Fighting Traffic

Author: Peter D. Norton
Editor: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262516128
File Size: 70,85 MB
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The fight for the future of the city street between pedestrians, street railways, and promoters of the automobile between 1915 and 1930. Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverse and included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets were primarily a motor thoroughfares where children did not belong and where pedestrians were condemned as “jaywalkers.” In Fighting Traffic, Peter Norton argues that to accommodate automobiles, the American city required not only a physical change but also a social one: before the city could be reconstructed for the sake of motorists, its streets had to be socially reconstructed as places where motorists belonged. It was not an evolution, he writes, but a bloody and sometimes violent revolution. Norton describes how street users struggled to define and redefine what streets were for. He examines developments in the crucial transitional years from the 1910s to the 1930s, uncovering a broad anti-automobile campaign that reviled motorists as “road hogs” or “speed demons” and cars as “juggernauts” or “death cars.” He considers the perspectives of all users—pedestrians, police (who had to become “traffic cops”), street railways, downtown businesses, traffic engineers (who often saw cars as the problem, not the solution), and automobile promoters. He finds that pedestrians and parents campaigned in moral terms, fighting for “justice.” Cities and downtown businesses tried to regulate traffic in the name of “efficiency.” Automotive interest groups, meanwhile, legitimized their claim to the streets by invoking “freedom”—a rhetorical stance of particular power in the United States. Fighting Traffic offers a new look at both the origins of the automotive city in America and how social groups shape technological change.
Fighting Traffic
Language: en
Pages: 408
Authors: Peter D. Norton
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-01-21 - Publisher: MIT Press

The fight for the future of the city street between pedestrians, street railways, and promoters of the automobile between 1915 and 1930. Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverse and included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets were primarily a
Fighting Traffic
Language: en
Pages: 408
Authors: Peter D. Norton
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-01-21 - Publisher: MIT Press

The fight for the future of the city street between pedestrians, street railways, and promoters of the automobile between 1915 and 1930. Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverse and included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets were primarily a
Collaboration in Fighting Traffic Congestion
Language: en
Pages: 62
Authors: Peter D. Norton
Categories: Traffic congestion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher:

The Twin Cities metropolitan area was selected to participate in a federal transportation initiative called the Urban Partnership program. This required the formation of a multi-agency collaboration of transportation-focused groups in the Twin Cities area. This collaboration - including the external forces affecting it, the internal processes, structures, and competencies
No Accident
Language: en
Pages: 300
Authors: Neil Arason
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-04-29 - Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

It is possible to eliminate death and serious injury from Canada’s roads. In other jurisdictions, the European Union, centres in the United States, and at least one automotive company aim to achieve comparable results as early as 2020. In Canada, though, citizens must turn their thinking on its head and
Car Country
Language: en
Pages: 464
Authors: Christopher W. Wells
Categories: Transportation
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-05-15 - Publisher: University of Washington Press

For most people in the United States, going almost anywhere begins with reaching for the car keys. This is true, Christopher Wells argues, because the United States is Car Country�a nation dominated by landscapes that are difficult, inconvenient, and often unsafe to navigate by those who are not sitting behind