How The States Got Their Shapes

Author: Mr. Mark Stein
Editor: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061899860
File Size: 72,72 MB
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Why does Oklahoma have that panhandle? Did someone make a mistake? We are so familiar with the map of the United States that our state borders seem as much a part of nature as mountains and rivers. Even the oddities—the entire state of Maryland(!)—have become so engrained that our map might as well be a giant jigsaw puzzle designed by Divine Providence. But that's where the real mystery begins. Every edge of the familiar wooden jigsaw pieces of our childhood represents a revealing moment of history and of, well, humans drawing lines in the sand. How the States Got Their Shapes is the first book to tackle why our state lines are where they are. Here are the stories behind the stories, right down to the tiny northward jog at the eastern end of Tennessee and the teeny-tiny (and little known) parts of Delaware that are not attached to Delaware but to New Jersey. How the States Got Their Shapes examines: Why West Virginia has a finger creeping up the side of Pennsylvania Why Michigan has an upper peninsula that isn't attached to Michigan Why some Hawaiian islands are not Hawaii Why Texas and California are so outsized, especially when so many Midwestern states are nearly identical in size Packed with fun oddities and trivia, this entertaining guide also reveals the major fault lines of American history, from ideological intrigues and religious intolerance to major territorial acquisitions. Adding the fresh lens of local geographic disputes, military skirmishes, and land grabs, Mark Stein shows how the seemingly haphazard puzzle pieces of our nation fit together perfectly.

How The States Got Their Shapes Too

Author: Mark Stein
Editor: Smithsonian Inst Press
ISBN: 1588343502
File Size: 43,99 MB
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Examines the people who helped determine the state lines, including Roger Williams, Daniel Webster, and Ethan Allen and explains the history that can be found in these boundaries.

The Creative Classroom

Author: Keith Sawyer
Editor: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807761214
File Size: 45,22 MB
Format: PDF
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The Creative Classroom presents an original, compelling vision of schools where teaching and learning are centered on creativity. Drawing on the latest research as well as his studies of jazz and improvised theater, Sawyer describes curricula and classroom practices that will help educators get started with a new style of teaching, guided improvisation, where students are given freedom to explore within structures provided by the teacher. Readers will learn how to improve learning outcomes in all subjects—from science and math to history and language arts—by helping students master content-area standards at the same time as they increase their creative potential. This book shows how teachers and school leaders can work together to overcome all-too-common barriers to creative teaching—leadership, structure, and culture—and collaborate to transform schools into creative organizations. Book Features: Presents a research-based approach to teaching and learning for creativity. Identifies which learning outcomes support creativity and offers practical advice for how to teach for these outcomes. Shows how students learn content-area knowledge while also learning to be creative with that knowledge. Describes principles and techniques that teachers can use in all subjects. Demonstrates that a combination of school structures, cultures, incentives, and leadership are needed to support creative teaching and learning.

Bastions On The Border

Author: James P. Millard
Editor:
ISBN: 9780974985411
File Size: 13,80 MB
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Fort Montgomery Through The Years

Author: James P. Millard
Editor:
ISBN: 9780974985428
File Size: 20,94 MB
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This title is the only book ever written about Fort Montgomery on Lake Champlain in Rouses Point, New York. Features over 160 photos, vintage and modern, almost all never before published.

The Economist

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File Size: 51,81 MB
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American Spirit

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File Size: 76,32 MB
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Library Of Congress Information Bulletin

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File Size: 78,60 MB
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Inside Smithsonian Research

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File Size: 21,54 MB
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Talking Book Topics

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File Size: 29,78 MB
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Creating The American West

Author: Derek R. Everett
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806146141
File Size: 56,31 MB
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Boundaries—lines imposed on the landscape—shape our lives, dictating everything from which candidates we vote for to what schools our children attend to the communities with which we identify. In Creating the American West, historian Derek R. Everett examines the function of these internal lines in American history generally and in the West in particular. Drawing lines to create states in the trans-Mississippi West, he points out, imposed a specific form of political organization that made the West truly American. Everett examines how settlers lobbied for boundaries and how politicians imposed them. He examines the origins of boundary-making in the United States from the colonial era through the Louisiana Purchase. Case studies then explore the ethnic, sectional, political, and economic angles of boundaries. Everett first examines the boundaries between Arkansas and its neighboring Native cultures, and the pseudo war between Missouri and Iowa. He then traces the lines splitting the Oregon Country and the states of California and Nevada, and considers the ethnic and political consequences of the boundary between New Mexico and Colorado. He explains the evolution of the line splitting the Dakotas, and concludes with a discussion of ways in which state boundaries can contribute toward new interpretations of borderlands history. A major theme in the history of state boundaries is the question of whether to use geometric or geographic lines—in other words, lines corresponding to parallels and meridians or those fashioned by natural features. With the distribution of western land, Everett shows, geography gave way to geometry and transformed the West. The end of boundary-making in the late nineteenth century is not the end of the story, however. These lines continue to complicate a host of issues including water rights, taxes, political representation, and immigration. Creating the American West shows how the past continues to shape the present.

Digital Talking Books Plus

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File Size: 80,94 MB
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The Handbook Of Language Variation And Change

Author: J. K. Chambers
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118335511
File Size: 77,97 MB
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Reflecting a multitude of developments in the study of language change and variation over the last ten years, this extensively updated second edition features a number of new chapters and remains the authoritative reference volume on a core research area in linguistics. A fully revised and expanded edition of this acclaimed reference work, which has established its reputation based on its unrivalled scope and depth of analysis in this interdisciplinary field Includes seven new chapters, while the remainder have undergone thorough revision and updating to incorporate the latest research and reflect numerous developments in the field Accessibly structured by theme, covering topics including data collection and evaluation, linguistic structure, language and time, language contact, language domains, and social differentiation Brings together an experienced, international editorial and contributor team to provides an unrivalled learning, teaching and reference tool for researchers and students in sociolinguistics

Minnesota

Author: Daniel E. Harmon
Editor: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc
ISBN: 1448800447
File Size: 18,94 MB
Format: PDF
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Presents the history, geography, government, economy, and people of Minnesota, as well as general facts about the state.

21st Century Geography

Author: Joseph P. Stoltman
Editor: SAGE
ISBN: 141297464X
File Size: 21,82 MB
Format: PDF
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This is a theoretical and practical guide on how to undertake and navigate advanced research in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

Florida Law Review

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File Size: 67,72 MB
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Book Review Index

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File Size: 32,43 MB
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The Not Quite States Of America Dispatches From The Territories And Other Far Flung Outposts Of The Usa

Author: Doug Mack
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393247619
File Size: 14,48 MB
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“To truly understand the United States, one must understand The Not-Quite States of America.” —Mark Stein, best-selling author of How the States Got Their Shapes Everyone knows that America is 50 states and… some other stuff. The U.S. territories—American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands—and their 4 million people are little known and often forgotten, so Doug Mack set out on a 30,000-mile journey to learn about them. How did they come to be part of the United States? What are they like today? And why aren’t they states? Deeply researched and richly reported, The Not-Quite States of America is an entertaining and unprecedented account of the territories’ crucial yet overlooked place in the American story.

Braille Book Review

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Vice Capades

Author: Mark Stein
Editor: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 1612349277
File Size: 57,86 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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From outlawing bowling in colonial America to regulating violent video games and synthetic drugs today, Mark Stein's Vice Capades examines the nation's relationship with the actions, attitudes, and antics that have defined morality. This humorous and quirky history reveals that our views of vice are formed not merely by morals but by power. While laws against nude dancing have become less restrictive, laws restricting sexual harassment have been enacted. While marijuana is no longer illegal everywhere, restrictive laws have been enacted against cigarettes. Stein examines this nation's inconsistent moral compass and how the powers-that-be in each era determine what is or is not deemed a vice. From the Puritans who founded Massachusetts with unyielding, biblically based laws to those modern purveyors of morality who currently campaign against video game violence, Vice Capades looks at the American history we all know from a fresh and exciting perspective and shows how vice has shaped our nation, sometimes without us even knowing it.