Jewish Daily Life In Germany 1618 1945

Author: Marion A. Kaplan
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195346794
File Size: 18,19 MB
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From the seventeenth century until the Holocaust, Germany's Jews lurched between progress and setback, between fortune and terrible misfortune. German society shunned Jews in the eighteenth century and opened unevenly to them in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, only to turn murderous in the Nazi era. By examining the everyday lives of ordinary Jews, this book portrays the drama of German-Jewish history -- the gradual ascent of Jews from impoverished outcasts to comfortable bourgeois citizens and then their dramatic descent into genocidal torment during the Nazi years. Building on social, economic, religious, and political history, it focuses on the qualitative aspects of ordinary life -- emotions, subjective impressions, and quotidian perceptions. How did ordinary Jews and their families make sense of their world? How did they construe changes brought about by industrialization? How did they make decisions to enter new professions or stick with the old, juggle traditional mores with contemporary ways? The Jewish adoption of secular, modern European culture and the struggle for legal equality exacted profound costs, both material and psychological. Even in the heady years of progress, a basic insecurity informed German-Jewish life. Jewish successes existed alongside an antisemitism that persisted as a frightful leitmotif throughout German-Jewish history. And yet the history that emerges from these pages belies simplistic interpretations that German antisemitism followed a straight path from Luther to Hitler. Neither Germans nor Jews can be typecast in their roles vis ? vis one another. Non-Jews were not uniformly antisemitic but exhibited a wide range of attitudes towards Jews. Jewish daily life thus provides another vantage point from which to study the social life of Germany. Focusing on both internal Jewish life -- family, religion, culture and Jewish community -- and the external world of German culture and society provides a uniquely well-rounded portrait of a world defined by the shifting sands of inclusion and exclusion.
Jewish Daily Life in Germany, 1618-1945
Language: en
Pages: 244
Authors: Marion A. Kaplan
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-03-03 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

From the seventeenth century until the Holocaust, Germany's Jews lurched between progress and setback, between fortune and terrible misfortune. German society shunned Jews in the eighteenth century and opened unevenly to them in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, only to turn murderous in the Nazi era. By examining the
Between Dignity and Despair
Language: en
Pages: 290
Authors: Marion A. Kaplan
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1999 - Publisher: Studies in Jewish History

Draws on memoirs, diaries, and letters of Jews living in Nazi Germany at the start of the holocaust
After the Holocaust
Language: en
Pages: 196
Authors: Michael Brenner
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1999-04-12 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

With the benefit of never-before-published eyewitness accounts from Holocaust survivors, a professor at the University of Munich follows the fate of the Jews who survived the Holocaust and remained in Germany immediately following World War II. UP.
Jews in Today's German Culture
Language: en
Pages: 132
Authors: Sander L. Gilman, Goldwin Smith Professor of Humane Studies Sander L Gilman
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1995 - Publisher:

This is the first book to examine an emerging new German Jewish culture that has become visible since the fall of the Berlin Wall. The Shoah seemed to have erased the historical Jewish presence in German culture. Since the late 1980s, however, a once-silent and therefore relatively invisible Jewish community
A Community Under Siege
Language: en
Pages: 324
Authors: Abraham Ascher
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007 - Publisher: Stanford University Press

This is a study of how the Jewish community of Breslau--the third largest and one of the most affluent in Germany--coped with Nazi persecution. Ascher has included the experiences of his immediate family, although the book is based mainly on archival sources, numerous personal reminiscences, as well as publications by