Possession In Languages Of Europe And North And Central Asia

Author: Lars Johanson
Editor: John Benjamins Publishing Company
ISBN: 9027263000
Size: 11,89 MB
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This volume is a collection of articles dealing with the linguistic category of possession and its expression in languages spoken in Europe and North and Central Asia (Uralic, Turkic, Indo-European and Caucasian), with a few excursions into other parts of the world. Some papers engage in typological comparisons, both within and beyond the borders of individual language families focusing on issues of motivation; meaning and forms used in expressing possession; typology of belong constructions; marking possession in possessor chains; non-canonical possessives and their relation to the category of familiarity; metaphoric shifts of possessive semantics. Others focus on possession in individual languages, offering new precious pieces of information on the linguistic expression of possession in lesser known languages, some of which are endangered and even unwritten. The volume will be of interest to both general linguists and typologists as well as to experts/students of the individual languages or language families analyzed in the papers.

Transmedia Harry Potter

Author: Christopher E. Bell
Editor: McFarland
ISBN: 1476637024
Size: 15,66 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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 Transmediation--the telling of a single story across multiple media--is a relatively new phenomenon. While there have been adaptations (books to films, for example) for more than a century, modern technology and media consumption have expanded the scope of trans-mediating practices. Nowhere are these more evident than within the Harry Potter universe, where a coherent world and narrative are iterated across books, films, video games, fan fiction, art, music and more. Curated by a leading Harry Potter scholar, this collection of new essays explores the range of Potter texts across a variety of media.

Competing Comparative Constructions In Europe

Author: Thomas Stolz
Editor: Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: 3050064994
Size: 20,30 MB
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This in-depth areal-typological study analyzes the grammatical means which are employed in the languages of Europe to express the comparative of inequality/superiority. The extant theories and hypotheses about the morphosyntactic structure and the cross-linguistic distribution of construction types are reviewed. The behavior of comparatives under the conditions of language contact is discussed. Data from more than 170 standard and nonstandard varieties of European languages are scrutinized systematically. The synchronic picture is complemented by a chapter on the diachrony of comparative constructions. The European facts are compared to those of the geographically adjacent Asian and African regions. It is argued that cross-linguistic investigations must take account also of so-called secondary options. These secondary options suggest strongly that the supposedly dominant role of the particle comparative cannot be upheld for Europe. Moreover, only the secondary options allow us to draw isoglosses which cross the borders between Europe and Asia (and Africa).

Split Possession

Author:
Editor: John Benjamins Publishing
ISBN: 9789027205681
Size: 14,13 MB
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This book is a functional-typological study of possession splits in European languages. It shows that genetically and structurally diverse languages such as Icelandic, Welsh, and Maltese display possessive systems which are sensitive to semantically based distinctions reminiscent of the alienability correlation. These distinctions are grammatically relevant in many European languages because they require dedicated constructions. What makes these split possessive systems interesting for the linguist is the interaction of semantic criteria with pragmatics and syntax. Neutralisation of distinctions occurs under focus. The same happens if one of the constituents of a possessive construction is syntactically heavy. These effects can be observed in the majority of the 50 sample languages. Possessive splits are strong in those languages which are outside the Standard Average European group. The bulk of the European languages do not behave much differently from those non-European languages for which possession splits are reported. The book reveals interesting new facts about European languages and possession to typologists, universals researchers, and areal linguists.