. In this delightful book, Clotilde Dusoulier, creator of the award-winning food blog Chocolate & Zucchini, delves into the history and meaning of fifty of the French language’s most popular food-related expressions. Accompanied by beautiful watercolor illustrations by artist Mélina Josserand, Edible French explores whimsical turns of phrase such as: Tomber dans les pommes (falling into the apples) = fainting Se faire rouler dans la farine (being rolled in flour) = being fooled Avoir un cœur d’artichaut (having the heart of an artichoke) = falling in love easily A treat of a read for Francophiles and food lovers alike, Edible French is the tastiest way to explore French culture—one that will leave you in high spirits—or, as the French say, vous donnera la pêche (give you the peach).

Edible French Garden

Author: Rosalind Creasy
Editor: Tuttle Publishing
ISBN: 1462917593
Size: 20,60 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Learn how to create a lovely French garden and then create delicious dishes with your produce using this easy-to-use French cookbook. In this sumptuous volume, the American master of edible landscaping looks at French vegetables and variations on the traditional French parterre garden, in which edibles are grown right along with flowers in formal settings. This book is a must-have for any gardener interested in the flavors of France. The "Resources" section gives you sources for all you'll need to put in your own French garden. Along with a fascinating history and tour of French gardens, Creasy introduces "cut-and-come-again and other harvesting methods used in France. Along with French gardening techniques the many featured recipes include: Roasted Garlic Spread Cream of Carrot Top Soup Leek and Potato Soup with Sorrel Leeks in Vinaigrette Asparagus with Hollandaise SauceBraised Lettuce with Lemon Thyme And many more!

Crafting The Culture And History Of French Chocolate

Author: Susan J. Terrio
Editor: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520221265
Size: 14,66 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book on the crafting of chocolate in contemporary France is itself delicious. It will be a classic of French ethnography and contribute in important ways to the ongoing debate about the role of national identity in the European Union."—Carole L. Crumley, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill "A real pathbreaker. The intensity of Terrio's engagement with her respondents shines from almost every page. The work contributes to our understanding of the politics of heritage. . . . It is a thoroughly researched and descriptively rich analysis of how anthropologists can approach weighty problems of identity, national-local relations, and the ideology of self and other."—Michael Herzfeld, author of Portrait of a Greek Imagination

In A French Kitchen

Author: Susan Herrmann Loomis
Editor: Penguin
ISBN: 0698191080
Size: 16,78 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A delightful celebration of French life and the cooks who turn even the simplest meals into an occasion Even before Susan Herrmann Loomis wrote her now-classic memoir, On Rue Tatin, American readers have been compelled by books about the French’s ease with cooking. With In a French Kitchen, Loomis—an expat who long ago traded her American grocery store for a bustling French farmer’s market—demystifies in lively prose the seemingly effortless je ne sais quoi behind a simple French meal. One by one, readers are invited to meet the busy people of Louviers and surrounding villages and towns of Loomis’s adopted home, from runway-chic Edith, who has zero passion for cooking—but a love of food that inspires her to whip up an array of mouthwatering dishes—to Nathalie, who becomes misty-eyed as she talks about her mother’s Breton cooking, then goes on to reproduce it. Through friends and neighbors like these, Loomis learns that delicious, even decadent meals don’t have to be complicated. Are French cooks better organized when planning and shopping? Do they have a greater ability to improvise with whatever they have on hand when unexpected guests arrive? The answer to both is: Yes. But they also have an innate understanding of food and cooking, are instinctively knowledgeable about seasonal produce, and understand what combination of simple ingredients will bring out the best of their gardens or local markets. Thankfully for American readers, In a French Kitchen shares the everyday French tips, secrets, and eighty-five recipes that allow them to turn every meal into a sumptuous occasion.

Edible Identities Food As Cultural Heritage

Author: Dr Michael A Di Giovine
Editor: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409442632
Size: 14,52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Bringing together cultural anthropologists, archaeologists, historians and other scholars of food and heritage, this volume closely examines the ways in which the cultivation, preparation, and consumption of food is used to create identity claims of 'cultural heritage' on local, regional, national and international scales. Featuring case studies from Europe, Asia and the Americas, this timely volume also addresses the complex processes of classifying, designating, and valorizing food as 'terroir,' 'slow food,' or as intangible cultural heritage through UNESCO. By effectively analyzing food and foodways through the perspectives of critical heritage studies, this collection productively brings two overlapping but frequently separate theoretical frameworks into conversation.

United States Imports Of Merchandise For Consumption

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 11,47 MB
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Edible Medicinal And Non Medicinal Plants

Author: Lim T. K.
Editor: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400717636
Size: 18,50 MB
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This book continues as volume 2 of a multi-compendium on Edible Medicinal and Non-Medicinal Plants. It covers edible fruits/seeds used fresh or processed, as vegetables, spices, stimulants, pulses, edible oils and beverages. It encompasses species from the following families: Clusiaceae, Combretaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Dilleniaceae, Ebenaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Ericaceae and Fabaceae. This work will be of significant interest to scientists, researchers, medical practitioners, pharmacologists, ethnobotanists, horticulturists, food nutritionists, agriculturists, botanists, herbalogists, conservationists, teachers, lecturers, students and the general public. Topics covered include: taxonomy (botanical name and synonyms); common English and vernacular names; origin and distribution; agro-ecological requirements; edible plant part and uses; botany; nutritive and medicinal/pharmacological properties, medicinal uses and current research findings; non-edible uses; and selected/cited references.

Chambers Concise Dictionary

Author:
Editor: Allied Publishers
ISBN:
Size: 17,67 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Edible Memory

Author: Jennifer A. Jordan
Editor: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022622824X
Size: 17,30 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Each week during the growing season, farmers’ markets offer up such delicious treasures as brandywine tomatoes, cosmic purple carrots, pink pearl apples, and chioggia beets—varieties of fruits and vegetables that are prized by home chefs and carefully stewarded by farmers from year to year. These are the heirlooms and the antiques of the food world, endowed with their own rich histories. While cooking techniques and flavor fads have changed from generation to generation, a Ribston Pippin apple today can taste just as flavorful as it did in the eighteenth century. But how does an apple become an antique and a tomato an heirloom? In Edible Memory, Jennifer A. Jordan examines the ways that people around the world have sought to identify and preserve old-fashioned varieties of produce. In doing so, Jordan shows that these fruits and vegetables offer a powerful emotional and physical connection to a shared genetic, cultural, and culinary past. Jordan begins with the heirloom tomato, inquiring into its botanical origins in South America and its culinary beginnings in Aztec cooking to show how the homely and homegrown tomato has since grown to be an object of wealth and taste, as well as a popular symbol of the farm-to-table and heritage foods movements. She shows how a shift in the 1940s away from open pollination resulted in a narrow range of hybrid tomato crops. But memory and the pursuit of flavor led to intense seed-saving efforts increasing in the 1970s, as local produce and seeds began to be recognized as living windows to the past. In the chapters that follow, Jordan combines lush description and thorough research as she investigates the long history of antique apples; changing tastes in turnips and related foods like kale and parsnips; the movement of vegetables and fruits around the globe in the wake of Columbus; and the poignant, perishable world of stone fruits and tropical fruit, in order to reveal the connections—the edible memories—these heirlooms offer for farmers, gardeners, chefs, diners, and home cooks. This deep culinary connection to the past influences not only the foods we grow and consume, but the ways we shape and imagine our farms, gardens, and local landscapes. From the farmers’ market to the seed bank to the neighborhood bistro, these foods offer essential keys not only to our past but also to the future of agriculture, the environment, and taste. By cultivating these edible memories, Jordan reveals, we can stay connected to a delicious heritage of historic flavors, and to the pleasures and possibilities for generations of feasts to come.

The Edible Tao

Author: Ruth Pennington Paget
Editor: iUniverse
ISBN: 0595291376
Size: 19,97 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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My sister worked as a waitress at the Ho-Ho Inn, a Chinese restaurant, on Cass Street in Detroit. She sat a plate of Egg Foo Yung in front of five-year-old me. I had a way with words and quickly renamed this Egg Foo "Yuck." Tears ran down my cheeks as I thought about eating this worm-like mess of food. The Chinese waiter called George came in and looked at me. They took the Egg Foo "Yuck" and threw it in the garbage, then he went to the freezer and got me one of those ice cream treats that Chinese restaurants serve; a coconut flavored outer shell of ice cream surrounding a mango core. My sister came in and glared at me. George said, "She ate everything, so I gave her an ice cream." I smiled sweetly at George. My love for the Chinese, if not their food, began at that instant. --"The Edible Tao"