Flipped Assessment

Author: Marika Toivola
Editor:
ISBN: 9789513775155
File Size: 24,75 MB
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New release on the significance of assessment in a student-centered learning culture Flipped Assessment presents formative assessment as the most important factor in a student-centered learning culture. The book is built on practical experience and strong theoretical foundations. The story of the author developing her assessment practices offers guidance for readers who want to develop their own assessment practices and learning culture. The book also describes how assessment is used to support the students' self-regulation and to help them to reach their own, individual goals. At its best, assessment supports the learning of the whole community.

Implementation And Critical Assessment Of The Flipped Classroom Experience

Author: Scheg, Abigail G.
Editor: IGI Global
ISBN: 1466674652
File Size: 76,87 MB
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In the past decade, traditional classroom teaching models have been transformed in order to better promote active learning and learner engagement. Implementation and Critical Assessment of the Flipped Classroom Experience seeks to capture the momentum of non-traditional teaching methods and provide a necessary resource for individuals who are interested in taking advantage of this pedagogical endeavor. Using narrative explanations and foundation materials provided by experienced instructors, this premier reference work presents the benefits and challenges of flipped methodology implementation in today’s classroom to educators and educational administrators across all disciplines and levels.

Innovative Trends In Flipped Teaching And Adaptive Learning

Author: Sein-Echaluce, María Luisa
Editor: IGI Global
ISBN: 152258143X
File Size: 64,45 MB
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Understanding new educational innovations is essential for the improvement of the training and learning process. In order to effectively implement these new tools in the classroom, teachers and trainers need access to real-life cases in which these methods were successfully used. Innovative Trends in Flipped Teaching and Adaptive Learning is a critical scholarly resource that examines current advances in educational innovation and presents cases that allow for the improvement of personalized and active learning. Featuring a wide range of topics such as higher education, teacher education, and learning strategies, this book is ideal for educators, instructional designers, academicians, researchers, and students.

Leadership Of Higher Education Assessment

Author: Matthew B. Fuller
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1351180983
File Size: 65,50 MB
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Leadership of Higher Education Assessment provides a comprehensive treatment of leadership theories and helps practitioners integrate this knowledge into their assessment work. Synthesizing leadership theories into manageable concepts relevant to the college and university context, this useful guide supports assessment leaders in addressing complex institutional situations and developing their own unique philosophy of assessment and leadership style. In the face of ongoing challenges such as data accessibility, data security concerns, a shifting accreditation environment, complex politics, and lack of available resources, this book is a critical guide for assessment leaders who want to take command of their practice.

Assessment In Open Distance And E Learning

Author: Jessica Evans
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 0429780230
File Size: 53,71 MB
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Universities across the globe are attempting to change assessment practices to address challenges in student engagement and achievement and to respond to a global employability agenda demanding evidence of a broader range of skills and competencies. In the UK this has acquired urgency given the shift of higher education over the last 20 years from the prerogative of an elite minority to mass participation in a highly diversified market system. Integral to this interrogation of objectives for assessment is the identified need to develop and improve academics’ assessment practice. Strategies frequently focus on attendance at formal Continuous Professional Development events and/or implementation of institutional blueprints. This book showcases how scholarship as part of academics’ practice can be part of an academic toolkit for change that expands awareness and knowledge of the purposes and effects of the pedagogy of assessment. The case studies – ranging from assessment in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), to assessment design for students whose first language is not English, to the effectiveness of peer learning to support academic integrity and programme-level assessment strategies – are framed by an introduction that explores a ‘communities of practice’ approach to the institution-wide improvement of assessment. It argues – through a case study from The Open University (OU) – that academics’ professional expertise is best deepened through participation in authentic activities of teaching and scholarship. The discussion identifies what is involved in such an approach including the role of an enabling principles-based framework, the constraints on implementation, and the implications for leaders of teaching and learning. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Open Learning journal.

The Flipped Classroom

Author: Carl Reidsema
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 9811034133
File Size: 56,28 MB
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Teaching and learning within higher education continues to evolve with innovative and new practices such as flipped teaching. This book contributes to the literature by developing a much deeper understanding of the complex phenomenon of flipped classroom approaches within higher education. It also serves as a practical guide to implementing flipped classroom teaching in academic practice across different higher educational institutions and disciplines. Part 1 of this book (Practice) describes the considerations involved in flipped classroom teaching, including the challenges faced in transforming teaching and learning within higher education. Further, it reviews the educational concepts on which the flipped classroom is based, including a selected history of similar innovations in the past. The final sections of Part 1 explore the tools needed for flipping, the design steps, assessment methods and the role of reflective practice within flipped teaching environments. “p>Part 2 of the book (Practices) provides a range of case studies from higher educational institutions in different countries and disciplines to demonstrate the many shapes and sizes of flipped classrooms. Many of the challenges, such as engaging students in their own learning and shifting them from spectators in the learning process to active participants, prove to be universal.

Innovations In Flipping The Language Classroom

Author: Jeffrey Mehring
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 9811069689
File Size: 10,62 MB
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This book provides advice on flipping from a vast range of topics related to second and foreign language teaching, such as assessment, pronunciation, speaking, listening, reading, writing, and content-based language teaching. Based on insights from other professionals in the field, it helps teachers of English as a foreign language better understand the idea of a flipped classroom. The book provides examples for teachers who wish to start flipping their own classes and additional ideas for those who are already flipping.

Promoting Active Learning Through The Flipped Classroom Model

Author: Keengwe, Jared
Editor: IGI Global
ISBN: 1466649887
File Size: 76,66 MB
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"This book focuses on an in-depth assessment on strategies and instructional design practices appropriate for the flipped classroom model, highlighting the benefits, shortcoming, perceptions, and academic results of the flipped classroom model"--Provided by publisher.

Flipping Academic English Language Learning

Author: Erik Voss
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 9811386579
File Size: 71,61 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book draws on theory, research, and practice-oriented literature to offer an introduction to flipped learning and offer busy instructors advice on how to flip their academic English language courses. The chapters balance theoretical foundations, practical applications, and useful resources for developing materials. The first half of this book defines flipped learning and academic English, describes how it supports English language learning, and explains the role of technology, as well as issues with accountability and feedback. The second half of the book then makes connections between the theoretical issues presented in the first three chapters and the practical applications in the following chapters, which provide lesson descriptions and assessment ideas for language learning contexts with or without access to technology. The book concludes with a list of tools and technologies for developing materials and activities, as well as additional resources for professional development and further exploration of flipped English language learning.

Investigations 2001 Assessment Sourcebook Grade 3

Author:
Editor: Pearson Scott Foresman
ISBN: 9780201375879
File Size: 36,30 MB
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Sourcebook contains End-of-the-Unit Assessment Tasks for each Curriculum Unit along with suggestions of what the teacher should look for when evaluating student work.* Contains both English and Spanish blackline masters.

Flips Turns And Area

Author:
Editor:
ISBN: 9780201378238
File Size: 66,27 MB
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Flipped By Design

Author: Jacob Bane
Editor: The Ohio State University
ISBN:
File Size: 12,36 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The “Flipped Classroom” model of instruction has generated discussion around the world of education. Numerous articles have been written documenting experiences surrounding this method of teaching. The one piece that has been missing from this discussion is a sound framework to design a “Flipped” course using proven design principles. Instructional Design provides a proven framework to design all types of instruction and these principles can be used to design a “Flipped” course. This book introduces the “Flipped Classroom” model of instruction and Instructional Design framework. Using this background, a method to “Flip” a course using sound Instructional Design principles is outlined. This book is the textbook for the iTunes U Course, Flipped Through Design. This book contains all of the course content, however the course provides activities to guide the design process of “Flipping” a course using Instructional Design.

The Assessment Of Alphabetizing Strategies For Phone Book Usage By Normal Adults Normal Children And Educable Mentally Retarded Children

Author: Marian Mindel
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 21,77 MB
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Best Practices For Flipping The College Classroom

Author: Julee B. Waldrop
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317693795
File Size: 28,20 MB
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Best Practices for Flipping the College Classroom provides a comprehensive overview and systematic assessment of the flipped classroom methodology in higher education. The book: Reviews various pedagogical theories that inform flipped classroom practice and provides a brief history from its inception in K–12 to its implementation in higher education. Offers well-developed and instructive case studies chronicling the implementation of flipped strategies across a broad spectrum of academic disciplines, physical environments, and student populations. Provides insights and suggestions to instructors in higher education for the implementation of flipped strategies in their own courses by offering reflections on learning outcomes and student success in flipped classrooms compared with those employing more traditional models and by describing relevant technologies. Discusses observations and analyses of student perceptions of flipping the classroom as well as student practices and behaviors particular to flipped classroom models. Illuminates several research models and approaches for use and modification by teacher-scholars interested in building on this research on their own campuses. The evidence presented on the flipped classroom methodology by its supporters and detractors at all levels has thus far been almost entirely anecdotal or otherwise unreliable. Best Practices for Flipping the College Classroom is the first book to provide faculty members nuanced qualitative and quantitative evidence that both supports and challenges the value of flipping the college classroom.

People In Crisis

Author: Lee Ann Hoff
Editor: Addison-Wesley
ISBN:
File Size: 34,15 MB
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Guidelines For Assessment And Instruction In Statistics Education Gaise Report

Author: Christine A. Franklin
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 32,30 MB
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Statistics education as proposed in this framework can promote the must-have competencies for graduates to thrive in the modern world.

The Flipped Mathematics Classroom

Author: Heather Ramaglia
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 41,71 MB
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This study addresses how the flipped method of classroom instruction differs from traditional classroom instruction when comparing student achievement measures in middle and high school mathematics classrooms. The flipped classroom is defined by the Flipped Learning Network (2014) as an instructional method that moves direct instruction outside of the classroom in order to make room in the classroom for a more interactive learning environment where students can actively engage in the content. The flipped classroom strategy theoretically allows teachers the time to develop mathematical ideas and the ability to facilitate that development. For the Common Core State Standards initiative to be effective, teachers need to engage students in new learning experiences that support college and career readiness. By implementing a technology based instructional approach, like the flipped classroom strategy, teachers are able to blend twenty-first century skills with the development of the essential habits of mind of mathematically proficient students (Brunsell & Horejsi, 2013). This study seeks to understand how the flipped method of classroom instruction can lead to improved student achievement in mathematics courses and improve student perceptions about math in order to encourage course consumption in the future (Zollman, 2011). A modified explanatory sequential mixed methods design was used, and it involved collecting quantitative data and then explaining the quantitative results with in-depth qualitative data. In the quantitative phases of the study, NWEA Mathematics MAP Assessment data were collected from middle school students and course common final assessment scores were collected from middle school and high school students in a large Midwestern suburban school district to determine how student math achievement was impacted for students in a flipped classroom as compared to a traditionally instructed classroom. The frequency of active learning incidents was also collected during classroom observations. The qualitative phase was conducted as a follow up to the quantitative results to help explain the quantitative results. In this exploratory follow-up, student and teacher perceptions of mathematics achievement as a result of the flipped classroom approach to instruction with middle and high school math students and how those perceptions might be different than those of students and teachers in traditionally taught classrooms along with descriptions of observable active learning incidents in the school district were explored.

Critical Care Assessment Handbook

Author: Sharron E. Murray
Editor: Saunders
ISBN:
File Size: 54,37 MB
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This portable, practical handbook provides the comprehensive knowledge base you need to thoroughly and accurately assess critically ill patients - both inside and outside of the ICU. It explains how, when, and why to use various assessment approaches based on each individual patient's situation.

Mathematics Assessment Sampler Prekindergarten Grade 2

Author: DeAnn Huinker
Editor: National Council of Teachers of English
ISBN:
File Size: 25,16 MB
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This sampler presents assessment tasks that are appropriate for use with students from age 4 to age 8. The book provides teachers of primary grades mathematics with examples of assessment tasks that reflect the various ways assessments can be used prior to, during and following mathematics instruction. Teachers can then consider the potential of these tasks to uncover the mathematical understandings of their students for the purpose of planning further instruction. Each task can be altered by changing the context, breaking the task into subparts, limiting the scope or complexity of the task, or extending the task to provide more of a challenge or enhance the depth of understanding being assessed.

Rethinking Rubrics In Writing Assessment

Author: Maja Wilson
Editor: Heinemann
ISBN:
File Size: 19,88 MB
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The book you're about to read is not only a superb analysis of rubrics but a lesson in how to apply careful thinking to classroom practice. -Alfie Kohn, Author of The Case Against Standardized Testing This book will create the conversations educators desperately need-about accurate assessment, quality in writing, and informed teaching. -Randy Bomer, Author of For a Better World The conventional wisdom in English education is that rubrics are the best and easiest tools for assessment. But sometimes it's better to be unconventional. In Rethinking Rubrics in Writing Assessment, Maja Wilson offers a new perspective on rubrics and argues for a better, more responsive way to think about assessing writers' progress. Though you may sense a disconnect between student-centered teaching and rubric-based assessment, you may still use rubrics for convenience or for want of better alternatives. Rethinking Rubrics in Writing Assessment gives you the impetus to make a change, demonstrating how rubrics can hurt kids and replace professional decision making with an inauthentic pigeonholing that stamps standardization onto a notably nonstandard process. With an emphasis on thoughtful planning and teaching, Wilson shows you how to reconsider writing assessment so that it aligns more closely with high-quality instruction and avoids the potentially damaging effects of rubrics. Stop listening to the conventional wisdom, and turn instead to a compelling new voice to find out why rubrics are often replaceable. Open Rethinking Rubrics in Writing Assessment and let Maja Wilson start you down the path to more sensitive, authentic style of writing assessment.