Notes On The Cinematograph

Author: Robert Bresson
Editor: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1681370255
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The French film director Robert Bresson was one of the great artists of the twentieth century and among the most radical, original, and radiant stylists of any time. He worked with nonprofessional actors—models, as he called them—and deployed a starkly limited but hypnotic array of sounds and images to produce such classic works as A Man Escaped, Pickpocket, Diary of a Country Priest, and Lancelot of the Lake. From the beginning to the end of his career, Bresson dedicated himself to making movies in which nothing is superfluous and everything is always at stake. Notes on the Cinematograph distills the essence of Bresson’s theory and practice as a filmmaker and artist. He discusses the fundamental differences between theater and film; parses the deep grammar of silence, music, and noise; and affirms the mysterious power of the image to unlock the human soul. This book, indispensable for admirers of this great director and for ­students of the cinema, will also prove an inspiration, much like Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet, for anyone who responds to the claims of the imagination at its most searching and rigorous.

Bresson On Bresson Interviews 1943 1983

Author: Robert Bresson
Editor: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 168137045X
Size: 17,67 MB
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Robert Bresson, the director of such cinematic master-pieces as Pickpocket, A Man Escaped Mouchette, and L’Argent, was one of the most influential directors in the history of French film, as well as one of the most stubbornly individual: He insisted on the use of nonprofessional actors; he shunned the “advances” of Cinerama and Cinema-Scope (and the work of most of his predecessors and peers); and he minced no words about the damaging influence of capitalism and the studio system on the still-developing—in his view—art of film. Bresson on Bresson collects the most significant interviews that Bresson gave (carefully editing them before they were released) over the course of his forty-year career to reveal both the internal consistency and the consistently exploratory character of his body of work. Successive chapters are dedicated to each of his fourteen films, as well as to the question of literary adaptation, the nature of the sound track, and to Bresson’s one book, the great aphoristic treatise Notes on the Cinematograph. Throughout, his close and careful consideration of his own films and of the art of film is punctuated by such telling mantras as “Sound...invented silence in cinema,” “It’s the film that...gives life to the characters—not the characters that give life to the film,” and (echoing the Bible) “Every idle word shall be counted.” Bresson’s integrity and originality earned him the admiration of younger directors from Jean-Luc Godard and Jacques Rivette to Olivier Assayas. And though Bresson’s movies are marked everywhere by an air of intense deliberation, these interviews show that they were no less inspired by a near-religious belief in the value of intuition, not only that of the creator but that of the audience, which he claims to deeply respect: “It’s always ready to feel before it understands. And that’s how it should be.

A History Of Early Film

Author: Stephen Herbert
Editor: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9780415211529
Size: 15,18 MB
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Notes On Cinematograph Management

Author: Lanternist
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 11,58 MB
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The Cinematograph Act 1952

Author:
Editor: Universal Law Publishing
ISBN:
Size: 14,54 MB
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Shoot The Notebooks Of Serafino Gubbio Cinematograph Operator

Author: Luigi Pirandello
Editor: Lulu.com
ISBN: 1471052176
Size: 15,86 MB
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The Cinema Alone

Author: Michael Temple
Editor: Amsterdam University Press
ISBN: 9789053564561
Size: 19,49 MB
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This volume of essays constitutes a comprehensive and interdisciplinary engagement with Jean-Luc Godard's current film and video work. Its key focus is the eight-part magnum opus Histoire(s) du cinma (1988-1998), an extraordinary experiment in film history that attempts to tell 'all the stories of cinema' whilst remaining true to the specificity of what 'the cinema alone' contributed to twentieth-century culture. The Cinema Alone features contributors from France, Britain and America who discuss Godard's recent work both in the context of his earlier corpus and in relation to subjects such as literature, art history, philosophy, silent cinema, European culture, film theory, video and digital technology. The collection will make an important contribution to critical debates on the past, present and future of Film and Media Studies as cinema enters its second century.

Early Cinema In Russia And Its Cultural Reception

Author: Yuri Tsivian
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 113491038X
Size: 10,76 MB
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In Early Cinema in Russia and its Cultural Reception Yuri Tsivian examines the development of cinematic form and culture in Russia, from its late nineteenth-century beginnings as a fairground attraction to the early post-Revolutionary years. Tsivian traces the changing perceptions of cinema and its social transition from a modernist invention to a national art form. He explores reactions to the earliest films, from actors, novelists, poets, writers, and journalists. His richly detailed study of the physical elements of cinematic performance includes the architecture and illumination of the cinema foyer, the speed of projection and film acoustics. In contrast to standard film histories, this book focuses on reflected images: rather than discussing films and film-makers, it features the historical film-goer and early writings on film. Early Cinema in Russia and its Cultural Reception presents a vivid and changing picture of cinema culture in Russia in the twilight of the tsarist era and the first decades of the twentieth century. Tsivian's study expands the whole context of reception studies and opens up questions about reception relevant to other national cinemas.

Reviewing Orpheus

Author: Cornelia A. Tsakiridou
Editor: Bucknell University Press
ISBN: 9780838753798
Size: 10,90 MB
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Dealing primarily with the Orphic cinema of Jean Cocteau and the theme of Orpheus in his life and in his art, this volume reveals Cocteau's relevance to current aesthetic and critical discussion. It also reveals the complexity and elusiveness of an artist who idealized classicism, embraced modernist forms, and anticipated postmodernist dilemmas without losing sight of his own creative identity and of art's unique ability to inform and enhance human life. Postmodernism's dedication to the rehabilitation of "lesser" artists and its revision of modernist history have not affected Cocteau studies even in areas of self-evident relevance like sexuality, myth, and gender. In the very few instances where these subjects have been addressed, the focus has been mainly on Cocteau's cinema, and no attempt has been made to link his cinematography to his theater, his poetry, and the many autobiographical and critical texts that reflect on his aesthetics and sensibility. The essays in this volume take the first steps in this direction with topics that include illusion, magic, and reality in the theater and film of Cocteau; the narcissistic character of his Orphism; the phenomenology of Cocteau video in hyperreal contexts; the psychoanalysis of his textual and visual language; his deconstruction of the Orphic myth; the baroque and neobaroque nature of his cinematograph; and the influence on his aesthetics and rhetoric of Italian quattrocento painting and theory. Among the works considered are, in film, The Blood of a Poet, Orpheus, The Testament of Orpheus, Beauty and the Beast, and The Eternal Return; in theater, The Wedding on the Eiffel Tower and Knights of the Round Table; in diaries and other texts, Diary of an Unknown, Letters to His Mother, the 1946 poem Crucifixion, and the 1943 essay "The Myth of El Greco."

Screen Writings

Author: Scott MacDonald
Editor: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520080256
Size: 13,67 MB
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"Ask audience to cut the part of the image on the screen that they don't like. Supply scissors."—Yoko Ono, Tokyo, June 1964 A dazzling range of unconventional film scripts and texts, many published for the first time, make up Scott MacDonald's newest collection. Illustrated with nearly 100 film stills, this fascinating book is at once a reference work of film history and an unparalleled sampling of experimental "language art." It contributes to the very dissipation of boundaries between cinematic, literary, and artistic expression thematized in the films themselves. Each text and script is introduced and contextualized by MacDonald; a filmography and a bibliography round out the volume. This is a readable—often quite funny—literature that investigates differences between seeing and reading. Represented are avant-garde classics such as Hollis Frampton's Poetic Justice and Zorns Lemma and Morgan Fisher's Standard Gauge, and William Greaves's recently rediscovered Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One. Michael Snow turns film loose on language in So Is This; Peter Rose turns language loose on theory in Pressures of the Text. Some of the most influential feminist filmscripts of recent decades—Laura Mulvey and Peter Wollen's Riddles of the Sphinx, Su Friedrich's Gently Down the Stream, Trinh T. Minh-ha's Reassemblage, Yvonne Rainer's Privilege—confirm this book's importance for readers in gender and cultural studies as well as for filmmakers and admirers of experimental writing, independent cinema, and the visual arts in general.