A Study Of The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident Process

Author: Michio Ishikawa
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 4431555439
File Size: 64,35 MB
Format: PDF
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Written by an expert in the field, this book is perfect for those who would like to know what happened at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Part 1 of the book studies how core melts occurred in Fukushima Daiichi units 1, 2, and 3, respectively, based on evidence from the Three-Mile Island core melt accident and fuel behavior experiments performed in the 1970s under the cooperation between the United States, Germany, and Japan. This information explains the accident processes without contradicting data from Fukushima, which was published in the TEPCO report. The hydrogen explosions in units 1, 3, and 4 are also explained logically in conjunction with the above core melt process. Part 2 clarifies how the background radiation level of the site doubled: The first rise was just a leak from small openings in units 1 and 3 associated with fire-pump connection work. The second rise led to direct radioactive material release from unit 2. Evacuation dose adequacy and its timing are discussed with reference to the accident process, and the necessity for embankments surrounding nuclear power plants to increase protection against natural disasters is also discussed. New proposals for safety design and emergency preparedness are suggested based on lessons learned from the accident as well as from new experiences. Finally, a concept for decommissioning the Fukushima site and a recovery plan are introduced.
A Study of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident Process
Language: en
Pages: 231
Authors: Michio Ishikawa
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-08-12 - Publisher: Springer

Written by an expert in the field, this book is perfect for those who would like to know what happened at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Part 1 of the book studies how core melts occurred in Fukushima Daiichi units 1, 2, and 3, respectively, based on evidence from
Nuclear Disaster at Fukushima Daiichi
Language: en
Pages: 222
Authors: Richard Hindmarsh
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-08-21 - Publisher: Routledge

Nuclear Disaster at Fukushima Daiichi is a timely and groundbreaking account of the disturbing landscape of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown amidst an earthquake and tsunami on Japan’s northeast coastline on March 11, 2011. It provides riveting insights into the social and political landscape of nuclear power development in Japan,
The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Disaster
Language: en
Pages: 298
Authors: The Independent Investigation on the Fukushima Nuclear Accident
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-03-05 - Publisher: Routledge

When the Nuclear Safety Commission in Japan reviewed safety-design guidelines for nuclear plants in 1990, the regulatory agency explicitly ruled out the need to consider prolonged AC power loss. In other words, nothing like the catastrophe at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station was possible—no tsunami of 45 feet could
The Fukushima Effect
Language: en
Pages: 312
Authors: Richard Hindmarsh, Rebecca Priestley
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-12-07 - Publisher: Routledge

The Fukushima Effect offers a range of scholarly perspectives on the international effect of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown four years out from the disaster. Grounded in the field of science, technology and society (STS) studies, a leading cast of international scholars from the Asia-Pacific, Europe, and the United States
My Nuclear Nightmare
Language: en
Pages: 200
Authors: Naoto Kan
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-01-10 - Publisher: Cornell University Press

"Naoto Kan, who was prime minister of Japan when the March 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster began, has become a ubiquitous and compelling voice for the global antinuclear movement. Kan compared the potential worst-case devastation that could be caused by a nuclear power plant meltdown as tantamount only to ‘a great