Nature And Culture In The Early Modern Atlantic

Author: Peter C. Mancall
Editor: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812249666
File Size: 21,18 MB
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Nature and Culture in the Early Modern Atlantic reveals how Europeans and Native Americans devised ways to understand the environment. Drawing on paintings, oral history, early printed books, and other cultural artifacts, Peter C. Mancall argues that human understanding of nature played a central role in the emergence of the modern world.

Translating Nature

Author: Jaime Marroquin Arredondo
Editor: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812250931
File Size: 54,97 MB
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Translating Nature recasts the era of early modern science as an age not of discovery but of translation. As Iberian and Protestant empires expanded across the Americas, colonial travelers encountered, translated, and reinterpreted Amerindian traditions of knowledge—knowledge that was later translated by the British, reading from Spanish and Portuguese texts. Translations of natural and ethnographic knowledge therefore took place across multiple boundaries—linguistic, cultural, and geographical—and produced, through their transmissions, the discoveries that characterize the early modern era. In the process, however, the identities of many of the original bearers of knowledge were lost or hidden in translation. The essays in Translating Nature explore the crucial role that the translation of philosophical and epistemological ideas played in European scientific exchanges with American Indians; the ethnographic practices and methods that facilitated appropriation of Amerindian knowledge; the ideas and practices used to record, organize, translate, and conceptualize Amerindian naturalist knowledge; and the persistent presence and influence of Amerindian and Iberian naturalist and medical knowledge in the development of early modern natural history. Contributors highlight the global nature of the history of science, the mobility of knowledge in the early modern era, and the foundational roles that Native Americans, Africans, and European Catholics played in this age of translation. Contributors: Ralph Bauer, Daniela Bleichmar, William Eamon, Ruth Hill, Jaime Marroquín Arredondo, Sara Miglietti, Luis Millones Figueroa, Marcy Norton, Christopher Parsons, Juan Pimentel, Sarah Rivett, John Slater.

Literature And Moral Economy In The Early Modern Atlantic

Author: Hillary Eklund
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317104447
File Size: 62,53 MB
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Grounded in the literary history of early modern England, this study explores the intersection of cultural attitudes and material practices that shape the acquisition, circulation, and consumption of resources at the turn of the seventeenth century. Considering a formally diverse and ideologically rich array of texts from the period - including drama, poetry, and prose, as well as travel narrative and early modern political and literary theory - this book shows how ideas about what is considered 'enough' adapt to changing material conditions and how cultural forces shape those adaptations. Literature and Moral Economy in the Early Modern Atlantic traces how early modern English authors improvised new models of sufficiency that pushed back the threshold of excess to the frontier of the known world itself. The book argues that standards of economic sufficiency as expressed through literature moved from subsistence toward the increasing pursuit of plenty through plunder, trade, and plantation. Author Hillary Eklund describes what it means to have enough in the moral economies of eating, travel, trade, land use and public policy.

Firsting In The Early Modern Atlantic World

Author: Lauren Beck
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1000228037
File Size: 26,67 MB
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For centuries, historians have narrated the arrival of Europeans using terminology (discovery, invasion, conquest, and colonization) that emphasizes their agency and disempowers that of Native Americans. This book explores firsting, a discourse that privileges European and settler-colonial presence, movements, knowledges, and experiences as a technology of colonization in the early modern Atlantic world, 1492-1900. It exposes how textual culture has ensured that Euro-settlers dominate Native Americans, while detailing misrepresentations of Indigenous peoples as unmodern and proposing how the western world can be un-firsted in scholarship on this time and place.

South Atlantic Review

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 41,22 MB
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Mining Money And Markets In The Early Modern Atlantic

Author: Renate Pieper
Editor: Springer Nature
ISBN: 3030238946
File Size: 10,24 MB
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This volume documents recent efforts to track the transformation and trajectory of silver during the early modern period, from its origins in ores located on either side of the Atlantic to its use as currency in the financial centres of continental Europe. As a point of comparison, copper mining and its monetary use in the early modern Atlantic World will also be considered. Contributors rely mainly on economic and economic history methodologies, complemented by geographical and cultural history approaches. The use of novel software applications as tools to explain economic-historical episodes is also detailed.

Political Culture And Cultural Politics In Early Modern England

Author: David Underdown
Editor: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 9780719046957
File Size: 40,43 MB
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Combining the work of major scholars on both sides of the Atlantic this volume seeks to explore the interconnections between popular culture and political activism at both the local and central levels. Strongly influenced by the work of David Underdown, the contributions range across a spectrum of social and political history from witchcraft to the aristocracy, from forest riots to battles of the civil war. The volume combines chapters from historians of gender, of political theory, of social structure, and of high politics. Within this diversity, the contributors offer a cohesive approach to the study of early modern England, encouraging the exploration of mentalities and political activities, as well as artistic rendering, writing and ceremony within the widest context of cultural politics.

The William And Mary Quarterly

Author: Richard Lee Morton
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 29,57 MB
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Bridging The Early Modern Atlantic World

Author: Dr Caroline A Williams
Editor: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409480372
File Size: 61,96 MB
Format: PDF
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Bridging the Early Modern Atlantic World brings together ten original essays by an international group of scholars exploring the complex outcomes of the intermingling of people, circulation of goods, exchange of information, and exposure to new ideas that are the hallmark of the early modern Atlantic. Spanning the period from the earliest French crossings to Newfoundland at the beginning of the sixteenth century to the end of the wars of independence in Spanish South America, c. 1830, and encompassing a range of disciplinary approaches, the contributors direct particular attention to regions, communities, and groups whose activities in, and responses to, an ever-more closely bound Atlantic world remain relatively under-represented in the literature. Some of the chapters focus on the experience of Europeans, including French consumers of Newfoundland cod, English merchants forming families in Spanish Seville, and Jewish refugees from Dutch Brazil making the Caribbean island of Nevis their home. Others focus on the ways in which the populations with whom Europeans came into contact, enslaved, or among whom they settled - the Tupi peoples of Brazil, the Kriston women of the west African port of Cacheu, among others - adapted to and were changed by their interactions with previously unknown peoples, goods, institutions, and ideas. Together with the substantial Introduction by the editor which reviews the significance of the field as a whole, these essays capture the complexity and variety of experience of the countless men and women who came into contact during the period, whilst highlighting and illustrating the porous and fluid nature, in practice, of the early modern Atlantic world.

The Transformation Of The North Atlantic World 1492 1763

Author: Michael J. Seymour
Editor: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275973803
File Size: 59,96 MB
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Details how a century of virtual Iberian monopoly in Atlantic empire became displaced by an Anglophone hegemony by 1763.

Jews And Blacks In The Early Modern Mediterranean And Atlantic Worlds 1450 1800

Author: Jonathan Schorsch
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 18,44 MB
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Old Worlds New Worlds

Author: Lisa Bailey
Editor: Brepols Pub
ISBN:
File Size: 77,82 MB
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Pre-modern European history is replete with moments of encounter. At the end of arduous sea and land journeys, and en route, Europeans met people who challenged their assumptions and certainties about the world. Some sought riches, others allies; some looked for Christian converts and some aimed for conquest. Others experienced the forced cultural encounter of exile. Many travelled only in imagination, forming ideas which have become foundational to modern mentalities: race, ethnicity, nation, and the nature of humanity. The consequences were profound: both productive and destructive. At the beginning of the third millennium CE we occupy a world shaped by those centuries of travel and encounter. This collection examines key themes and moments in European cultural expansion. Unlike many studies it spans both the medieval and early modern periods, challenging the stereotype of the post-Columbus 'age of discovery'. There is room too for examining cross-cultural relationships within Europe and regions closely linked to it, to show that curiosity, conflict and transformation could result from such meetings as they did in more far-flung realms. Several essays deal with authors, events, and ideas which will be unfamiliar to most readers but which deserve greater attention in the history of encounter and exploration.

Early American Literature

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 56,82 MB
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Merchants And Marvels

Author: Pamela H. Smith
Editor: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415928151
File Size: 32,13 MB
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The beginning of global commerce in the early modern period had an enormous impact on European culture, changing the very way people perceived the world around them. Merchants and Marvels assembles essays by leading scholars of cultural history, art history, and the history of science and technology to show how ideas about the representation of nature, in both art and science, underwent a profound transformation between the age of the Renaissance and the early 1700s.

Economies Of Literature And Knowledge In Early Modern Europe

Author: Subha Mukherji
Editor: Springer Nature
ISBN: 3030376516
File Size: 56,24 MB
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Colonial Botany

Author: Londa Schiebinger
Editor: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812293479
File Size: 50,23 MB
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In the early modern world, botany was big science and big business, critical to Europe's national and trade ambitions. Tracing the dynamic relationships among plants, peoples, states, and economies over the course of three centuries, this collection of essays offers a lively challenge to a historiography that has emphasized the rise of modern botany as a story of taxonomies and "pure" systems of classification. Charting a new map of botany along colonial coordinates, reaching from Europe to the New World, India, Asia, and other points on the globe, Colonial Botany explores how the study, naming, cultivation, and marketing of rare and beautiful plants resulted from and shaped European voyages, conquests, global trade, and scientific exploration. From the earliest voyages of discovery, naturalists sought profitable plants for king and country, personal and corporate gain. Costly spices and valuable medicinal plants such as nutmeg, tobacco, sugar, Peruvian bark, peppers, cloves, cinnamon, and tea ranked prominently among the motivations for European voyages of discovery. At the same time, colonial profits depended largely on natural historical exploration and the precise identification and effective cultivation of profitable plants. This volume breaks new ground by treating the development of the science of botany in its colonial context and situating the early modern exploration of the plant world at the volatile nexus of science, commerce, and state politics. Written by scholars as international as their subjects, Colonial Botany uncovers an emerging cultural history of plants and botanical practices in Europe and its possessions.