Quakers And The American Family British Settlement In The Delaware Valley

Author: Amherst Barry Levy Assistant Professor of History University of Massachusetts
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198021674
File Size: 26,38 MB
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Americans have an unusually strong family ideology. We believe that morally self-sufficient nuclear households must serve as the foundation of a republican society. In this brilliant history, Barry Levy traces this contemporary view of family life all the way back to the Quakers. _____ Levy argues that the Quakers brought a new vision of family and social life to America--one that contrasted sharply with the harsh, formal world of the Puritans in New England. The Quaker emphasis was on affection, friendship and hospitality. They stressed the importance of women in the home, and of self-disciplined, non-coercive childrearing. _____ This book explains how and why the Quakers' had such a profound cultural impact (and why more so in Pennsylvania and America than in England); and what the Quakers' experience with their own radical family system can tell us about American family ideology. ______ Who were the Northwest British Quakers and why did their family system so impress English, French, and New England reformers--Voltaire, Crevecouer, Brissot, Emerson, George Bancroft, Lydia Maria Child, and Lousia May Alcott, to name just a few? To answer this question, Levy tells the story of a large group of Quaker farmers from their development of a new family and communal life in England in the 1650s to their emigration and experience in Pennsylvania between 1681 and 1790. The book is thus simultaneously a trans-Atlantic community study of the migration and transplantation of ordinary British peoples in the tradition of Sumner Chilton Powell's Puritan Village; the story of the formation and development of a major Anglo-American faith; and an exploration of the origins of American family ideology.
Quakers and the American Family : British Settlement in the Delaware Valley
Language: en
Pages: 258
Authors: Amherst Barry Levy Assistant Professor of History University of Massachusetts
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1988-06-30 - Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Americans have an unusually strong family ideology. We believe that morally self-sufficient nuclear households must serve as the foundation of a republican society. In this brilliant history, Barry Levy traces this contemporary view of family life all the way back to the Quakers. _____ Levy argues that the Quakers brought
Forming American Politics
Language: en
Pages: 586
Authors: Alan Tully
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-12-01 - Publisher: JHU Press

"—Michael Zuckerman, University of Pennsylvania.
Family Cycles
Language: en
Pages: 182
Authors: Allan C. Carlson
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-07-05 - Publisher: Routledge

In this paradigm-shifting volume, Allan C. Carlson identifies and examines four distinct cycles of strength or weakness of American family systems. This distinctly American family model includes early and nearly universal marriage, high fertility, close attention to parental responsibilities, complementary gender roles, meaningful intergenerational bonds, and relative stability. Notably, such
Quakers and Abolition
Language: en
Pages: 264
Authors: Brycchan Carey, Geoffrey Plank
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-03-30 - Publisher: University of Illinois Press

This collection of fifteen insightful essays examines the complexity and diversity of Quaker antislavery attitudes across three centuries, from 1658 to 1890. Contributors from a range of disciplines, nations, and faith backgrounds show Quaker's beliefs to be far from monolithic. They often disagreed with one another and the larger antislavery
Founding Friends
Language: en
Pages: 264
Authors: Patricia D'Antonio
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006 - Publisher: Lehigh University Press

Founding Friends is a history of day-to-day life inside the Friends Asylum for the Insane in early nineteenth-century Philadelphia. It uses an extraordinarily rich data source: the daily diaries that the Asylum's lay superintendents kept between 1814 and 1850. In their diaries, these men wrote about their own and their