The Jews In The Legal Sources Of The Early Middle Ages

Author: Amnon Linder
Editor: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814324035
File Size: 48,18 MB
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Jewry law, the corpus of legal texts and practices that regulated the life of the Jews in their relations with the medieval Christian society, in one of the main sources of evidence on medieval Jewish history. This volume presents a comprehensive collection of the legal texts bearing specifically on the Jews during the early Middle Ages, from the disappearance of the unitary imperial system in the fifth and sixth centuries to the emergence of centralized governmental structures and the codification of canon law, roughly between the close of the eleventh century and the middle of the twelth century. The special legal texts that were evolved in regard to the Jews are important for two basic reasons. First, they document the ideological stances, policies, and practical means of application adopted and carried out in regard to the Jews by the ecclesiastical and the secular authorities. This documentation allows historians to reconstruct the roles performed by these two governmental networks, which practically monopolized between them the authority and the responsibility for the creation and application of Jewry law. Second, the importance of this body of texts derives from its specificity in regard to the Jews. By definition, common law and other "extraneous" laws were not directed specifically at Jews. They were applicable to Jews when Jews were included in a population subject to them or to the extent that Jews were involved in situations they controlled. This legal situation, which presupposes that Jews and non-Jews share a certain legal equality, at least in the matters covered by these laws, clearly diverges from the fundamental assumption that provided Jewry law with its main justification, namely, the legitimate otherness of the Jews as expressed and embodied in their special legal regime. While the evidence on the participation of the Jews in general legal frameworks should be considered as extremely important, the search for their specificity leads the historian, unavoidably, to the special legal texts and practices evolved in their regard. Amnon Linder's aim has been comprehensiveness rather than selectivity. The Jews in Legal Sources of the Early Middle Ages is the first and only corpus of the relevant sources in their original Greek or Latin and in English translation. The texts have been arranged in five parts, with each part consisting of separate sources, 142 in all. They are divided into 1,016 smaller text-units, given in their original textual forms (canons, chapters, paragraphs, laws). Each source opens with a short introduction on its history and transmission. Each text-unit opens with exact reference (books, titles, chapters, paragraphs, laws); its original incipit; its rubric; and its inscription in translation. Bibliographical references and footnotes have been restricted to the bare minimum, but they are designed to provide basic pointers for a more extensive bibliographical search. This book provides historians with all the relevant texts available in print, which Linder has supplemented with certain texts still unpublished, known from manuscript versions only.

The Jews In The Legal Sources Of The Early Middle Ages

Author: Amnon Linder
Editor:
ISBN: 9780814324035
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This volume presents a collection of the legal texts bearing specifically on the Jews during the early Middle Ages. The texts have been arranged in five parts, with each part consisting of separate sources. Each source opens with a short introduction on its history and transmission.

Popes Church And Jews In The Middle Ages

Author: Kenneth R. Stow
Editor: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9780754659150
File Size: 18,86 MB
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The theme uniting the essays reprinted here is the attitude of the medieval Church, and in particular the papacy, towards the Jewish population of Western Europe. The studies in the first part of this volume focus on those issues, while those in the second part explore aspects of Jewish society and family life, shaped by the circumstances in which they found themselves.

Jews In The Early Modern World

Author: Dean Phillip Bell
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742545182
File Size: 73,59 MB
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Jews in the Early Modern World presents a comparative and global history of the Jews for the early modern period, 1400-1700. It traces the remarkable demographic changes experienced by Jews around the globe and assesses the impact of those changes on Jewish communal and social structures, religious and cultural practices, and relations with non-Jews.

Money Morality And Culture In Late Medieval And Early Modern Europe

Author: Juliann M. Vitullo
Editor: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9780754664970
File Size: 35,74 MB
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One of the first volumes to explore the intersection of economics, morality, and culture, this collection analyzes the role of the developing monetary economy in Western Europe from the twelfth to the seventeenth century. The contributors--scholars from the fields of history, literature, art history and musicology--explore how money infiltrated every aspect of everyday life, modified notions of social identity, and encouraged debates about ethical uses of wealth.

Gender And Sexuality In The Middle Ages

Author: Martha A. Brozyna
Editor: McFarland
ISBN: 0786420421
File Size: 60,22 MB
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"This reader brings documents from throughout the medieval world into one collection. The book's chapters are organized according to nine areas allowing for comparative examination of different societies and periods of the Middle Ages"--Provided by publisher.

Reconstructing Ashkenaz

Author: David Malkiel
Editor: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804786844
File Size: 69,45 MB
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Reconstructing Ashkenaz shows that, contrary to traditional accounts, the Jews of Western Europe in the High Middle Ages were not a society of saints and martyrs. David Malkiel offers provocative revisions of commonly held interpretations of Jewish martyrdom in the First Crusade massacres, the level of obedience to rabbinic authority, and relations with apostates and with Christians. In the process, he also reexamines and radically revises the view that Ashkenazic Jewry was more pious than its Sephardic counterpart.

Representations Of Jews In Late Medieval And Early Modern German Literature

Author: John D. Martin
Editor: Peter Lang
ISBN: 9783039107186
File Size: 80,47 MB
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It is commonly held that medieval Christians viewed medieval Jews in exclusively negative terms. This is certainly the dominant opinion in much twentieth-century scholarship, and it is not wholly without justification. It is, however, an opinion that does not accurately reflect the breadth of medieval German Christian thinking about medieval German Jews. Drawing on Passion plays, hagiographical narratives and didactic literature, this monograph reveals a hitherto largely unacknowledged diversity in medieval German representations of Jews. In many of the best-attested texts from the late medieval and early modern periods, Jews appear in German literature as sympathetic, even morally exemplary figures.

Christian Jewish Relations Through The Centuries

Author: Stanley E. Porter
Editor: A&C Black
ISBN: 9780567041708
File Size: 21,37 MB
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Christian-Jewish relations have had changing fortunes throughout the centuries. Occasionally there has been peace and even mutual understanding, but usually these relations have been ones of tension, often involving recrimination and even violence. This volume addresses a number of the major questions that have been at the heart and the periphery of these tenuous relations through the years. The volume begins with a number of papers discussing relations as Christianity emerged from and defined itself in terms of Judaism. Other papers trace the relations through the intervening years. And a number of papers confront issues that have been at the heart of the troubled twentieth century. In all, these papers address a sensitive yet vital set of issues from a variety of approaches and perspectives, becoming in their own way a part of the ongoing dialogue.

Christian Jewish Relations 1000 1300

Author: Anna Sapir Abulafia
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317867718
File Size: 39,47 MB
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The history of relations between Jews and Christians has been a long, complex and often unsettled one; yet histories of medieval Christendom have traditionally paid only passing attention to the role played by Jews in a predominantly Christian society. This book provides an original survey of medieval Christian-Jewish relations encompassing England, Spain, France and Germany, and sheds light in the process on the major developments in medieval history between 1000 and 1300. Anna Sapir Abulafia's balanced yet humane account offers a new perspective on Christian-Jewish relations by analysing the theological, socio-economic and political services Jews were required to render to medieval Christendom. The nature of Jewish service varied greatly as Christian rulers struggled to reconcile the desire to profit from the presence of Jewish men and women in their lands with conflicting theological notions about Judaism. Jews meanwhile had to deal with the many competing authorities and interests in the localities in which they lived; their continued presence hinged on a fine balance between theology and pragmatism. The book examines the impact of the Crusades on Christian-Jewish relations and analyses how anti-Jewish libels were used to define relations. Making adept use of both Latin and Hebrew sources, Abulafia draws on liturgical and exegetical material, and narrative, polemical and legal sources, to give a vivid and accurate sense of how Christians interacted with Jews and Jews with Christians.

The Talmud

Author:
Editor: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141916060
File Size: 25,28 MB
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The Talmud is one of the most significant religious texts in the world, second only to the Bible in its importance to Judaism. As the Bible is the word of God, The Talmud applies that word to the lives of its followers. In a range of styles including commentary, parables, proverbs and anecdotes, it provides guidance on all aspects of everyday life from ownership to commerce to relationships. This selection of its most illuminating passages makes accessible the centuries of Jewish thought within The Talmud. Norman Solomon's clear translation from the Bavli (Babylonian) Talmud is accompanied by an introduction on its arrangement, social and historical background, reception and authors. This edition also includes appendixes of background information, a glossary, time line, maps and indexes.

Understanding Religious Pluralism

Author: Peter C. Phan
Editor: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1630874892
File Size: 65,36 MB
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Our contemporary world is fast becoming religiously diverse in a variety of ways. Thanks to globalization and migration, to mention only two current worldwide trends, people of diverse and sometimes mutually hostile faiths are now sharing neighborhoods and encountering one another's religious traditions on a daily basis. For scholars in religious studies and theology the issue to be examined is whether religious diversity is merely the result of historical development and social interaction, or whether it is inherent in the object of belief--part of the very structure of faith and our attempts to understand and express it. The essays in this volume range from explorations of the impact of religious diversity on religious studies to examples of interfaith encounter and dialogue, and current debates on Christian theology of religion. These essays examine not only the theoretical issues posed by religious pluralism to the study of religion and Christian theology but also concrete cases in which religious pluralism has been a bone of contention. Together, they open up new vistas for further conversation on the nature and development of religious pluralism.

The Jewish Christian Encounter In Medieval Preaching

Author: Jonathan Adams
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317611950
File Size: 53,36 MB
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This book explores the complexity of preaching as a phenomenon in the medieval Jewish-Christian encounter. This was not only an "encounter" as physical meeting or confrontation (such as the forced attendance of Jews at Christian sermons that took place across Europe), but also an "imaginary" or theological encounter in which Jews remained a figure from a distant constructed time and place who served only to underline and verify Christian teachings. Contributors also explore the Jewish response to Christian anti-Jewish preaching in their own preaching and religious instruction.

The Talmud Yerushalmi And Graeco Roman Culture

Author: Peter Schäfer
Editor: Mohr Siebeck
ISBN: 9783161472442
File Size: 37,21 MB
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This volume continues the studies on the most important source of late antique Judaism, the Talmud Yerushalmi, in relation to its cultural context. The text of the Talmud is juxtaposed to archaeological findings, Roman law, and contemporary classical authors. The attitude of the Rabbis towards main aspects of urban society in the Mediterranean region of late antiquity is discussed. Hereby Rabbinic Judaism is seen as integrated in the cultural currents prevalent in the eastern part of the Roman Empire. From reviews of the first volume: The essays in this volume do not seek to establish a global approach to the task, or any general methodological principles. Caution is everywhere apparent. ... This is an excellent beginning, and more is promised. It would be good if this initiative prompted more Talmudic scholars to take the Greek background of Palestinian rabbinism seriously, and finally put paid to the tendency to consider it as in some way separated from or in conflict with late antique Hellenism.N.R.M. De Lange in Bulletin of Judaeo-Greek Studies Winter 1998/99, no. 23, p. 24

The Journal Of Jewish Studies

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ISBN:
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Europe And The Middle Ages

Author: Edward Peters
Editor: Prentice Hall
ISBN:
File Size: 12,88 MB
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This comprehensive, well-balanced historical survey of medieval Europe—from Roman imperial provinces to the Renaissance—covers all aspects of the history (political, literary, religious, intellectual, etc.) with a focus on social and political themes. It presents a complete picture of the complex process by which an ecumenical civilization that once ringed the basin of the Mediterranean Sea, evolved into three other distinctive civilizations—Latin Europe, Greek Eastern Europe and Asia Minor, and Islam. A six-part organization outlines late Mediterranean antiquity and early northern Europe; two heirs of the ancient world; the early Middle Ages; Christendom: authority and enterprise, 950-1100; culture and society in the high Middle Ages, 1100-1325; and Christendom and Europe, 1325-1519. For anyone interested in the history of Europe and the Middle Ages.

Recent Acquisitions

Author: Ohio State University. College of Law. Library
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 23,42 MB
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Jewish Conversion From The Sixth Through The Twelfth Century

Author: Jessie Sherwood
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 15,43 MB
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Conversions between Judaism and Christianity were rare during much of the Middle Ages, yet they were an important facet of relations between Jews and Christians. This dissertation examines the changing dynamics of Jewish conversion from the sixth through the twelfth century. Among the issues under discussion are forcible baptism, religious identity, returning converts and converts' ability to integrate into Christian society, and also analyzes converts' texts. This thesis makes three, related arguments. It postulates that religious identity remained plastic throughout the early Middle Ages, allowing converts to integrate into their new communities, but became more rigid after the late eleventh century. Secondly, it argues that Christian attitudes toward converts, who returned to Judaism grew less tolerant during the twelfth century. Thirdly, it asserts that using coercion to baptize Jews during the tenth and eleventh centuries became more acceptable in the tenth and eleventh centuries. Where possible it also explores converts' experiences of and explanations for conversion in the context of these changes, arguing that there is often a gap between converts' accounts and Christian expectations. The first chapter studies the precedents left from the early Middle Ages by surveying the legislation governing and the early accounts of conversion. The second chapter investigates the plasticity of religious identity in the tenth and eleventh centuries by examining the extant references to converts, while the third chapter deals with the accounts of compulsory baptism from the tenth and eleventh century. The fourth chapter surveys twelfth-century converts, and the expectations of them articulated in Christian conversion stories. The fifth chapter turns to the texts left by three twelfth-century converts and their understandings of conversion. The sixth chapter addresses the question of adolescent conversion, revising the current assumption that most Jewish converts were adolescent males. Finally the seventh chapter examines the changing attitudes toward and treatment of Jewish converts and returning converts in the twelfth century.

Jewish Political Studies Review

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Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 43,14 MB
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Vengeance In Medieval Europe

Author: Daniel Lord Smail
Editor: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442601264
File Size: 64,21 MB
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How did medieval society deal with private justice, with grudges, and with violent emotions? This ground-breaking reader collects for the first time a number of unpublished or difficult-to-find texts that address violence and emotion in the Middle Ages. The sources collected here illustrate the power and reach of the language of vengeance in medieval European society. They span the early, high, and later middle ages, and capture a range of perspectives including legal sources, learned commentaries, narratives, and documents of practice. Though social elites necessarily figure prominently in all medieval sources, sources concerning relatively low-status individuals and sources pertaining to women are included. The sources range from saints' lives that illustrate the idea of vengeance to later medieval court records concerning vengeful practices. A secondary goal of the collection is to illustrate the prominence of mechanisms for peacemaking in medieval European society. The introduction traces recent scholarly developments in the study of vengeance and discusses the significance of these concepts for medieval political and social history.