Closer

Author: Patrick Marber
Editor: Methuen Drama
ISBN:
File Size: 68,49 MB
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Patrick Marber was born in London. His first play, 'Dealer's Choice, won the Evening Standard award for best comedy and the Writer's Guild Award for best West End play. 'Closer' premiered at the Royal National Theatre in May 1997 and went on to receive many awards.
Patrick Marber: Versions
Language: en
Pages: 496
Authors: Patrick Marber
Categories:
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-12-06 - Publisher:

Books about Patrick Marber: Versions
Closer
Language: en
Pages: 126
Authors: Patrick Marber
Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007 - Publisher: Methuen Drama

Patrick Marber was born in London. His first play, 'Dealer's Choice, won the Evening Standard award for best comedy and the Writer's Guild Award for best West End play. 'Closer' premiered at the Royal National Theatre in May 1997 and went on to receive many awards.
Patrick Marber's Closer
Language: en
Pages: 130
Authors: Graham Saunders
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-06-06 - Publisher: A&C Black

Closer emerged as one of the most successful plays of the 1990s, and one with a continuing afterlife through the academy award nominated film adaptation in 2004. Although the work of dramatists such as Sarah Kane and Mark Ravenhill initially attracted the most critical and academic attention, Patrick Marber's Closer
After Miss Julie
Language: en
Pages: 37
Authors: Patrick Marber
Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010 - Publisher: Dramatists Play Service Inc

THE STORY: AFTER MISS JULIE transposes August Strindberg's 1888 play about sex and class to an English country house on the eve of Labour's historic landslide in 1945.
Translated and Visiting Russian Theatre in Britain, 1945–2015
Language: en
Pages: 392
Authors: Cynthia Marsh
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-05-18 - Publisher: Springer Nature

This book tackles questions about the reception and production of translated and untranslated Russian theatre in post-WW2 Britain: why in British minds is Russia viewed almost as a run-of-the-mill production of a Chekhov play. Is it because Chekhov is so dominant in British theatre culture? What about all those other