Flood Insurance Study

Author: United States. Federal Insurance Administration
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 16,96 MB
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Oversight On Federal Flood Insurance Program

Author: United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. Subcommittee on Housing and Urban Affairs
Editor:
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File Size: 13,36 MB
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Flood Insurance Study

Author: United States. Federal Insurance Administration
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 20,63 MB
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Flood Insurance Study

Author:
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ISBN:
File Size: 21,19 MB
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Answers To Questions About The National Flood Insurance Program

Author: Barry Leonard
Editor: DIANE Publishing
ISBN: 9780788176081
File Size: 26,79 MB
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Intended to acquaint the public with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). It is designed for readers who do not need a detailed history or refined technical or legal explanations, but do need a basic understanding of the program & the answers to some frequently asked questions. Includes: introduction to the NFIP; flood insurance information for prospective buyers; coverage; filing a flood insurance claim; floodplain management requirements; flood hazard assessments & mapping requirements; NFIP address & phone directory; list of available publications; & address for obtaining CRS coordinator's manual.

National Flood Insurance Program Community Status Book

Author:
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File Size: 71,54 MB
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Levees And The National Flood Insurance Program

Author: National Research Council
Editor: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309282934
File Size: 33,62 MB
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The Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration (FIMA) manages the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which is a cornerstone in the U.S. strategy to assist communities to prepare for, mitigate against, and recover from flood disasters. The NFIP was established by Congress with passage of the National Flood Insurance Act in 1968, to help reduce future flood damages through NFIP community floodplain regulation that would control development in flood hazard areas, provide insurance for a premium to property owners, and reduce federal expenditures for disaster assistance. The flood insurance is available only to owners of insurable property located in communities that participate in the NFIP. Currently, the program has 5,555,915 million policies in 21,881 communities3 across the United States. The NFIP defines the one percent annual chance flood (100-year or base flood) floodplain as a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). The SFHA is delineated on FEMA's Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM's) using topographic, meteorologic, hydrologic, and hydraulic information. Property owners with a federally back mortgage within the SFHAs are required to purchase and retain flood insurance, called the mandatory flood insurance purchase requirement (MPR). Levees and floodwalls, hereafter referred to as levees, have been part of flood management in the United States since the late 1700's because they are relatively easy to build and a reasonable infrastructure investment. A levee is a man-made structure, usually an earthen embankment, designed and constructed in accordance with sound engineering practices to contain, control, or divert the flow of water so as to provide protection from temporary flooding. A levee system is a flood protection system which consists of a levee, or levees, and associated structures, such as closure and drainage devices, which are constructed and operated in accordance with sound engineering practices. Recognizing the need for improving the NFIP's treatment of levees, FEMA officials approached the National Research Council's (NRC) Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB) and requested this study. The NRC responded by forming the ad hoc Committee on Levee and the National Flood Insurance Program: Improving Policies and Practices, charged to examine current FEMA treatment of levees within the NFIP and provide advice on how those levee-elated policies and activities could be improved. The study addressed four broad areas, risk analysis, flood insurance, risk reduction, and risk communication, regarding how levees are considered in the NFIP. Specific issues within these areas include current risk analysis and mapping procedures behind accredited and non-accredited levees, flood insurance pricing and the mandatory flood insurance purchase requirement, mitigation options to reduce risk for communities with levees, flood risk communication efforts, and the concept of shared responsibility. The principal conclusions and recommendations are highlighted in this report.

Flood Insurance Study Mecklenburg County North Carolina And Volume 3 Of 5 Flood Insurance Study Number 37119cv003a Federal Emerg

Author:
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File Size: 20,21 MB
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The Status Of The National Flood Insurance Program

Author: United States
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 23,10 MB
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Affordability Of National Flood Insurance Program Premiums

Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Editor: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309380804
File Size: 65,40 MB
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When Congress authorized the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) in 1968, it intended for the program to encourage community initiatives in flood risk management, charge insurance premiums consistent with actuarial pricing principles, and encourage the purchase of flood insurance by owners of flood prone properties, in part, by offering affordable premiums. The NFIP has been reauthorized many times since 1968, most recently with the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012 (BW 2012). In this most recent reauthorization, Congress placed a particular emphasis on setting flood insurance premiums following actuarial pricing principles, which was motivated by a desire to ensure future revenues were adequate to pay claims and administrative expenses. BW 2012 was designed to move the NFIP towards risk-based premiums for all flood insurance policies. The result was to be increased premiums for some policyholders that had been paying less than NFIP risk-based premiums and to possibly increase premiums for all policyholders. Recognition of this possibility and concern for the affordability of flood insurance is reflected in sections of the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 2014 (HFIAA 2014). These sections called on FEMA to propose a draft affordability framework for the NFIP after completing an analysis of the efforts of possible programs for offering "means-tested assistance" to policyholders for whom higher rates may not be affordable. BW 2012 and HFIAA 2014 mandated that FEMA conduct a study, in cooperation with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, which would compare the costs of a program of risk-based rates and means-tested assistance to the current system of subsidized flood insurance rates and federally funded disaster relief for people without coverage. Production of two reports was agreed upon to fulfill this mandate. This second report proposes alternative approaches for a national evaluation of affordability program policy options and includes lessons for the design of a national study from a proof-of-concept pilot study.

National Flood Insurance Act Of 1968 As Amended

Author:
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ISBN:
File Size: 76,63 MB
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Flood Insurance Manual

Author: U. s. Department of Homeland Security
Editor: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781492825067
File Size: 34,90 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) was established by the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The Act was in response to Congress finding that: • Flooding disasters required unforeseen disaster relief and placed an increased burden on the nation's resources. • The installation of flood preventive and protective measures and other public programs designed to reduce losses caused by flood damage had not been sufficient to adequately protect against the growing exposure to flood losses as a matter of national policy. A reasonable method of slowing the risk of flood losses would be through a program of flood insurance that could complement and encourage preventive and protective measures. • Many factors made it uneconomical for private insurance industry carriers to make flood insurance available to those in need of such protection on reasonable terms and conditions. • A program of flood insurance with large-scale participation of the Federal Government and the maximum extent practicable by the private industry was feasible and could be initiated. Congress stated that the purpose in passing the Act was to: • Authorize a flood insurance program that, over time, could be made available across the country through the cooperative effort of the Federal Government and the private insurance industry. • Provide flexibility in the program so that such flood insurance would be based on workable methods of pooling risks, minimizing costs, and distributing burdens equitably among the general public and those who would be protected by flood insurance. • Encourage state and local governments to use wisely the lands under their jurisdiction by considering the hazards of flood when rendering decisions on the future use of such land in order to minimize damage. From 1968 until 1979, the NFIP was administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. When the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) was established in 1979, administration of the NFIP was transferred to that agency. In March 2003, FEMA became part of the newly created U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The NFIP is a program in which communities formally agree, as evidenced by their adoption of codes and ordinances, to regulate the use of their floodprone lands. In return, FEMA makes flood insurance coverage available on buildings and their contents throughout the community. FEMA has traditionally identified these flood hazard areas on maps that are provided to communities for carrying out their responsibilities. The maps are also used by insurance agents/ producers to determine rates and by lenders to determine purchase requirements.

A Case Study Of Some Economic Aspects Of The National Flood Insurance Program

Author: Leo R. Cheatham
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 58,49 MB
Format: PDF
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Assessment Of The Impacts Of The National Flood Insurance Program On Highways

Author: George Davis
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 16,16 MB
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Flood Insurance Summary July September 1978

Author: William L. Trakimas
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 65,31 MB
Format: PDF
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Changes In Flood Insurance In The Susquehanna River Basin 1978 1982

Author: Stewart K. Wright
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 58,51 MB
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The National Flood Insurance Program Revisited

Author: Frank Edward Maloney
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 15,55 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 1975
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Sodowski V National Flood Insurance Program Of The Federal Emergency Management Agency

Author:
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ISBN:
File Size: 39,26 MB
Format: PDF
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The Lender Placed Flood Insurance Market For Residential Properties

Author: Lloyd S. Dixon
Editor: Rand Corporation
ISBN: 083304155X
File Size: 47,37 MB
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The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides the majority of flood insurance on U.S. residential properties. While insurance agents sell nearly all NFIP policies through private insurance companies, the U.S. government still underwrites them. Flood insurance is also available from private insurers that underwrite it themselves. This report provides information about the size of the private market and compares private with NFIP policies.