Acadian Legends And Lyrics

Author: Arthur Wentworth Hamilton Eaton
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Legends And Lyrics

Author: Adelaide Anne Procter
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Size: 16,84 MB
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Legends And Lyrics A Book Of Verses

Author: Adelaide Anne Procter
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Size: 10,55 MB
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Legends And Lyrics

Author: Paul Hamilton Hayne
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Size: 11,48 MB
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Irish Legends And Lyrics With Poems Of The Imagination And Fancy

Author: Denis Florence MacCarthy
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Size: 18,13 MB
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Lays Legends And Lyrics

Author: William Jackson Bosomworth
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Size: 18,90 MB
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Plant Lore Legends And Lyrics Embracing The Myths Traditions Superstitions And Folk Lore Of The Plant Kingdom

Author: Richard Folkard
Editor: Library of Alexandria
ISBN: 1465604588
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THE analogy existing between the vegetable and animal worlds, and the resemblances between human and tree life, have been observed by man from the most remote periods of which we have any records. Primitive man, watching the marvellous changes in trees and plants, which accurately marked not only the seasons of the year, but even the periods of time in a day, could not fail to be struck with a feeling of awe at the mysterious invisible power which silently guided such wondrous and incomprehensible operations. Hence it is not astonishing that the early inhabitants of the earth should have invested with supernatural attributes the tree, which in the gloom and chill of Winter stood gaunt, bare, and sterile, but in the early Spring hastened to greet the welcome warmth-giving Sun by investing itself with a brilliant canopy of verdure, and in the scorching heat of Summer afforded a refreshing shade beneath its leafy boughs. So we find these men of old, who had learnt to reverence the mysteries of vegetation, forming conceptions of vast cosmogonic world- or cloud-trees overshadowing the universe; mystically typifying creation and regeneration, and yielding the divine ambrosia or food of immortality, the refreshing and life-inspiring rain, and the mystic fruit which imparted knowledge and wisdom to those who partook of it. So, again, we find these nebulous overspreading world-trees connected with the mysteries of death, and giving shelter to the souls of the departed in the solemn shade of their dense foliage. Looking upon vegetation as symbolical of life and generation, man, in course of time, connected the origin of his species with these shadowy cloud-trees, and hence arose the belief that humankind first sprang from Ash and Oak-trees, or derived their being from Holda, the cloud-goddess who combined in her person the form of a lovely woman and the trunk of a mighty tree. In after years trees were almost universally regarded either as sentient beings or as constituting the abiding places of spirits whose existence was bound up in the lives of the trees they inhabited. Hence arose the conceptions of Hamadryads, Dryads, Sylvans, Tree-nymphs, Elves, Fairies, and other beneficent spirits who peopled forests and dwelt in individual trees—not only in the Old World, but in the dense woods of North America, where the Mik-amwes, like Puck, has from time immemorial frolicked by moonlight in the forest openings. Hence, also, sprang up the morbid notion of trees being haunted by demons, mischievous imps, ghosts, nats, and evil spirits, whom it was deemed by the ignorant and superstitious necessary to propitiate by sacrifices, offerings, and mysterious rites and dances. Remnants of this superstitious tree-worship are still extant in some European countries. The Irminsul of the Germans and the Central Oak of the Druids were of the same family as the Asherah of the Semitic nations. In England, this primeval superstition has its descendants in the village maypole bedizened with ribbons and flowers, and the Jack-in-the-Green with its attendant devotees and whirling dancers. The modern Christmas-tree, too, although but slightly known in Germany at the beginning of the present century, is evidently a remnant of the pagan tree-worship; and it is somewhat remarkable that a similar tree is common among the Burmese, who call it the Padaytha-bin. This Turanian Christmas-tree is made by the inhabitants of towns, who deck its Bamboo twigs with all sorts of presents, and pile its roots with blankets, cloth, earthenware, and other useful articles.

Legends And Lyrics Second Series

Author: Adelaide Anne Procter
Editor: Book Jungle
ISBN: 9781438513409
Size: 11,48 MB
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Adelaide Anne Procter was a 19th century British poet. In 1951 she became a Catholic writing hymns The Lost Chord, I do not ask, O Lord, that Life may be, and My God, and I Thank Thee Who Hast Made. Procter was also very involved in social causes effecting women. Legends and Lyrics is a collection of her poems which first appeared in Household Words edited by Charles Dickens. Her poems are written with simplicity, which reflect a time when earnest expressions of a good and beneficial life were valued. Among the best known of her poems are "The Angel's Story," "The Legend of Bregenz," and "The Legend of Provence."

Plant Lore Legends And Lyrics

Author: Richard Folkard
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Size: 14,84 MB
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Legends And Lyrics And Other Poems

Author: Adelaide Anne Procter
Editor:
ISBN: 9781436530026
Size: 19,17 MB
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This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.