For Indigenous Eyes Only

Author: School of American Research (Santa Fe, N.M.)
Editor: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN:
File Size: 77,82 MB
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Recognizing an urgent need for Indigenous liberation strategies, Indigenous intellectuals met to create a book with hands-on suggestions and activities to enable Indigenous communities to decolonize themselves. The authors begin with the belief that Indigenous Peoples have the power, strength, and intelligence to develop culturally specific decolonization strategies for their own communities and thereby systematically pursue their own liberation. These scholars and writers demystify the language of colonization and decolonization to help Indigenous communities identify useful concepts, terms, and intellectual frameworks in their struggles toward liberation and self-determination. This handbook covers a wide range of topics, including Indigenous governance, education, language, oral tradition, repatriation, images and stereotypes, and truth-telling. It aims to facilitate critical thinking while offering recommendations for fostering community discussions and plans for meaningful community action.

For Indigenous Minds Only

Author: Michael Yellow Bird
Editor: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: 9781934691939
File Size: 62,32 MB
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Multicultural And Ethnic Children S Literature In The United States

Author: Donna L. Gilton
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 1538138417
File Size: 65,98 MB
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"This second edition of Multicultural and Ethnic Children's Literature in the United States describes the history and characteristics of ethnic and multicultural children's literature in the U.S. and elsewhere, elaborating on people, businesses, and organizations that create, disseminate, promote, critique, and collect these materials"--

Dakota In Exile

Author: Linda M. Clemmons
Editor: Iowa and the Midwest Experienc
ISBN: 1609386337
File Size: 19,37 MB
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Robert Hopkins was a man caught between two worlds. As a member of the Dakota Nation, he was unfairly imprisoned, accused of taking up arms against U.S. soldiers when war broke out with the Dakota in 1862. However, as a Christian convert who was also a preacher, Hopkins's allegiance was often questioned by many of his fellow Dakota as well. Without a doubt, being a convert--and a favorite of the missionaries--had its privileges. Hopkins learned to read and write in an anglicized form of Dakota, and when facing legal allegations, he and several high-ranking missionaries wrote impassioned letters in his defense. Ultimately, he was among the 300-some Dakota spared from hanging by President Lincoln, imprisoned instead at Camp Kearney in Davenport, Iowa, for several years. His wife, Sarah, and their children, meanwhile, were forced onto the barren Crow Creek reservation in Dakota Territory with the rest of the Dakota women, children, and elderly. In both places, the Dakota were treated as novelties, displayed for curious residents like zoo animals. Historian Linda Clemmons examines the surviving letters from Robert and Sarah; other Dakota language sources; and letters from missionaries, newspaper accounts, and federal documents. She blends both the personal and the historical to complicate our understanding of the development of the Midwest, while also serving as a testament to the resilience of the Dakota and other indigenous peoples who have lived in this region from time immemorial.

Settler Colonialism Race And The Law

Author: Natsu Taylor Saito
Editor: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814723942
File Size: 52,67 MB
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How taking Indigenous sovereignty seriously can help dismantle the structural racism encountered by other people of color in the United States Settler Colonialism, Race, and the Law provides a timely analysis of structural racism at the intersection of law and colonialism. Noting the grim racial realities still confronting communities of color, and how they have not been alleviated by constitutional guarantees of equal protection, this book suggests that settler colonial theory provides a more coherent understanding of what causes and what can help remediate racial disparities. Saito attributes the origins and persistence of racialized inequities in the United States to the prerogatives asserted by its predominantly Angloamerican colonizers to appropriate Indigenous lands and resources, to profit from the labor of voluntary and involuntary migrants, and to ensure that all people of color remain “in their place.” By providing a functional analysis that links disparate forms of oppression, this book makes the case for the oft-cited proposition that racial justice is indivisible, focusing particularly on the importance of acknowledging and contesting the continued colonization of Indigenous peoples and lands. Settler Colonialism, Race, and the Law concludes that rather than relying on promises of formal equality, we will more effectively dismantle structural racism in America by envisioning what the right of all peoples to self-determination means in a settler colonial state.

The Oxford Handbook Of Sexual And Gender Minority Mental Health

Author: Esther D. Rothblum
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0190067993
File Size: 40,79 MB
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"The Oxford Handbook of Sexual and Gender Minority Mental Health provides an overview of the current research on the mental health of sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations. It is aimed at researchers conducting studies on the mental health of SGM populations, clinicians and researchers interested in psychiatric disorders that affect SGM populations, clinicians using evidence-based practice in the treatment of SGM patients/clients, students in mental health programs (clinical psychology, psychiatry, clinical social work, and psychiatric nursing), and policymakers. This chapter defines some terms and provides an overview of current and past SGM research methods"--

Reciprocity Rules

Author: Michelle C Johnson
Editor:
ISBN: 1498592953
File Size: 17,76 MB
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Focusing on compensation, friendship, and collaboration, this book explores what anthropologists and research participants give to each other in and beyond fieldwork. Contributors argue that while learning and following the local rules of reciprocity are challenging, they are essential to responsible research and efforts to decolonize anthropology.

Winds Of Change

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 76,70 MB
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The North Dakota Quarterly

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 68,99 MB
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American Studies

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 60,87 MB
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Lighting The Eighth Fire

Author: Leanne Simpson
Editor: Arp Books
ISBN:
File Size: 80,99 MB
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This remarkable collection of essays by leading Indigenous scholars focuses on the themes of freedom, liberation and Indigenous resurgence as they relate to the land. They analyze treaties, political culture, governance, environmental issues, economy, and radical social movements from an anti-colonial Indigenous perspective in a Canadian context. Editor Leanne Simpson (Nishnaabekwe) has solicited Indigenous writers that place Indigenous freedom as their highest political goal, while turning to the knowledge, traditions, and culture of specific Indigenous nations to achieve that goal. The authors offer frank and political analysis and commentary of the kind not normally found in mainstream books, journals, and magazines.

Centeotzintli

Author: Roberto Garcia Rodriguez
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 10,85 MB
Format: PDF
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American Indian Quarterly

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 62,72 MB
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Indigenizing The Museum

Author: Majel Boxer
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 21,29 MB
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This dissertation begins by situating decolonization as a theoretical tool in examining the tribal museum model. It argues that individuals, institutions, and communities engaged in tribal museum projects can uphold and perpetuate past museum methods of exhibition which were and are colonialist in nature. Thus, utilizing the theory of decolonization is important in the examination of two tribal museums; the Osage Tribal Museum, in Pawhuska, Oklahoma and the Museum at Warm Springs in Warm Springs, Oregon. The development of a decolonized tribal museum model is complicated by the notion that to be truly decolonized a colonized community can not be engaged with the very same institutions which have had a hand in their colonization. This dissertation is laid out in the following order: Chapter One examines the colonialist relationship between indigenous nations, museums, and the federal government in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; Chapter Two develops the theory of decolonization as it is understood within the U.S. context and underscores the various ways that two indigenous nations have negotiated these relationships and maintained their respective museums as sites of decolonization; Chapter Three, examines the early history of the Osage Tribal Museum which emerged in 1938 as the first tribal museum to be built by an indigenous nation; Chapter Four explores the Museum at Warm Springs and departs from the previous chapter by describing and analyzing the permanent exhibits and reading them through the lens of decolonization; finally, Chapter Five, draws upon the work of scholars employing the theory of decolonization to their reading of the NMAI. The purpose of this chapter is to illustrate the complex nature of decolonization. That is, that collaboration between the museum profession and indigenous communities is not decolonizing work; rather, it is the overarching goals of community empowerment, truth-telling, and privileging indigenous knowledge that are markers of decolonization. The dissertation concludes by asserting that decolonization as a theory and practice can be empowering to indigenous communities.

One Voice Many Voices

Author: T. L. McCarty
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 56,29 MB
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Mass Trauma And Emotional Healing Around The World

Author: Ani Kalayjian
Editor: Praeger Pub Text
ISBN: 9780313375408
File Size: 29,89 MB
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A remarkable team of expert authors provide firsthand accounts from survivors of disasters around the globe, helping readers to understand the impact of trauma as well as interventions to heal. Around the world, scores of those who survive disasters have demonstrated a remarkable resilience that enables them to live happy, productive lives. Mass Trauma and Emotional Healing around the World: Rituals and Practices for Resilience and Meaning-Making documents the unique yet universal reaction to traumatic events and sets the agenda for future development of therapeutic interventions research and theory. An integrative approach to rituals and healing methods is highlighted to address and help prevent human-made traumas and prepare generations to cope with natural disasters in a more effective way. Chapters focus on rituals and practices for resilience after mass trauma, showing, among other findings, that storytelling, music, humor, and a belief in fate help people survive disasters worldwide. * Includes disaster accounts from trauma victims to provide practical examples of how they have healed, focusing on the use of cultural practices, religious and spiritual rituals, and indigenous practices in coping, resilience, and meaning-making after disasters * Offers a multicultural bibliography of significant materials covering marginalized people around the world, including those in developing countries

Beyond Red Power

Author: Daniel M. Cobb
Editor: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN:
File Size: 48,26 MB
Format: PDF
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How do we explain not just the survival of Indian people in the United States against very long odds but their growing visibility and political power at the opening of the twenty-first century? Within this one story of indigenous persistence are many stories of local, regional, national, and international activism that require a nuanced understanding of what it means to be an activist or to act in politically purposeful ways. Even the nearly universal demand for sovereignty encompasses multiple definitions that derive from factors both external and internal to Indian communities. Struggles over the form and membership of tribal governments, fishing rights, dances, casinos, language revitalization, and government recognition constitute arenas in which Indians and their non-Indian allies ensure the survival of tribal community and sovereignty. Whether contesting termination locally, demanding reparations for stolen lands in the federal courts, or placing their case for decolonization in a global context, American Indians use institutions and political rhetorics that they did not necessarily create for their own ends.

Tribal College Transfer Student Success At Four Year Predominantly White Institutions

Author: Matthew Van Alstine Makomenaw
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 11,24 MB
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In The Footsteps Of Our Ancestors

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 64,79 MB
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Essays in words and pictures that tell the story of the Dakota Death March of November 1862. In the words of the author, they stand as a narrative that reclaims our right to tell our stories in our own ways and for our own purposes. From publisher description.