Hunger

Author: James Vernon
Editor: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674044673
Size: 19,17 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Rigorously researched, Hunger: A Modern History draws together social, cultural, and political history, to show us how we came to have a moral, political, and social responsibility toward the hungry. Vernon forcefully reminds us how many perished from hunger in the empire and reveals how their history was intricately connected with the precarious achievements of the welfare state in Britain, as well as with the development of international institutions committed to the conquest of world hunger.

Modern Britain 1750 To The Present

Author: James Vernon
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108293506
Size: 17,21 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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This wide-ranging introduction to the history of modern Britain extends from the eighteenth century to the present day. James Vernon's distinctive history is weaved around an account of the rise, fall and reinvention of liberal ideas of how markets, governments and empires should work. The history takes seriously the different experiences within the British Isles and the British Empire, and offers a global history of Britain. Instead of tracing how Britons made the modern world, Vernon shows how the world shaped the course of Britain's modern history. Richly illustrated with figures and maps, the book features textboxes (on particular people, places and sources), further reading guides, highlighted key terms and a glossary. A supplementary online package includes additional primary sources, discussion questions, and further reading suggestions, including useful links. This textbook is an essential resource for introductory courses on the history of modern Britain.

Writing Food History

Author: Kyri W. Claflin
Editor: Berg
ISBN: 0857852175
Size: 18,84 MB
Format: PDF
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The vibrant interest in food studies among both academics and amateurs has made food history an exciting field of investigation. Taking stock of three decades of groundbreaking multidisciplinary research, the book examines two broad questions: What has history contributed to the development of food studies? How have other disciplines - sociology, anthropology, literary criticism, science, art history - influenced writing on food history in terms of approach, methodology, controversies, and knowledge of past foodways? Essays by twelve prominent scholars provide a compendium of global and multicultural answers to these questions. The contributors critically assess food history writing in the United States, Africa, Mexico and the Spanish Diaspora, India, the Ottoman Empire, the Far East - China, Japan and Korea - Europe, Jewish communities and the Middle East. Several historical eras are covered: the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, Early Modern Europe and the Modern day. The book is a unique addition to the growing literature on food history. It is required reading for anyone seeking a detailed discussion of food history research in diverse times and places.

Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl

Author: Carrie Brownstein
Editor: Penguin
ISBN: 1101599545
Size: 10,24 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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From the guitarist of the pioneering band Sleater-Kinney, the book Kim Gordon says "everyone has been waiting for" and a New York Times Notable Book of 2015-- a candid, funny, and deeply personal look at making a life--and finding yourself--in music. Before Carrie Brownstein became a music icon, she was a young girl growing up in the Pacific Northwest just as it was becoming the setting for one the most important movements in rock history. Seeking a sense of home and identity, she would discover both while moving from spectator to creator in experiencing the power and mystery of a live performance. With Sleater-Kinney, Brownstein and her bandmates rose to prominence in the burgeoning underground feminist punk-rock movement that would define music and pop culture in the 1990s. They would be cited as “America’s best rock band” by legendary music critic Greil Marcus for their defiant, exuberant brand of punk that resisted labels and limitations, and redefined notions of gender in rock. HUNGER MAKES ME A MODERN GIRL is an intimate and revealing narrative of her escape from a turbulent family life into a world where music was the means toward self-invention, community, and rescue. Along the way, Brownstein chronicles the excitement and contradictions within the era’s flourishing and fiercely independent music subculture, including experiences that sowed the seeds for the observational satire of the popular television series Portlandia years later. With deft, lucid prose Brownstein proves herself as formidable on the page as on the stage. Accessibly raw, honest and heartfelt, this book captures the experience of being a young woman, a born performer and an outsider, and ultimately finding one’s true calling through hard work, courage and the intoxicating power of rock and roll. From the Hardcover edition.

A Modern History Of Tanganyika

Author: John Iliffe
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521296113
Size: 14,99 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The first comprehensive and fully documented history of modern Tanganyika (mainland Tanzania).

Food Choices

Author: Robin F. Brancato
Editor: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 9780810869783
Size: 14,64 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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There are a host of books on dieting, nutrition, cooking, and all other areas related to food, yet books targeted to teens tend to emphasize weight and the dangers of unhealthy eating. Food Choices: The Ultimate Teen Guide provides teens with a new look at food and eating. In this book, author Robin Brancato chooses not to dwell on food-related pathologies like anorexia, bulimia, or obesity. Instead, she guides teens into a greater knowledge and enjoyment of food and healthy eating. This book discusses numerous topics related to food and eating, including the biological and chemical reasons we prefer certain foods and the eating habits that are unique to teens today. This book also covers the latest medical research, the vast amount of literature on weight loss and dieting, and the cultural influences that affect what food we eat. Throughout, teens are presented with the best tips on how to develop healthy eating habits for a lifetime of enjoying food.

Hungry Nation

Author: Benjamin Robert Siegel
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108695051
Size: 13,74 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This ambitious and engaging new account of independent India's struggle to overcome famine and malnutrition in the twentieth century traces Indian nation-building through the voices of politicians, planners, and citizens. Siegel explains the historical origins of contemporary India's hunger and malnutrition epidemic, showing how food and sustenance moved to the center of nationalist thought in the final years of colonial rule. Independent India's politicians made promises of sustenance and then qualified them by asking citizens to share the burden of feeding a new and hungry state. Foregrounding debates over land, markets, and new technologies, Hungry Nation interrogates how citizens and politicians contested the meanings of nation-building and citizenship through food, and how these contestations receded in the wake of the Green Revolution. Drawing upon meticulous archival research, this is the story of how Indians challenged meanings of welfare and citizenship across class, caste, region, and gender in a new nation-state.

Philanthropy And Settler Colonialism

Author: A. O'Brien
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137440503
Size: 14,70 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book, the first long-range history of the voluntary sector in Australia and the first internationally to compare philanthropy for Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in a settler society, explores how the race and gender ideologies embedded in philanthropy contributed to the construction of Australia's welfare state.

Edible Histories Cultural Politics

Author: Franca Iacovetta
Editor: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442661518
Size: 14,72 MB
Format: PDF
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Just as the Canada's rich past resists any singular narrative, there is no such thing as a singular Canadian food tradition. This new book explores Canada's diverse food cultures and the varied relationships that Canadians have had historically with food practices in the context of community, region, nation and beyond. Based on findings from menus, cookbooks, government documents, advertisements, media sources, oral histories, memoirs, and archival collections, Edible Histories offers a veritable feast of original research on Canada's food history and its relationship to culture and politics. This exciting collection explores a wide variety of topics, including urban restaurant culture, ethnic cuisines, and the controversial history of margarine in Canada. It also covers a broad time-span, from early contact between European settlers and First Nations through the end of the twentieth century. Edible Histories intertwines information of Canada's 'foodways' – the practices and traditions associated with food and food preparation – and stories of immigration, politics, gender, economics, science, medicine and religion. Sophisticated, culturally sensitive, and accessible, Edible Histories will appeal to students, historians, and foodies alike.