Railroad Depots Of Southwest Ohio

Author: Mark J. Camp
Editor: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738584157
File Size: 30,40 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Springfield was the original destination of the two oldest railroad companies to lay rails in Ohio, the Mad River and Lake Erie Railroad and the Little Miami Railroad. This would form the first rail link between Lake Erie and the Ohio River. Other routes became more important as rails eventually spread like spokes of a wheel from Cincinnati, and connections were made to Akron, Chicago, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Indianapolis, Lexington, Louisville, Marietta, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, and Toledo as well as many other cities by the late 1800s. Hundreds of depots were erected to serve train travelers, ranging from the smallest shelter to the standard combined passenger-freight building to the major city passenger terminal. Cincinnati, Dayton, and Springfield became railroad centers, and towns like Blanchester, Hamilton, Loveland, Middletown, Morrow, Wilmington, and Xenia, served by more than one line, became busy transfer points. With the decline of rail passenger service, depots became unnecessary--many were demolished. Railroad Depots of Southwest Ohio presents a pictorial look at a sampling of these grand structures when they were in their prime.
Railroad Depots of Southwest Ohio
Language: en
Pages: 127
Authors: Mark J. Camp
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010 - Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

Springfield was the original destination of the two oldest railroad companies to lay rails in Ohio, the Mad River and Lake Erie Railroad and the Little Miami Railroad. This would form the first rail link between Lake Erie and the Ohio River. Other routes became more important as rails eventually
Railroad Depots of Northeast Ohio
Language: en
Pages: 127
Authors: Mark J. Camp
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007 - Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

The first rail lines in northeast Ohio opened for business in July 1850, and by the 1890s, northeast Ohio was laced with railroad tracks. Cleveland was the hub of railroad activity, and important rail-served lake ports developed at Ashtabula, Conneaut, Fairport Harbor, Huron, and Lorain. Akron became a center of
Sod's Law
Language: en
Pages: 300
Authors: Sam Leith
Categories: Humor
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-11-01 - Publisher: Atlantic Books Ltd

To every explorer with his map upside down, to every air-traffic controller suddenly receiving Magic FM through his headphones, to every astronomer whose new planet turns out to be a bit of bran-flake on the eyepiece of his telescope, Sod's Law says: you are not alone. Sam Leith tells the
Railroad Depots of Central Ohio
Language: en
Pages: 128
Authors: Mark J. Camp
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

By the mid-1850s, the railroad craze had hit central Ohio. Pioneer railroads that were to evolve into portions of the Baltimore and Ohio, New York Central, and Pennsylvania Railroads connected the state capital, Columbus, with the canals, Lake Erie, and the Ohio River. The region was crisscrossed by numerous other
Interstate Commerce Commission Reports
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: United States. Interstate Commerce Commission
Categories: Interstate commerce
Type: BOOK - Published: 1952 - Publisher:

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