Pioneer Doctor

Author: Mari Grana
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780762751945
Size: 18,61 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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When Mollie stepped off the train in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1890, she knew she had to start a new life. She'd left her husband and his medical practice behind in Iowa, and with only a few hundred dollars in her pocket and a great deal of pride, she set out to find a new position as a physician. She was offered a job as a doctor to the miners in Bannack, Montana, and thus began her epic adventures as a pioneer doctor, a suffragette, and a crusader for public health reform in the Rocky Mountain West. Pioneer Doctor: The Story of a Woman's Work is the true story of Dr. Mary (Mollie) Babcock Atwater, a medicine woman who found freedom and opportunity in the wide-open spaces of America's frontier west. This remarkable tale has been creatively retold here by her granddaughter, award-winning author Mari Grana. Blending information from historical records as well as interviews with family and friends, the author has reconstructed Mollie's steps into a dramatic narrative that brings to life the doctor's struggles, her accomplishments, and the times in which she lived. Beautifully written and thoroughly researched, this is not just the biography of a fascinating woman. It is also the story of an era when daring women ventured forth and changed history for the rest of us.

Pioneer Doctor

Author: Lewis J. Moorman
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806149159
Size: 18,98 MB
Format: PDF
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Pioneer Doctor is the story of a half-century of medical practice, from the early days in Oklahoma Territory to metropolitan conditions. Lewis J. Moorman, M.D., once told a patient who apologized for calling him out late at night, “You must remember, I started with a team of Indian ponies twenty miles from a railroad.” Moorman’s experiences run the gamut of human ills and situations—of childbirth in a barn loft, the “faith healer” who infected a whole community with an “itch,” the mother who was sure her child had a case of the “go-backs.” He tells of encounters with Indians who needed medical help; the horrifying effects of gunshot and knife wounds; and the spiritual response of patients stricken with tuberculosis. In the literature of medical practice, Dr. Moorman’s association with Old Billy, his horse, approaches near-classic proportions. Obtained as payment for a long-overdue medical bill, Old Billy had a balky disposition—until the good doctor decided to talk things over with him one day. What follows offers a rare account of the relationship between a man and his horse. Pioneer Doctor stands as an entertaining and informative memoir, but its social and cultural significance is clear. For here is apparent a tremendous transformation as countless young physicians like Moorman went out from Louisville Medical College, covering the plains with horse-and-buggy doctors.

A Pioneer Doctor

Author: Elizabeth Porter Gould
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 16,55 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Desert Pioneer Doctor

Author: Frederick William Peterson
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 17,19 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Alice Hamilton Pioneer Doctor In Industrial Medicine

Author: Madeleine Parker Grant
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 14,47 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Hamilton, Alice.

A Pioneer Woman Doctor S Life

Author: Dr. Bethenia Angelina Owens-Adair
Editor: BIG BYTE BOOKS
ISBN:
Size: 17,80 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A friend once said to her, ‘If I wished to increase your height two and a half inches, I would attempt to press you down, and you would grow upward from sheer resentment.’ Divorced at eighteen from an abusive husband in 1859 (scandalous at the time), and with a little baby to care for, Bethenia Angelina Owens was determined to make her way in the world. Her family begged her to let them support her but she wanted to earn her own livelihood. Taking in laundry, teaching school, and making cheese were among the tasks she set herself to. She eventually built a thriving business as a milliner that allowed her to send her son to college and to fulfill her own dream of becoming a doctor. Against all odds and a tidal wave of objections by friends, family, and male doctors, she prevailed. Despite the sentiment of the times that it was disgraceful for a woman to practice medicine, she enrolled in 1878 at the University of Michigan. By 1884, she was making $7,000 per year, an astronomical sum, as a physician. For all of her life she was a strong and vocal advocate of women's rights. As a doctor, she gave the shocking advice, "Nothing will preserve woman’s grace and her symmetrical form so much as vigorous and systematic exercise, and horseback riding stands at the head of the list, providing she has a foot in each stirrup, instead of having the right limb twisted around a horn." She also provides accounts of other pioneer women of her acquaintance. For the first time, this long out-of-print volume is available as an affordable, well-formatted book for e-readers and smartphones. Be sure to LOOK INSIDE by clicking the cover above. Buy it today!

Pioneer Doctor

Author: Mary Kent Hughes
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 10,98 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Goodbye Judge Lynch

Author: John W. Davis
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806137742
Size: 11,77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Tells the fascinating story of how lawlessness finally came to an end in the Big Horn Basin of northern Wyoming--one of the last frontiers in the continental United States.

The Seminole Freedmen

Author: Kevin Mulroy
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806155884
Size: 12,17 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Popularly known as “Black Seminoles,” descendants of the Seminole freedmen of Indian Territory are a unique American cultural group. Now Kevin Mulroy examines the long history of these people to show that this label denies them their rightful distinctiveness. To correct misconceptions of the historical relationship between Africans and Seminole Indians, he traces the emergence of Seminole-black identity and community from their eighteenth-century Florida origins to the present day. Arguing that the Seminole freedmen are neither Seminoles, Africans, nor “black Indians,” Mulroy proposes that they are maroon descendants who inhabit their own racial and cultural category, which he calls “Seminole maroon.” Mulroy plumbs the historical record to show clearly that, although allied with the Seminoles, these maroons formed independent and autonomous communities that dealt with European American society differently than either Indians or African Americans did. Mulroy describes the freedmen’s experiences as runaways from southern plantations, slaves of American Indians, participants in the Seminole Wars, and emigrants to the West. He then recounts their history during the Civil War, Reconstruction, enrollment and allotment under the Dawes Act, and early Oklahoma statehood. He also considers freedmen relations with Seminoles in Oklahoma during the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Although freedmen and Seminoles enjoy a partially shared past, this book shows that the freedmen’s history and culture are unique and entirely their own.