One Hundred Demons

Author: Lynda Barry
Editor: Sasquatch Books
ISBN: 1570613370
Size: 15,89 MB
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A collection of twenty comic strips celebrates the Buddhist challenge to overcome one hundred demons in a lifetime with such offerings as "Dancing," "Dogs," and "Magic," which follow the author's misadventures with adolescence, family, and relationships.

One Hundred Demons

Author: Lynda Barry
Editor: Drawn and Quarterly
ISBN: 9781770462779
Size: 20,55 MB
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“You’ll wonder how anything can be so sad and so funny at the same time.” —Lev Grossman, Time Inspired by a sixteenth-century Zen monk’s painting of a hundred demons chasing each other across a long scroll, acclaimed cartoonist Lynda Barry confronts various demons from her life in seventeen full-color vignettes. In Barry’s hand, demons are the life moments that haunt you, form you, and stay with you: your worst boyfriend; kickball games on a warm summer night; watching your baby brother dance; the smell of various houses in the neighborhood you grew up in; or the day you realize your childhood is long behind you and you are officially a teenager. As a cartoonist, Lynda Barry has the innate ability to zero in on the essence of truth, a magical quality that has made her book One! Hundred! Demons! an enduring classic of the early twenty-first century. In the book’s intro, however, Barry throws the idea of truth out of the window by asking the reader to decide if fiction can have truth and if autobiography can have a fiction, a hybrid that Barry coins “autobiofictionalography.” As readers get to know Barry’s demons, they realize that the actual truth no longer matters because the universality of Barry’s comics, true or untrue, reigns supreme.

The Night Parade Of One Hundred Demons

Author: Matthew Meyer
Editor:
ISBN: 9780985218423
Size: 11,73 MB
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From the mists of prehistory to the present day, Japan has always had stories of fantastic monsters. There are women with extra mouths in the backs of their heads, water goblins whose favorite food is inside the human anus, elephant-dragons which feed solely on bad dreams, baby zombies, talking foxes, fire-breathing chickens, animated blobs of rotten flesh that run about the streets at night, and the dreaded "hyakki yagyo" "the night parade of one hundred demons"-when all of the yokai leave their homes and parade through the streets of Japan in one massive spectacle of utter pandemonium. What are yokai? Put simply, they are supernatural creatures of Japanese folklore. The word in Japanese is a combination of "yo," meaning "bewitching," and "kai," meaning "strange." The term encompasses monsters, demons, gods ("kami"), ghosts ("bakemono"), magical animals, transformed humans, urban legends, and other strange phenomena. It is a broad and vague term. Nothing exists in the English language that quite does the trick of capturing the essence of yokai. This field guide contains over 100 illustrated entries covering a wide variety of Japanese yokai. Each yokai is described in detail-including its habitat, diet, origin, and legends-based on translations from centuries-old Japanese texts. This book was first funded on Kickstarter in 2011 and then revised in 2015.

One Hundred Demons And One Hundred Supernatural Tales

Author: Midori Deguchi
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 12,16 MB
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Anime And Its Roots In Early Japanese Monster Art

Author: Zília Papp
Editor: Global Oriental
ISBN: 9004202870
Size: 10,52 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Japanese anime plays a major role in modern popular visual culture and aesthetics, yet this is the first study which sets out to put today’s anime in historical context by tracking the visual links between Edo- and Meiji- period painters and the post-war period animation and manga series ‘Gegegeno Kitaro’ by Mizuki Shigeru.

Invitation To Possibility Land

Author: Bob Bertolino
Editor: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780876308752
Size: 17,17 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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It offers the reader a chance to experience, along with the participants, an in depth training where subjects such as hypnosis, brief, Ericksonian, solution-oriented, and narrative therapies, and the use of language, are explored.

The Art Of War For Zombies

Author: Sun Tzumbie
Editor: Peter Pauper Press, Inc.
ISBN: 1441307184
Size: 13,95 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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They walk among us: The Living. They seek to vanquish us. And we bite back. Still, every Zombie needs support. Now an ancient military manual reveals the secrets that will keep Undead Comrades from losing their heads as they learn to assess the Enemy and develop offensive strategy (an easy task for those of the decaying flesh). It all starts by declaring one word: WAR! (And take note: The Apocalypse will not be televised.) 144 pages. A hilarious mash-up of the ancient Sun-Tzu classic The Art of War with Zombie, er, components. Illustrator Bruce Waldman has been teaching at the School of Visual Arts for more than 25 years, is a member of the Board of Governors of the Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop, and a Director of The New York Society of Etchers. His prints are in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The Royal Collection, London, The Library of Congress, Washington DC, and other museums. Endsheet cartography by David Lindroth. Additional historical art image reproductions.

Growing Up Asian American In Young Adult Fiction

Author: Ymitri Mathison
Editor: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1496815092
Size: 20,10 MB
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Contributions by Hena Ahmad, Linda Pierce Allen, Mary J. Henderson Couzelis, Sarah Park Dahlen, Lan Dong, Tomo Hattori, Jennifer Ho, Ymitri Mathison, Leah Milne, Joy Takako Taylor, and Traise Yamamoto Often referred to as the model minority, Asian American children and adolescents feel pressured to perform academically and be disinterested in sports, with the exception of martial arts. Boys are often stereotyped as physically unattractive nerds and girls as petite and beautiful. Many Americans remain unaware of the diversity of ethnicities and races the term Asian American comprises, with Asian American adolescents proving to be more invisible than adults. As a result, Asian American adolescents are continually searching for their identity and own place in American society. For these kids, being or considered to be American becomes a challenge in itself as they assert their Asian and American identities; claim their own ethnic identity, be they immigrant or American-born; and negotiate their ethnic communities. The contributors to Growing Up Asian American in Young Adult Fiction focus on moving beyond stereotypes to examine how Asian American children and adolescents define their unique identities. Chapters focus on primary texts from many ethnicities, such as Chinese, Korean, Filipino, Japanese, Vietnamese, South Asian, and Hawaiian. Individual chapters, crossing cultural, linguistic, and racial boundaries, negotiate the complex terrain of Asian American children's and teenagers" identities. Chapters cover such topics as internalized racism and self-loathing; hyper-sexualization of Asian American females in graphic novels; interracial friendships; transnational adoptions and birth searches; food as a means of assimilation and resistance; commodity racism and the tourist gaze; the hostile and alienating environment generated by the War on Terror; and many other topics.

Graphic Girlhoods

Author: Elizabeth Marshall
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1351606816
Size: 11,98 MB
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Drawing on a dynamic set of "graphic texts of girlhood," Elizabeth Marshall identifies the locations, cultural practices, and representational strategies through which schoolgirls experience real and metaphorical violence. How is the schoolgirl made legible through violence in graphic texts of girlhood? What knowledge about girlhood and violence are under erasure within mainstream images and scripts about the schoolgirl? In what ways has the schoolgirl been pictured in graphic narratives to communicate feminist knowledge, represent trauma, and/or testify about social violence? Graphic Girlhoods focuses on these questions to make visible and ultimately question how sexism, racism and other forms of structural violence inform education and girlhood. From picture books about mean girls The Recess Queen or graphic novels like Jane, The Fox and Me to Ronald Searle's ghastly pupils in the St. Trinian's cartoons to graphic memoirs about schooling by adult women, such as Ruby Bridges's Through My Eyes and Lynda Barry's One Hundred Demons texts for and about the schoolgirl stake a claim in ongoing debates about gender and education.

Insomnia

Author: Eluned Summers-Bremner
Editor: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 186189564X
Size: 19,83 MB
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This cultural, historical, and scientific exploration of sleeplessness by Eluned Summers-Bremner begins with the literature of ancient times, and finds its sufferers in prominent texts such as the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Mesopotamian epic Gilgamesh, and the Bible. Moving to Romantic and Gothic literature, she shows how sleeplessness continued to play a large role as the advent of street lighting in the nineteenth century inspired the fantastical blurring of daytime reality and night visions and authors connected insomnia to the ephemeral worlds of nightmares and the sublime. Meanwhile, throughout the ages insomnia has been variously categorized by the medical community as a manifestation of a deeper psychological or physical malady. Today’s medical solutions tend to involve prescription drugs—but, as Insomnia reveals, important questions linger about the role of the pharmaceutical industry and the effectiveness of such treatments. “Summers-Bremner’s account of literary usages of insomnia, from Gilgamesh to Garcia Márquez, is a rich one, sufficient to make the case that insomnia is a recurrent theme in Western culture.”––Wall Street Journal “A whimsical tour of the history of how different cultures have viewed not only insomnia but also the night itself, sleep, dreams, darkness, and activities that occur in the dark.”—New England Journal of Medicine “Summers-Bremner’s excellent account of insomnia shows that the consideration of our waking moments is indicative of the changing ways we think about life.”—Financial Times Magazine