Graphic Satire In The Soviet Union

Author: John Etty
Editor: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1496820533
File Size: 79,97 MB
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After the death of Joseph Stalin, Soviet-era Russia experienced a flourishing artistic movement due to relaxed censorship and new economic growth. In this new atmosphere of freedom, Russia's satirical magazine Krokodil (The Crocodile) became rejuvenated. John Etty explores Soviet graphic satire through Krokodil and its political cartoons. He investigates the forms, production, consumption, and functions of Krokodil, focusing on the period from 1954 to 1964. Krokodil remained the longest-serving and most important satirical journal in the Soviet Union, unique in producing state-sanctioned graphic satirical comment on Soviet and international affairs for over seventy years. Etty's analysis of Krokodil extends and enhances our understanding of Soviet graphic satire beyond state-sponsored propaganda. For most of its life, Krokodil consisted of a sixteen-page satirical magazine comprising a range of cartoons, photographs, and verbal texts. Authored by professional and nonprofessional contributors and published by Pravda in Moscow, it produced state-sanctioned satirical comment on Soviet and international affairs from 1922 onward. Soviet citizens and scholars of the USSR recognized Krokodil as the most significant, influential source of Soviet graphic satire. Indeed, the magazine enjoyed an international reputation, and many Americans and Western Europeans, regardless of political affiliation, found the images pointed and witty. Astoundingly, the magazine outlived the USSR but until now has received little scholarly attention.
Graphic Satire in the Soviet Union
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: John Etty
Categories: Art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-01-15 - Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

After the death of Joseph Stalin, Soviet-era Russia experienced a flourishing artistic movement due to relaxed censorship and new economic growth. In this new atmosphere of freedom, Russia's satirical magazine Krokodil (The Crocodile) became rejuvenated. John Etty explores Soviet graphic satire through Krokodil and its political cartoons. He investigates the
Graphic Satire in the Soviet Union
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: John Etty
Categories: Art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-01-15 - Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

After the death of Joseph Stalin, Soviet-era Russia experienced a flourishing artistic movement due to relaxed censorship and new economic growth. In this new atmosphere of freedom, Russia's satirical magazine Krokodil (The Crocodile) became rejuvenated. John Etty explores Soviet graphic satire through Krokodil and its political cartoons. He investigates the
Russian Culture in the Age of Globalization
Language: en
Pages: 318
Authors: Vlad Strukov, Sarah Hudspith
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-12-11 - Publisher: Routledge

This book brings together scholars from across a variety of disciplines who use different methodologies to interrogate the changing nature of Russian culture in the twenty-first century. The book considers a wide range of cultural forms that have been instrumental in globalizing Russia. These include literature, art, music, film, media,
The Oxford Handbook of Communist Visual Cultures
Language: en
Pages: 640
Authors: Aga Skrodzka, Xiaoning Lu, Katarzyna Marciniak
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-04-01 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Stereotypes often cast communism as a defunct, bankrupt ideology and a relic of the distant past. However, recent political movements like Europe's anti-austerity protests, the Arab Spring, and Occupy Wall Street suggest that communism is still very much relevant and may even hold the key to a new, idealized future.
Imaging and Mapping Eastern Europe
Language: en
Pages: 252
Authors: Katarzyna Murawska-Muthesius
Categories: Art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-05-11 - Publisher: Routledge

Imaging and Mapping Eastern Europe puts images centre stage and argues for the agency of the visual in the construction of Europe’s east as a socio-political and cultural entity. This book probes into the discontinuous processes of mapping the eastern European space and imaging the eastern European body. Beginning from