Going Alt Ac

Author: Kathryn E. Linder
Editor: Stylus Publishing (VA)
ISBN: 9781620368312
File Size: 31,93 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A growing number of people completing or holding graduate degrees now seek non-faculty positions--also called alternative academic, or "alt-ac" positions--at different stages in their careers. While an increasing number of people with doctoral degrees are hunting for a diminishing pool of tenure-track faculty jobs, most degree-granting institutions do not adequately prepare their graduate students to enter the new reality of the alt-ac job market. Yet the administrative ranks in higher education institutions are growing, as colleges and universities are creating a diverse range of positions that support teaching and learning efforts. Focusing on the range of potential alternative career choices, this highly practical book offers tools and prompts for readers who are: Considering whether to choose an alt-ac career path Seeking specific alt-ac positions Advising graduate students or mentoring recent professional graduates Encountering alt-ac career challenges The authors offer case stories--their own and those of colleagues across North America in alt-ac roles--with concrete examples designed to help readers pursue, obtain, and excel in a wide variety of alt-ac positions. The book can equally be used as a resource for graduate courses on professional development and job-market preparation.
Going Alt-Ac
Language: en
Pages: 264
Authors: Kathryn E. Linder, Kevin Kelly, Thomas J. Tobin
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020 - Publisher: Stylus Publishing (VA)

A growing number of people completing or holding graduate degrees now seek non-faculty positions--also called alternative academic, or "alt-ac" positions--at different stages in their careers. While an increasing number of people with doctoral degrees are hunting for a diminishing pool of tenure-track faculty jobs, most degree-granting institutions do not adequately
Going Alt-Ac
Language: en
Pages: 204
Authors: Kevin Kelly, Kathryn E. Linder, Thomas J. Tobin
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-01-13 - Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC

A growing number of people completing or holding graduate degrees now seek non-faculty positions—also called alternative academic, or “alt-ac” positions—at different stages in their careers. While an increasing number of people with doctoral degrees are hunting for a diminishing pool of tenure-track faculty jobs, most degree-granting institutions do not adequately
Keywords for American Cultural Studies, Third Edition
Language: en
Pages: 360
Authors: Bruce Burgett, Glenn Hendler
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-11-24 - Publisher: NYU Press

Introduces key terms, research traditions, debates, and histories for American Studies and Cultural Studies in an updated edition Since its initial publication, scholars and students alike have turned to Keywords for American Cultural Studies as an invaluable resource for understanding key terms and debates in the fields of American studies
Perspectives on Teaching Language and Content
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: Stacey Katz Bourns, Cheryl Krueger, Nicole Mills
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-06-23 - Publisher: Yale University Press

An overview of current issues and developments in foreign language education, designed for instructors of language, literature, and culture at any stage of their careers A contemporary guide to language teaching, this book presents the latest developments and issues in the field of applied linguistics. Written by scholars with expertise
Managing Your Professional Identity Online
Language: en
Pages: 196
Authors: Kathryn E. Linder
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-11-30 - Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC

In higher education, professional online identities have become increasingly important. A rightly worded tweet can cause an academic blog post to go viral. A wrongly worded tweet can get a professor fired. Regular news items in The Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed provide evidence that reputations are