Our Lady Of Guadalupe

Author: Stafford Poole
Editor: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816516230
Size: 20,87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 382
Download

The devotion to Our Lady of Guadalupe, based on the story of apparitions of the Virgin Mary to Juan Diego, an Indian neophyte, at the hill of Tepeyac in December 1531, is one of the most important formative religious and national symbols in the history of Mexico. In this first work ever to examine in depth every historical source of the Guadalupe apparitions, Stafford Poole traces the origins and history of the account, and in the process challenges many commonly accepted assumptions and interpretations. Poole finds that, despite common belief, the apparition account was unknown prior to 1648, when it was first published by a Mexican priest. And then, the virgin became the predominant devotion not of the Indians, but of the criollos, who found in the story a legitimization of their own national aspirations and an almost messianic sense of mission and identity. Poole finds no evidence of a contemporary association of the Virgin of Guadalupe with the Mexican goddess Tonantzin, as is frequently assumed, and he rejects the common assertion that the early missionaries consciously substituted Guadalupe for a preconquest deity.

Our Lady Of Guadalupe

Author: Jeanette Rodriguez
Editor: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292787723
Size: 10,41 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 450
Download

Our Lady of Guadalupe is the most important religious symbol of Mexico and one of the most powerful female icons of Mexican culture. In this study, based on research done among second-generation Mexican-American women, Rodriguez examines the role the symbol of Guadalupe has played in the development of these women. She goes beyond the thematic and religious implications of the symbol to delve into its relevance to their daily lives. Rodriguez's study offers an important reinterpretation of one of the New World's most potent symbols. Her conclusions dispute the common perception that Guadalupe is a model of servility and suffering. Rather, she reinterprets the symbol of Guadalupe as a liberating and empowering catalyst for Mexican-American women.

Nahuatl Theater Our Lady Of Guadalupe

Author: Barry D. Sell
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806137940
Size: 20,59 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Read: 643
Download

The foundation legend of the Mexican devotion to Our Lady of Guadalupe is one of the most appealing and beloved of all religious stories. In this volume, editors Barry D. Sell, Louise M. Burkhart, and Stafford Poole present the only known colonial Nahuatl-language dramas based on the Virgin of Guadalupe story: the Dialogue of the Apparition of the Virgin Saint Mary of Guadalupe, an anonymous work from the late seventeenth or early eighteenth century, and The Mexican Portent, authored by creole priest Joseph Pérez de la Fuente in the early eighteenth century. The plays, never before published in English translation, are vital works in the history of the Guadalupe devotion, for they show how her story was presented to native people at a time when it was not universally known. Faithful transcriptions and translations of the plays are accompanied here by introductory essays by Poole and Burkhart and by three additional previously unpublished Guadalupan texts in Nahuatl. This volume is the second in a four-volume series titled Nahuatl Theater, edited by Sell and Burkhart.

Our Lady Of Guadalupe

Author: Carl Anderson
Editor: Image
ISBN: 9780307589491
Size: 10,13 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Read: 366
Download

Nearly a decade after Spain's conquest of Mexico, the future of Christianity on the American continent was very much in doubt. Confronted with a hostile colonial government and Native Americans wary of conversion, the newly-appointed bishop-elect of Mexico wrote to tell the King of Spain that, unless there was a miracle, the continent would be lost. Between December 9 and December 12, 1531, that miracle happened, and it forever changed the future of the continent. It was then that the Virgin Mary famously appeared to a Native American Christian convert on a hilltop outside of what is now Mexico City. The image she left imprinted on his cloak or tilma has puzzled scientists for centuries, and yet Our Lady of Gudalupe’s place in history is profound. A continent that just months before the apparitions seemed completely lost to Christianity suddenly and inexplicably embraced it by the millions. Our Lady of Guadalupe's message of love replaced the institutionalized violence of the Aztec culture, and built a bridge between two worlds — the old and the new — that were just ten years earlier engaged in brutal warfare. Today, Our Lady of Guadalupe continues to inspire the devotion of millions. From Canada to Argentina — and even beyond the Americas — one finds great devotion to her, and great appreciation for her message of love, unity and hope. Today reproductions of the Virgin’s miraculous image can be seen throughout North and South America, in churches and homes, on billboards and even clothing apparel. Her shrine in Mexico City, where the miraculous image is housed to this day, is one of the most visited in the world. In Our Lady of Guadalupe: Mother of the Civilization of Love, Anderson & Chavez trace the history of Our Lady of Guadalupe from the sixteenth century to the present discuss of how her message was and continues to be an important catalyst for religious and cultural transformation. Looking at Our Lady of Guadalupe as a model of the Church and Juan Diego as a model for all Christians who seek to answer Christ's call of conversion and witness, the authors explore the changing face of the Catholic Church in North, Central, and South America, and they show how Our Lady of Guadalupe's message was not only historically significant, but how it speaks to contemporary issues confronting the American continents and people today.

Our Lady Of Guadalupe

Author: Francisco Serrano
Editor: Libros Tigrillo
ISBN: 9780888993359
Size: 14,20 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 254
Download

A retelling of the legend of Our Lady of Guadalupe, seen by a Mexican peasant only ten years after the fall of the Aztec Empire in 1531.

Our Lady Of Guadalupe

Author: Carl A. Anderson
Editor: Random House LLC
ISBN: 0385527721
Size: 13,56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 781
Download

Traces the influence of the sixteenth-century apparition in Mexico City, chronicling her evolution as a cultural symbol and her significance in the Catholic church's future in the western world.

Our Lady Of Guadalupe And Saint Juan Diego

Author: Eduardo Chávez
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742551053
Size: 16,74 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 922
Download

Provides an account of the Guadalupan Event in which the Virgin Mary is said to have appeared to Juan Diego Cuauhtlatoatzin, a native Mexican, in 1531, investigates the evidence that supports Juan Diego's account, and discusses the lasting cultural effects of the apparition.

Our Lady Of Everyday Life

Author: María del Socorro Castaneda-Liles
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190280395
Size: 11,83 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Read: 573
Download

Our Lady of Everyday Life examines the lived religion, from childhood to adulthood, of three generations of Mexican-origin Catholic women. The book provides an in-depth analysis of the Catholic beliefs that the women in this study inherited from their mothers, and the ways these beliefs becomethe religious/cultural template from which they first learn to see themselves as people of faith. Our Lady of Everyday Life also offers a comprehensive analysis of the ways Catholic culture sets the parameters within which Mexican-origin women learn how to be good girls in a manner that reduces agirl's agency to rubble. Castaneda-Liles demonstrates how women develop a type of Mexican Catholic imagination that moves them to challenge and reject the sanctification of shame, guilt, and aguante (endurance at all cost). This imagination allows these women to transgress limiting notions of what agood Catholic woman should be while retaining the aspects of Catholicism they find life-giving while still identifying as Catholics. This transgression is most visible in their relationship to La Virgen de Guadalupe, which is not fixed but fluid and deeply engaged in their process of self-awarenessin everyday life. Our Lady of Everyday Life applies an intersectional analysis that centers religion along with race, class, gender, and sexuality to the study of women. This ethnography provides an in-depth cross-sectional analysis of three generations of Mexican-origin women between the ages of 18 and 82 (singleand in college, mothers and older women). It is a multi-method study, including structured and unstructured interviews, focus groups, photographic and video documentation, and participant observation in Mexico and the United States.

Our Lady Of Guadalupe

Author: John F. Moffitt
Editor: McFarland
ISBN:
Size: 17,27 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 512
Download

According to legend, on December 8, 1531, the Virgin Mary appeared to the newly Christianized Juan Diego on the Mexican hill of Tepeyacac. As proof of her divine visit, she miraculously imprinted her image upon his mantle. That image, known as Our Lady of Guadalupe, has become a symbol of national consciousness in Mexico and a talisman for Mexican Americans. Yet its notable features include obviously European artistic techniques. How is it that Renaissance styles are employed in a 16th century Mexican icon supposedly not made by human hands? Looking beyond the divine explanation for the Lady’s existence, author John Moffitt uses historical and artistic detective work to determine the work’s earthly origin. Originally published in Spanish, this volume provides an in-depth study of Our Lady of Guadalupe. It places the work within the context of art history as well as local contemporary events. The mundane origin of the painting is fully traced and investigated as well as the proliferation of the legend which led to the eventual canonization of Juan Diego as the first native Mexican saint. Appendices provide crucial related Spanish-language texts by Miguel Sanchez (1648) and Luis Laso de la Vega (1649, originally published in Náhuatl). Numerous illustrations are included.