London In Cinema

Author: Charlotte Brunsdon
Editor: British Film Inst
ISBN:
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Charlotte Brunsdon's illuminating study explores the variety of cinematic 'Londons' that appear in films made since 1945. Brunsdon traces the familiar ways that film-makers establish that a film is set in London, by use of recognisable landmarks and the city's shorthand iconography of red buses and black taxis, as well as the ways in which these icons are avoided. She looks at London weather – fog and rain – and everyday locations like the pub and the housing estate, while also examining the recurring patterns of representation associated with films set in the East and West Ends of London, from Spring in Park Lane (1948) to Mona Lisa (1986), and from Night and the City (1950) to From Hell (2001). Brunsdon provides a detailed analysis of a selection of films, exploring their contribution to the cinematic geography of London, and showing the ways in which feature films have responded to, and created, changing views of the city. She traces London's transformation from imperial capital to global city through the different ways in which the local is imagined in films ranging from Ealing comedies to Pressure (1974), as well as through the shifting imagery of the River Thames and the Docks. She addresses the role of cinematic genres such as horror and film noir in the constitution of the cinematic city, as well as the recurrence of figures such as the cockney, the gangster and the housewife. Challenging the view that London is not a particularly cinematic city, Brunsdon demonstrates that many London-set films offer their own meditation on the complex relationships between the cinema and the city.
London in Cinema
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Charlotte Brunsdon
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-07-25 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

Charlotte Brunsdon's illuminating study explores the variety of cinematic 'Londons' that appear in films made since 1945. Brunsdon traces the familiar ways that film-makers establish that a film is set in London, by use of recognisable landmarks and the city's shorthand iconography of red buses and black taxis, as well
London on Film
Language: en
Pages: 257
Authors: Pam Hirsch, Chris O'Rourke
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-10-26 - Publisher: Springer

This book, a collection of essays by expert film researchers and lecturers, contributes to the growing body of scholarship on cinematic cities by looking at how one city—London—has been represented on film. In particular, the collection examines how films about London have responded to social, material and political change in
Pictorialism in Cinema
Language: en
Pages: 430
Authors: Jarmo Valkola
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-09-23 - Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This book explores the unique phenomenon of pictorialism and its connection with other arts in film and media studies. Pictorialism is motivated by the commitment to develop and increase the function and effectiveness of images, sounds, and performances that aesthetically formulate, translate, and change the effects of contemporary cinema to
Jack the Ripper in Film and Culture
Language: en
Pages: 211
Authors: Clare Smith
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-08-29 - Publisher: Springer

In 1888 the name Jack the Ripper entered public consciousness with the brutal murders of women in the East End of London. The murderer was never caught, yet film and television depicts a killer with a recognisable costume, motive and persona. This book examines the origins of the screen presentation
Cinema and Brexit
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Neil Archer
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-09-03 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

Neil Archer's original study makes a timely and politically-engaged intervention in debates about national cinema and national identity. Structured around key examples of 'culturally English cinema' in the years up to and following the UK's 2016 vote to leave the European Union, Cinema and Brexit looks to make sense of