Citizen Customer Partner

Author: John Clayton Thomas
Editor: M.E. Sharpe
ISBN: 9780765627216
File Size: 65,75 MB
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For almost a half a century, scholars and practitioners have debated what the connections should be between public administration and the public. Does the public serve principally as citizen-owners, those to whom administrators are responsible? Are members of the public more appropriately viewed as the customers of government? Or, in an increasingly networked world, do they serve more as the partners of public administrators in the production of public services? This book starts from the premise that the public comes to government not principally in one role but in all three roles, as citizens and customers and partners. The purpose of the book is to address the dual challenge that reality implies: (1) to help public administrators and other public officials to understand the complex nature of the public they face, and (2) to provide recommendations for how public administrators can most effectively interact with the public in the different roles. Using this comprehensive perspective, Citizen, Customer, Partner helps students, practitioners, and scholars understand when and how the public should be integrated into the practice of public administration. Most chapters in Citizen, Customer, Partner include multiple boxed cases that illustrate the chapter's content with real-world examples. The book concludes with an extremely useful Appendix that collects and summarizes the 40 Design Principles - specific advice for public organizations on working with the public as customers, partners, and citizens.
Citizen, Customer, Partner: Engaging the Public in Public Management
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: John Clayton Thomas
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-12-18 - Publisher: Routledge

For almost a half a century, scholars and practitioners have debated what the connections should be between public administration and the public. Does the public serve principally as citizen-owners, those to whom administrators are responsible? Are members of the public more appropriately viewed as the customers of government? Or, in
Engaging the Public with Climate Change
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: Lorraine Whitmarsh, Irene Lorenzoni, Saffron O'Neill
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-06-25 - Publisher: Routledge

Despite increasing public awareness of climate change, our behaviours relating to consumption and energy use remain largely unchanged. This book answers the urgent call for effective engagement methods to foster sustainable lifestyles, community action, and social change. Written by practitioners and academics, the chapters combine theoretical perspectives with case studies
Citizen, Customer, Partner: Engaging the Public in Public Management
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: John Clayton Thomas
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-07-28 - Publisher: Routledge

First Published in 2017. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.
Empowering Citizens, Engaging the Public
Language: en
Pages: 199
Authors: Rainer Eisfeld
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-02-12 - Publisher: Springer

This book is the first comprehensive study to respond to the ongoing debates on political sciences’ fragmentation, doubtful relevance, and disconnect with the larger public. It explores the implications of the argument that political science ought to become more topic-driven, more relevant and more comprehensible for "lay" audiences. Consequences would
Citizen, Customer, Partner
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: John Clayton Thomas
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012 - Publisher: M.E. Sharpe

For almost a half a century, scholars and practitioners have debated what the connections should be between public administration and the public. Does the public serve principally as citizen-owners, those to whom administrators are responsible? Are members of the public more appropriately viewed as the customers of government? Or, in