Mexican Origin Foods Foodways And Social Movements

Author: Devon Peña
Editor: University of Arkansas Press
ISBN: 1682260364
File Size: 21,42 MB
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This collection of new essays offers groundbreaking perspectives on the ways that food and foodways serve as an element of decolonization in Mexican-origin communities. The writers here take us from multigenerational acequia farmers, who trace their ancestry to Indigenous families in place well before the Oñate Entrada of 1598, to tomorrow’s transborder travelers who will be negotiating entry into the United States. Throughout, we witness the shifting mosaic of Mexican-origin foods and foodways in the fields, gardens, and kitchen tables from Chiapas to Alaska. Global food systems are also considered from a critical agroecological perspective, including the ways colonialism affects native biocultural diversity, ecosystem resilience, and equality across species, human groups, and generations. Mexican-Origin Foods, Foodways, and Social Movements is a major contribution to the understanding of the ways that Mexican-origin peoples have resisted and transformed food systems. It will animate scholarship on global food studies for years to come.

Made In Baja

Author: Christian Zlolniski
Editor: University of California Press
ISBN: 0520300629
File Size: 77,90 MB
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Much of the produce that Americans eat is grown in the Mexican state of Baja California, the site of a multibillion-dollar export agricultural boom that has generated jobs and purportedly reduced poverty and labor migration to the United States. But how has this growth affected those living in Baja? Based on a decade of ethnographic fieldwork, Made in Baja examines the unforeseen consequences for residents in the region of San Quintín. The ramifications include the tripling of the region’s population, mushrooming precarious colonia communities lacking basic infrastructure and services, and turbulent struggles for labor, civic, and political rights. Anthropologist Christian Zlolniski reveals the outcomes of growers structuring the industry around an insatiable demand for fresh fruits and vegetables. He also investigates the ecological damage—"watercide”—and the social side effects of exploiting natural resources for agricultural production. Weaving together stories from both farmworkers and growers, Made in Baja provides an eye-opening look at the dynamic economy developing south of the border.

The Immigrant Food Nexus

Author: Julian Agyeman
Editor:
ISBN: 0262538415
File Size: 23,63 MB
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"This book investigates the intersection of food and immigration in North America through a novel construct: the immigrant-food nexus. To do this, the book's chapters delve into three overarching areas in which immigration and food intersect from the national level down to the daily lived experience of immigrants: Boundaries: Individuals, Communities, and Nations, Labor: Fields and Bodies, and Identity Narratives and Identity Politics. In taking a critical approach towards questions of food, agricultural and immigration policy, the volume's contributors ask: How can the immigrant-food nexus be understood in our current political climate of rising nationalism, and how does an analysis that transcends traditional "micro" or "macro" scales from the nation to the community to the body provide a new way to think about these issues? The contributors synthesize this analysis of "macro" topics within immigration and food with a "micro" analysis of immigrant foodways. Foodways are manifestations and symbols of cultural histories and proclivities. As individuals participate in culturally defined ways of eating, they perform their own identities and memberships in particular groups. How important are foodways as performances, on immigrant lived and daily practices? The concepts defined as "macro" have real, embodied consequences. The concepts defined as "micro" have large-scale, important meanings. The contributors recognize this: their work bridges the scales of the nation, community, and individual bodies to "render visible the political tensions about race, agriculture, immigration, and the future of the nation that simmer in everyday life" (Neubert, Chapter 2). Through critical, multidimensional research, critical food and immigration scholars today find themselves at a generative place to bring fact-based, humanized, and multi-scalar narratives of the immigrant-food nexus to light. The uniqueness of this book lies in the concept of the immigrant-food nexus as a lens for exploring immigration and food in North America. This fulfills a special need: to complicate the binary of macro level policy, and micro level lived experience, showing the intersections between these scales"--

A Recipe For Gentrification

Author: Alison Hope Alkon
Editor: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479834432
File Size: 13,80 MB
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How gentrification uproots the urban food landscape, and what activists are doing to resist it From hipster coffee shops to upscale restaurants, a bustling local food scene is perhaps the most commonly recognized harbinger of gentrification. A Recipe for Gentrification explores this widespread phenomenon, showing the ways in which food and gentrification are deeply—and, at times, controversially—intertwined. Contributors provide an inside look at gentrification in different cities, from major hubs like New York and Los Angeles to smaller cities like Cleveland and Durham. They examine a wide range of food enterprises—including grocery stores, restaurants, community gardens, and farmers’ markets—to provide up-to-date perspectives on why gentrification takes place, and how communities use food to push back against displacement. Ultimately, they unpack the consequences for vulnerable people and neighborhoods. A Recipe for Gentrification highlights how the everyday practices of growing, purchasing and eating food reflect the rapid—and contentious—changes taking place in American cities in the twenty-first century.

To Feast On Us As Their Prey

Author: Rachel B. Herrmann
Editor: Food and Foodways
ISBN: 1682260828
File Size: 11,92 MB
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Long before the founding of the Jamestown, Virginia, colony and its Starving Time of 1609-1610--one of the most famous cannibalism narratives in North American colonial history--cannibalism, and accusations of cannibalism, played an important role in the history of food, hunger, and moral outrage. Why did colonial invaders go out of their way to accuse women of cannibalism? What challenges did Spaniards face in trying to explain Eucharist rites to Native peoples? What roles did preconceived notions about non-Europeans play in inflating accounts of cannibalism in Christopher Columbus's reports as they moved through Italian merchant circles? Asking questions such as these and exploring what it meant to accuse someone of eating people as well as how cannibalism rumors facilitated slavery and the rise of empires, To Feast on Us as Their Prey posits that it is impossible to separate histories of cannibalism from the role food and hunger have played in the colonization efforts that shaped our modern world.

Sociological Abstracts

Author: Leo P. Chall
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 13,60 MB
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CSA Sociological Abstracts abstracts and indexes the international literature in sociology and related disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. The database provides abstracts of journal articles and citations to book reviews drawn from over 1,800+ serials publications, and also provides abstracts of books, book chapters, dissertations, and conference papers.

Encyclopedia Of Rural America N Z

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File Size: 50,52 MB
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History, sociology, anthropology, and public policy are combined to deliver the encyclopedia destined to become the standard reference work in American rural studies. From irrigation and marriage to games and mental health, this encyclopedia is the first to explore the contemporary landscape of rural America, placed in historical perspective. With over 300 articles prepared by leading experts from across the nation, this timely encyclopedia documents and explains the major themes, concepts, industries, concerns, and everyday life of the people and land who make up rural America. Entries range from the industrial sector and government policy to arts and humanities and social and family concerns. Articles explore every aspect of life in rural America. Encyclopedia of Rural America, with its broad range of coverage, will appeal to high school and college students as well as graduate students, faculty, scholars, and people whose work pertains to rural areas. - Publisher.

Choice

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Anthropology Newsletter

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File Size: 47,89 MB
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Abstracts Of The Annual Meeting

Author: American Anthropological Association
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File Size: 47,78 MB
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Dissertation Abstracts International

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America History And Life

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File Size: 46,17 MB
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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

International Books In Print

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Books In Print

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Books In Print 2004 2005

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ISBN: 9780835246491
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American Doctoral Dissertations

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